Cover Image: Mollycoddling the Feckless

Mollycoddling the Feckless

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Member Reviews

This book didn't really live up to my expectations. I was expecting an insight into the types of cases a social worker has to deal with but instead it was more of a memoir reflecting on the changing nature of the job over the years. Interesting enough but not what I thought it was going to be.
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With two parents working in social work and academia, this I knew would be an interesting read for me. I don't know a huge amount about social work in Scotland and in fact I know very little about it in England where I come from... but this book was eye opening, moving and harrowing at times. Well written and much enjoyed.,
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I was drawn by the title of this book and due to working in a similar field to Social Workers, understand the thinking behind it. Sometimes the villains and often though of as the do-gooders, frontline staff can face a lot of criticism. This book is a memoir of Alistair Findlay’s career as a social worker in Scotland starting in the 1970’s. I was really looking forward to the details of the cases he worked on and the diversity the job offers. I was slightly disappointed with the lack of this within the book and feel too much emphasis was given to the political changes of the times  and the legal framework around the job. I’m sure many readers will find this fascinating, but I would have preferred more human interest detail.
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I am an ex social worker (in England)  so was interested in reading about the experience and cases Findlay dealt with in his long and varied career working in Scotland.
I do tend to like very people-based, human-experience reads.
However this is more about the administration and politics of Scottish social work in the twentieth century and early 2000s, and about Findlay’s personal journey (there are lots of names, committees etc) and will appeal to anyone who is interested in this side of things. 
So, for me, it didn’t quite offer the colour and human interest I was looking for, but I rate it four stars on the basis that it would be perfect for someone interested in social work of years gone by with a more academic and - perhaps - a more local interest.
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The author draws us into the world of social work.The people difficulties hardships not an easy job a job that can be emotionally exhausting this was an eye opening look at this profession. #netgalley#luathpress.
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This was an interesting read for me as I know of many of the locations, institutions and some of the people being discussed (not the clients - the others). Part memoir, part political commentary, part art this book definitely made me think,
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The author gives a vivid look at what life as a social worker is like.  Even though the author is a Scottish social worker, they encountered many of the issues we do in the United States.  I highly recommend this one!
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A very well written and enjoyable book that gives you a real insight into the work and struggles of people on the front line with vulnerable clients. This is a sector I have worked in, and I think Alistair represents the dedication of staff and the difficulties they face very well. I enjoyed the humour, and the way the author presents his material without judgement or rancour. I would highly recommend this book as an excellent antidote to the social worker bashing that goes on in our tabloid press.
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I was hoping this would show more actual cases. Instead it is more a reflection on the changing nature of social work in Scotland at the time. As such, I feel it would be more interesting to insiders instead of the casual reader trying to glimpse what those in the profession deal with on a day to day basis.
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A year or so back I read a book titled The Secret Barrister, having had very little contact (thankfully) with the legal services the book was both enlightening and depressing, I have contact with Social Workers as my profession and theirs often overlap, I read this book with only a comfort break and I found this book even more enlightening and depressing than the secret barrister, my admiration for the author and social workers is at an all time high, this is a book that should be mandatory reading and not just for professionals that have contact with social workers, I recommend this book unreservedly
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