Cover Image: A Tale of Two Mommies

A Tale of Two Mommies

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Member Reviews

This book is the sweetest ever, ever, EVER! It was so heartwarming to read it written in such a beautiful, loving way! All families are valid and beautiful, and there should be way, way more books like this one.
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Sensitive and clear book, it was really successful in reading it with children. I would suggest using props and puppets.
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I love books about children with LGBTQ parents. This book gave me warm fuzzy feelings. I like the story better than the illustrations but it's really not bad.
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This is an adorable picture book about a boy with two mothers. His friends "ask who does..." and he answers. I like this one even more than "A Tale of Tow Daddies".
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The story is good. Not much children books that shows queer parents. I really appreciate it. Thank you Netgalley
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Thank you for the opportunity! I love to bring books with diverse families and experiences into my counseling office and this book would perfectly fit that description. Being able to share and show students how families and people can be different and have different experiences then them help to borden their perspectives as well and support empathy development.
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*I received this book for free through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review*

1.5 stars

It's good to show kids just because you have two mom's doesn't mean you miss out on "dad stuff". A second mom can still fix things that break, take you fishing, and coach your t-ball team. The book helps take away gender from activities. It would have been less repetitive if the book discussed why someone can have two moms. I didn't like the art style and there wasn't much of a story. In conclusion, a simple book that lacked a deeper meaning and more details.
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First and foremost, I would love to thank NetGalley, the author, and publishers for allowing me the opportunity to read this advanced copy. This book has so many moral values. Recommended
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I love that there are many books now represent more diverse families. Diversity is such an important thing for children to learn and embrace as no two families are the same! I would recommend this book to everyone. It is important that we also work towards breaking stereotypes in general. This is a great book that’s covers a lot of good topics to start discussions with children. I think more books like these should be read in the classroom
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This is a fun picture book that challenges traditional parenting roles. Why does a dad have to be the parent that takes you fishing? With the innocence of a questioning child, a family with two moms has their roles identified for friends at the beach. 
This is a great book for all families to read to their children and for all of us to question why the roles we have are the way they are!
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I was given the opportunity to read both A Tale of Two Daddies and A Tale of Two Mommies by Vanita Oelschlager from NetGalley and VanitaBooks LLC Publishing who sent me a digital ARC in exchange for an honest review. The two books mirror each other in style and pacing and they both gently push the edge of gender stereotypes that children may ask other children who have parents of the same gender identity. The artwork in the picture book is vibrant and eye-catching keeping the audience engaged and interested. There is some slight sense of nostalgia with the fact that all adults can only be seen from their knees down which reminded me of charlie brown. And all of the writing contents have the voice of the children in the book. I found it very valuable that along with answering which parental figure did what there were interjections of the child answering that they independently did things. Overall 10/10 book and it is definitely on my list of books to purchase for my libraries.
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It’s a dual review day! I was recently granted access to the books: A Tale of Two Mommies and A Tale of Two Daddies. Written by Vanita Oelschlager, illustrated by Mike Blanc and Kristin Blackwood.
I’m going to step out if my established form of review, and talk a bit about the role of the Educator in teaching what many people consider “controversial subjects.” In an attempt to avoid any suggestion of virtue signaling, I’m going to avoid telling you about what I believe because whoI am as a person, and what my thoughts are become secondary, the minute I walk through my classroom door. I’m that room, my responsibility is much greater. I’m not Amy McKay. I’m Ms Amy, and as such, I have very simple goals. To create an environment of acceptance, and belonging.
A classroom can be one of the most magical places. It is it’s own entity, and for me, (I work with under 6’s,) the place where it all starts. I’m constantly surprised by attitudes expressed towards Early Childhood Education in general. That it is optional, less than important, but the opposite couldn’t be more true. This is where it starts. A love of learning, the curiosity of it all; the adventure and the reward. The wonder of a classroom, the possibility.
The belonging.
That is why my role as an Educator is the only thing I consider within these walls. It is my ethical duty to ensure that each one of my tiny, magnificent humans is represented in my classroom. That means ensuring that I am creating a community that recognizes all of our similarities, and our differences. That recognizes the individual, and honours the group.
If your goal is create a space of acceptance, it is quite easily done. All that is required of you is to accept. And honour, and acknowledge. The planning takes a bit more of an approach, but an Educator really just needs to step back and assess whether they can see each of their students in the environment reflected in everyday classroom life. This isn’t making sure you talk about Hanukkah, when you talk about Christmas. This is an everyday thing, a commitment to inclusive practice.
It’s the tweaking of “Father’s/Mother’s Day,” to make space for all Families. It’s in multicultural crayons, papers and paints. It’s in your toys choices, it’s in how you speak to them. The classroom materials you post. The language you use. Never underestimate how you use your words, gestures and expressions. It’s on never forgetting that creating a place where a child feels seen for who they are, not what they are or where they come from… is your responsibility.
It’s in your books. It’s in presenting a diverse selection of reading materials that show the many different cultures, families. Choose books that acknowledge differences in socioeconomic status, food insecurity, surrogacy, blended families, family structures, a variety of lifestyles. It’s overwhelming, but when assessing my classroom, I try not to look for the things I’m not showing them. I simply ensure that what I am showing them includes every child enrolled.

