The Contact Paradox

Pub Date:   |   Archive Date: 01 Jan 2020

Member Reviews

I was impressed at the depth of this book and its detailed approach to such a complex topic. It reads as an accessible, though still academic, history book that provides a great background and look forward to the possibility of future contact.
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A very interesting, very well researched book about the possibility of making contact with an intelligent alien civilization.  The author not only takes us down the path of what humans would need to do scientifically to try and make contact (it's a lot) but he also spends a good portion of the book walking us through the broader issue of "Is it even a good idea?"

He discusses what exactly does "intelligence" encompass and is altruism solely a human trait- kind of an important topic wouldn't you say.  Cooper delves into the sociological and ethical issues of this as well as how risk assessment needs to be huge part of it.  We learn  about SETI,  METI, Dyson spheres, the Tall Tower concept, self replicating probes,  and of course, the Fermi Paradox........If they are indeed out there, then why haven't they made contact ?

The bottom line is that scientists have discovered thousands of exoplanets in our galaxy with more being discovered every day.  If contact is coming any time soon, we as a species, need to be totally prepared.  A fascinating read.

Thanks to Keith Cooper, Bloomsburg Sigma and Net galley for an ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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Thank you to NetGalley for a Kindle ARC of The Contact Paradox.

I love aliens; aliens books, movies, documentaries, I'll give anything with an alien theme a try. One of my favorite shows is History's Ancient Aliens.

Naturally, I had to request The Contact Paradox, hoping for more...well, aliens, but it was a different kind of read.

The author delves into the psychological, sociological and humanistic concepts behind SETI, or the search for extraterrestrial life, breaking down our society's, perhaps naive, beliefs behind the reasons we are looking for contact beyond the stars.

But, is it safe to do so?

Does our assumption that altruism and intelligence supersede any negative or destructive qualities a higher form of life may possess and initiate if they choose to communicate with us?

The author delves deep into research, and its clear he has done his homework.

There's a lot of scientific jargon, quotes and details and though it makes for a fascinating read, at times it became too science-y and overwhelming.

I just wanted to know more about aliens.

The Contact Paradox is an honest narrative discussing the pros and cons of seeking life beyond our own planet; should we do it, and are we doing it for the right reasons?

Hopefully, these questions will be answered before we make contact with another species, and they will be kinder than we are.
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Full review forthcoming.................................................................................................................................................................................
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