Cover Image: Displacement

Displacement

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Member Reviews

Such a beautiful book that spans decades through a little bit of magical realism. Historical fiction/fantasy. WWII internment camps.
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This is an interesting and unique addition to the autobiographical fiction genre and graphic novel format- I really enjoyed it (though pacing was not great) and look forward to what the author will bring to us next!
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This book was a perfect young adult introduction to the history of the Japanese Internment camps. The framing of a teen girl being sent back in time creates a tension that seems realistic, and helps teens today relate to history.
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A stunning graphic novel weaving real history with fiction. The images were emotionally moving, the storyline was fascinating. Recommended for all.
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When Kiku goes to San Francisco for a vacation with her mother, she is pulled back in time to her grandmother’s era, the early 1940s. She comes back almost immediately, but it happens again and again, until she seems to be stuck in the time period, as her grandmother and her family and many other Japanese Americans are incarcerated during World War II..... https://blogs.slj.com/goodcomicsforkids/2020/06/04/review-displacement/
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While I am not usually one to read graphic novels, I really enjoyed how accessible this graphic novel made a part of history that rarely gets talked about. This was an informative read that I could definitely see being used to teach about Japanese Internment. I would definitely want to continue reading about this subject to get a better idea, as this did seem like a more broad, beginner's understanding of Japanese Internment.

The primary reasons for the rating is just the fact that I felt this story was more plot driven rather than character driven, which made it hard to connect to the main character. This is an important story, especially because Japanese Internment has been buried and downplayed, but I would have enjoyed knowing more about the main character.

Overall, this was a good read, and I would definitely recommend it to anyone who is looking for a good supplemental material!
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A classic of middle school class reading, Janet Yolen's "The Devil's Arithmetic" tells a story of the Holocaust by sending a modern child back in time to witness and experience her own family's treatment in a concentration camp, thus bringing history into a modern perspective. "Displacement" is a similar treatment of the Internment of Japanese Americans during WWII—but with a more advanced, updated story and a graphic novel format with beautiful drawings. I hope it's also widely adopted for classroom reading!
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An intriguing way to share the too often downplayed history of Japanese interment camps during WWII in the US. Part magical realism or sci fi, part historical bio - this graphic follows the author back in time to experience for herself what happened to her Japanese grandmother and great grandparents during the war. The idea of memories being held by a group of people and having the power to affect generations to come in such a tangible way was fascinating to watch play out on the page.
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A beautifully created lesson on the experience of Japanese-Americans in the 1940s. While it leans a little heavily on being educational, I don't think that takes away from the narrative or the characters. A great option for middle school readers looking to learn more about that period of history.
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Two of the most acclaimed books of 2019 were They Called Us Enemy by George Takei and Internment by Samira Ahmed. Readers seeking an exceptional read-alike will find one in Displacement by Kiku Hughes. In this debut graphic novel, a Seattle teen named Kiku experiences “displacements” to other places in time. The first time, she is on a trip to San Francisco with her mom, who is exploring her own mother’s former neighborhood in Japantown. Ernestina and her parents, immigrants from Japan, lived there until 1942, when they were relocated to incarceration camps along with 120,000 other people of Japanese descent (“nikkei”). After brief displacements to her grandmother’s violin recital and to a line at a transportation center, Kiku experiences a longer displacement to the camp at the Tanforan Racetrack. There, she’s assigned to a stable next to Ernestina and her parents. Kiku’s roommate, Aiko, guides her through the long lines, mess hall, roll call, and day-to-day life in the camp. After a transfer to the more permanent Topaz camp in Utah, Kiku gets to know firsthand the traumas, divided loyalties, and resistance that will continue to be felt for generations among the nikkei. Kiku Hughes writes in her Author’s Note, “History and memory have tremendous power to heal us and give us the tools we need to know ourselves and navigate the world.” This beautifully rendered story is definitely one of these tools; its readers will learn from and about the experiences of Japanese Americans.
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This is an interesting way to view history, through the lens of a family member who lived it. The illustrations are beautiful and draw you into the story. If you like graphic novels that are limited on text, this has a moderate amount of text compared to other historical graphic novels. This graphic novel is important in showing the decidedly undemocratic way that Japanese Americans were treated during WWII. This is a high-interest novel, and tells a story that we need to explore.
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In this graphic novel, our narrator, Kiku doesn't know that much about her family history. As she is with her mom one day, she is suddenly displaced in time, back to her grandmother's youth. It goes back and forth in time a few times, until she is transported to a Japanese Internment camp with her grandmother for a much longer period of time. The book is based off the author's real family history.  An interesting way to look at the past and present.
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Displacement is an incredibly strong work by author/illustrator Kiku Hughes that blends fantasy with history. Protagonist Kiku is effectively portrayed first as a sullen teenager who does not feel a strong connection to her heritage, who then gains understanding and through "displacement" into the past of her grandmother, particularly her time spent living in and moving between internment camps for Japanese Americans during World War II. A recommended book not only for teens, but for anyone interested in this period of history.
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Displacement is a clarifying and at times, heart-breaking, fictional account of growing up in the Japanese American internment camps, as portrayed through a modern-day teenager. The illustrations are soothing, belaying the message - "Never Again." Definitely read this!
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I loved this story so much. It was such an interesting take on time traveling, and the art was very well done. I didn’t know very much about Japanese-American incarceration camps, so I felt like I learned a lot reading this story. I really appreciated how the author highlighted the effects of generational and communal trauma and how sometimes we strip parts of ourselves and culture away in hopes of self-preservation. I highly recommend people read this graphic novel!
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An interesting spin on historical fiction, and the displacement of our main character to unfamiliar circumstances allow the reader to learn and explore along with Kiku. I enjoyed the realization Kiku goes through in her connection to her family, and the reasons her family have distanced themselves from their Japanese heritage, as many Japanese Americans may have following the WWII era.
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A beautifully illustrated version of what may have happened in the Japanese internment camps. Centered around Kiku, the granddaughter of Ernestina, who was at camp Topaz in Utah. Kiku, suddenly travels back in time to be interred in the same place as her grandmother. The frustrations and unfairness of the camps is evident. At the same time the resilience of the people affected is on display as well. This title also warns against letting history repeat itself. We are living in difficult times where old rhetoric is becoming popular again. We have to fight back against it.
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This graphic novel revisits a time in American history that has been mostly overlooked, the internment camps of Japanese Americans during World War II. This book could be shared with Takei's They Called Us Enemy. In Displacement the main character becomes "displaced" into history and is placed into her late grandmother's story of being in an internment camp during the 1940s. There are details that show the struggles each of these people faced while living in the camps including displacement and being moved while treated unfairly. This was a part of history that I knew very little about, but recently have been exposed to several similar titles that helped open my eyes. This one is easily accessible to all teens. The author is also the illustrator basing this on her own family history. Netgalley gave me a review copy for free.
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Simply incredible. Gorgeous art and a clear personal connection that deepens the story. Put this on all the best of lists now.
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This is an amazing narrative giving an insight into the World War II-era Japanese internment camps. Despite being part fiction part real life, there is much to learn. The graphic novel is beautifully illustrated which will captivate readers. The further reading section at the end is also a nice addition to those wishing to learn more about this period in history. Highly recommend!
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