Cover Image: Dear Edward

Dear Edward

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Member Reviews

I’m not entirely sure I can find words that properly express how this book made me feel...raw, yet hopeful—a book that inspires so many conflicting feelings. But I’m so very thankful I read it.
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Dear Edward is not a particularly happy book- it deals with an imagined idea of a real situation of tragedy. The characters we meet are largely deceased within a few pages. But it packs quite the emotional punch nonetheless. I loved the friendship at the base of Edward's new life post-accident, after losing his entire family (along with all the other passengers) on his flight from New York to his new home in California. I didn't love all the characters but they were true to themselves, and drawn with very different lives and meanings. The strongest parts of the novel, for me, were the return moments in the past when we see them living and pondering their lives. There's more than a little bittersweetness to getting to know them only after they are already past tense- but it's mostly an effective narrative device. Watching Edward grow up in the novel (as his present continues long after theirs has ceased) is less interesting, but resolves in a satisfying way. Four stars for good writing and ideas.
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Captivating, suspenseful, entertaining novel! This beautiful story kept me on the edge of my seat while I was reading it! Would highly recommend to those who enjoy this genre.
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This is such an amazing and emotional story of survival. It did a good job exploring grief and growing up and I thoroughly enjoyed it.
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This book still resides in my memory 1 year after I read it. A story about a 12 year old plane crash survivor, Edward, and the aftereffects of being the only survivor.
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I read this book when it was released in Norway, and found it to be gripping and beautiful. A coming of age - story about how we find true meaning in our lives. At the center of the story is a traumatic event, and the miracle boy that is born from it. "Dear Edward" is loosely based on real events. In  2010 Ruben van Assouw was the sole survivor of a plane crash that killed his mother, father and brother. The novel examines how  a person can go on living, after experiencing something so heartbreaking like this. 

"Dear Edward" is a moving novel that made me cry several times. It is a wonderful novel about making everyday count, and to always remember to tell our loved ones that we love them - we may never know when our time here on earth comes to an end. This is labeled as a novel for adults, but it could also be aimed at young adults. Just beware that at times it is very sad.
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I truly had no idea what to expect when I started this book, but I was pleasantly surprised.  Heartbreaking and heartwarming, Dear Edward is a beautiful story of redemption through some extremely horrible and difficult circumstances.
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I liked this book, I didn't love it. I wasn't exactly sure why until I started reading some other reviews and one hit the nail on the head: I didn't feel the emotion. The topic is tragic: a plane crash where 191 passengers die but one 12-year-old boy survives. How does he grieve? Heal? Move on?

The book alternates between the present where the boy (Edward) is going on with life, living with his aunt and uncle and becoming close friends with their next door neighbor, Shay, and the flight itself.

The scenes with the flight itself were consumed with a cast of characters that for a bit were hard to keep straight. There are at least a half dozen characters mentioned (maybe more) with snippets of their lives and why they were on the plane but there wasn't enough to care deeply about any of them. I'm not sure why they were all included, to be honest, as it took away from Edward and his story. My guess is that it was to humanize some of the lives lost, but their stories weren't very compelling to me.

I liked this book in that it was different. I loved the characters of Edward and Shay and I think that if more time had been on them and their relationship and the characters they interacted with in present day, it would have been more emotional. I just didn't feel the grief that I would have expected.
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I liked this book, but didn't love it.  The story was interesting but for some reason I didn't connect with the main  character, Edward.  I did really like Shay and her mom;  Shay's personality added a lot to the story.   Overall, it just didn't inspire much emotion from me, which I expected  from this story.  I have a friend who listened to it and loved it, so maybe that would have made the difference?
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I enjoyed this book a lot and I’m honestly not sure what took me so long to read it! It was a fast paced book and I couldn’t put it down.
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dear Edward is a quick read. The author reminds you of the great humanity that people have to help others. I would definitely recommend this book and I have repeatedly
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Now here’s a thing.  I want you to read this lovely novel, but I don’t want to tell you about it.  Well, no, I do, but my fear is that it would be so easy to ruin.  You see, Chapter 1 introduces the Adler family – mother, father, two sons.  One is a teen; the other a pre-teen.  A nice ordinary family moving from New York to LA, just diddling along, and you’re wondering whether the whole thing is going to stay ordinary.  Not enough to hang a verdict on so far.  OK, then Chapter 2.  As shattering as a rock slide.  The story is aftermath.  It is for those who remain to dig for daylight, clear the rubble, choke on the dust, to find a way