For example, the books A Tale of Two Mommies and A Tale of Two Daddies. Children are the most beautifully blunt creatures when it comes to questions. This book is delivered in exactly that way. Full of simple, rhymes and a song like cadence. I’m the story, a child asks their peers about their their Moms/Dads. No judgement, no suggestion that it may be “different.” Just the curiosity of what many children consider the roles of parenting, based on gender.
Who cooks your food? Who helps you when you are hurt? Who takes care of you at night? All the questions basic, but gently challenging “traditional,” family roles. The general point of the story being that in any family, with any combination parenting adult(s,) there are roles for everyone. And someone to meet your needs. There is love. A Parent who takes care of homework, a Parent that drops you off at school.
I enjoyed the simplicity of presentation here. That is the spirit I reflect in my classroom, and it opens the opportunity for conversation. I often draw the similarities/differences conclusion. If I draw any conclusion at all. If questioned, I would discuss. If not, I would say nothing and allow the information to just be.
In the way of review, I give A Tale of Two Mommies and a Tale of Two Daddies ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️. The subject matter is relevant. The language is well thought out. The subject matter thoughtfully approached, and it was enjoying to explore the back and forth of their questions and explanations. The illustrations are well done, and engaging.
Thank you to VanitaBooks and NetGalley, for the opportunity to review.
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The doppelgänger story to “a tale of two daddies”, this time telling the story of a little boy with two mommies while his friend asks him which mommy does different activities with him.
I won’t go into my full life story, but to keep it short, my little brother was adopted by two moms, and when I read this story my heart swelled with love all over again.
The innocence of other children being confused as to which parent plays different roles is very accurate to how kids really voice their wonders. 
This book is a short and sweet story that i highly recommend any parent reads their kids, it’s so important to help your children understand that every family is different and beautiful in their own way.
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I am always looking for books that have representation of characters or families different than our own so my children understand and embrace diversity. 'A Tale of Two Mommies' was a wonderfully illustrated story about a family dynamic, which parent does what. I would recommend this book and the companion book 'A Tale of Two Daddies' to all families.
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An adorable read I'd definitely recommend for any parent in a same sex relationship to give to their child.
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This is a cute story that helps illustrate a mommy/mommy parenting model. Through the examples in the book, young readers learn that having two mommies really isn't any different than a mommy/daddy dynamic. This book does a great job of normalizing a relationship structure than has been stigmatized in the past.
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What  a wonderful resource for all parents. This book makes it easy to share with any child families that are different from theirs. It's hard to fins children's stories with LGBT parents. I would definitely recommend this book.
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Even though this book was published in 2011, the message still stands strong today. There is this whole debate that we shouldn't be teaching children this until they're old enough, when in fact, children always ask these types of questions. Children are naturally curious and there is always an age-appropriate way to approach these topics. Families come in all sorts of shapes, sizes, and colors. I wish I had this kind of book to read when I was growing up!
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My heart is beyond words. I sat with my kids today and we talked for over an hour after reading this book. To us, this book is just common sense because that's how we live our lives. But the questions that they had on why books like this need to be written and why it isn't considered more normal for a child to have 2 parents of the same gender.... My heart broke and was healed all in one with how amazing this book was. It triggered a conversation that we might not have otherwise thought to have and I am 100% here for that.

The young one in the book goes through the usual explanations one might expect of how both mommies are his mom, regardless of what needs doing. If he needs one thing that isn't one parent's forte, then his other parent steps in and vice versa. <3
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This book was adorable! It was so sweet and educational at the same time while still being a very simple and real children's book that I think would be a great resource in libraries or homes. The illustrations were adorable and the rhyming sentences made this book very pleasing to read out loud or in your head. A perfect read for pride month or any time of the year.
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