Meditative Origami

Pub Date:   |   Archive Date: 17 Dec 2019

Member Reviews

Originally published on my blog:  Nonstop Reader.

Meditative Origami is part origami tutorial and workbook, and part adult coloring book. Due out 13th Nov 2019 from Dover, it's 64 pages and will be available in paperback format.

Roughly 45% of the content is used on a good and clear origami tutorial with a few very simple folds including a heart, a rose, the crane, swan, and peacock and a few others. The rest of the book has  attractive and intricate coloring pages with various themes: geometric, floral, mandala-like, nature themed, etc. The book is not precisely square, and above the coloring parts of the pages, each has a meditative thought: "Be still", "Surrender to what is", "With our thoughts we make the world", and similar good ideas.

The pages are meant to be colored (there is no coloring tutorial) and then cut out and folded. There are examples on the covers of the book. I have enjoyed coloring books and mindfulness journals (and doodling) as well as origami. I don't know why it never really occurred to me to combine the two before now.

This would make a superlative gift for a coloring book fan or origamist. I was provided an electronic copy of the book, so I can't speak to the quality or thickness/slickness of the paper of the physical copy, but presumably it will be up to Dover's craft titles' standard quality.

Interesting book and appealing coloring designs.

Four stars.
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I give this book 3 stars. An average rating for an average book. 
Half the book is origami, half is colouring. I found it odd that the title doesn’t indicate that, but it is mentioned in the subtitle.
I was just disappointed overall. The book feels drab and lifeless. I have never done any origami and was excited to try, but I was not inspired by this book. There isn’t anything outright wrong with it. The origami portion gives a legend for the meaning of the different symbols used. Each item is given one page with step by step diagrams of the way to fold paper to make that item. These pages are just diagrams with lines or arrows corresponding to the legend at the start of the book. While this is functional, it makes pages look boring, drab, lifeless. 
It’s about as fun and exciting as looking at blueprints. I wish there was a little more text along with each item. A short description, maybe some fun facts or historical info about the meaning or origin of each item. Maybe some suggestions for variations or what to use them for, or a couple pics of different sizes or colours. Something I would look at and think ‘oh wow, I want to try that right now. I could do xyz with it.’ Something to inspire and excite me to try them.

Thank you to NetGalley for providing a free eBook for an honest and voluntary review.
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