You will love this story, and you must discover it whole, not through the bits and pieces that I or anyone else could dole out.  No, it is not a literary marvel and doesn’t aspire to be.  In fact, it strikes me as possibly abutting that fuzzy place we’ve come to call young adult fiction.  A matter of opinion, I guess, and who cares.  It is splendid, and why not?  A wonderful story, skillfully told, with fully-formed characters you’ll invest in.  Whether you’re looking ahead at your life, fighting the good fight, or looking back, what is a life worth?  What do we make of the singular life we’re each given?  I put everything aside for Dear Edward, an absorbing and provocative interlude, and I thank you, Ms. Napolitano, for Edward and Shay, Lacy and John, Beso, Principal Arundhi and the ferns.  And for the 191 silver birds pictured in my mind.

Released last week in paperback, Dear Edward deserves a place in your TBR pile, preferably on top.
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The premise of the book is great and the author really delivers. Great read. Highly recommended.                       .
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Edward is the sole survivor of a plane crash. His whole family was on that plane. Now, he must live with his aunt and uncle. He spends weeks in the hospital. Everyone wants to see him, touch him, talk to the miracle boy. Family members of the victims want to know if he remembers seeing their loved ones. Edward feels as though he is still on that plane. Stuck in the air. He struggles to come to terms with what has happened. Through the story, we learn about some of the other passengers on the plane. About their lives and the people, they leave behind. Eventually, Edward and his friend stumble on something his uncle was keeping from him and it helps him find purpose in his life.
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Dear Edward reminded me of so many airline tragedies.  The takeaway from this book was you can go on living again.  You will go through struggles and maybe guilt feelings, but it is possible for you to go on to live a happy fulfilling life.  I recommend this book to you especially if you have faced any sort of tragedy in your life.
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My most favorite thing to do is NOT flying, I'm a nervous passenger so I was a little worried about reading this book.  However, the storyline wasn't as much about the crash as it was about the little boy and his life after the crash. 

It was so hard to read in places, his sadness and grief was just heartbreaking, but the author did such a wonderful job of conveying that sadness and grief, it broke my heart.  There was happiness too, I just wanted more happiness.

I think it was realistic and believable, it's unfortunate the author was unable to talk to the real boy, the inspiration for this book.  Having not been able to do that and having not ever been in this position, I think she did a great job with the storyline, narrative and development of the little boy.
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What a devastating story but so beautiful. I read this quickly and did not want to put it down. The writing is complex and haunting and I look forward to Napolitano's future novels. Thanks for the advanced copy of this.
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One summer morning, twelve-year-old Edward Adler, his beloved older brother, his parents, and 183 other passengers board a flight in Newark headed for Los Angeles. Among them is a Wall Street wunderkind, a young woman coming to terms with an unexpected pregnancy, an injured vet returning from Afghanistan, a septuagenarian business tycoon, and a free-spirited woman running away from her controlling husband. And then, tragically, the plane crashes. Edward is the sole survivor.
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This book is great! Would definitely recommend. Thanks so much to NetGalley and the publisher for the ARC.
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Twelve year old Edward Adler is the sole survivor of a flight from NY to Los Angeles, CA. 183 passengers and a crew of 8 perished along with Edward's parents and his older brother. Hospitalized and eventually recovering from his injuries, the next part, the emotional healing, is sure to be the hardest. How does a young boy like Edward deal with such horrific loss as well as the difficulties of adolescence and still find their place in the world?

Edward is taken in by Edward's mother's sister, Lacey, who is also grieving, dealing with the loss of her sister. Neither she nor her husband John are comfortable talking about their losses. Then there is Edward's therapist, Mike, and his beautiful yet quirky next door neighbor, Shay, who is always there for him when ever he needs a friend to talk to.

The back story alternates between some of the passengers that were on board who came from all walks of life. Edward's story left a lump in my throat at times, I found myself really taken by his story as well as one of the other passenger's story as well - a few others were less interesting to me. Overall, I was happy I tried this one, the writing is excellent and it was expertly narrated by Cassandra Campbell. If you are in the mood for a well written story about trauma, grief, survival, loss and healing, be sure to add this one to your list. Deeply moving.
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