Cover Image: The Times I Knew I Was Gay

The Times I Knew I Was Gay

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Member Reviews

The art is great and the message that you come out many times in many ways over your life is well-meaning and important, but the meandering narrative really didn't grab me. It felt disjointed.
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a very relatable memoir about coming out and coming to terms with your sexuality. i saw myself in the pages and would definitely recommend this to any fan of graphic memoirs!
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The Times I Knew I Was Gay follows Ellie who is questioning herself and if or how she will fit in. Ellie wears black, obsessed with willow from Buffy the Vampire Slayer. (I mean who doesn’t love willow!) we get to see many stages of Ellie's life, how she developers as a person. I did enjoy the characters, Ellie is funny and real. I felt that this was good, good themes about being yourself, relationships, and friendships. The only thing I didn't like was I want more. I don’t know what is missing but I just feel like something is missing. I did enjoy that we see so many different stages. I also like how it has the theme that sometimes people do come out again and again but mostly that you don't have to have an identity to be able to fall in love.
I enjoyed the art. The art style felt very Ellie and I liked that the art fit her and her story. This is a cute read with art and characters that are easy to fall for.
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The Times I Knew I Was Gay was an eye-opening experience and it’s a book that all teens and young adults need to read. No matter who you are attracted to, you need to read this book because it shows how we are all trying to be ourselves no matter what exactly that means and it’s really okay. I’m not gay, but this book has shown me what my friends probably went through and I have a better understanding now and that’s the point. We need to read other perspectives from own so we can understand and respect one another.
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I wasn't sure what to expect from this memoir, as it seemed quite short and simple. But actually that ended up being its main strength: it's super to the point in the way it tells the story, but still packs a real emotional punch, and I found it extremely relatable.
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I really wanted to like this book but unfortunately I could not get into it. I do not think this was the one for me. The premise was super interesting, but towards the end to me it just fell apart.
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This was a great graphic memoir about the struggles of identity in a heteronormative world. Questioning your sexuality is hard when there is a perceived default that everyone should fall in and I feel like Crewes captured that perfectly in her illustrations and commentary. I really appreciated her story and know that many young people will benefit from this memoir being out there and will be able to relate to Crewes story.
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A lovely exploration of what it means to discover oneself in a world that is not often keen about finding out who you really are. What I liked about this one was the art - it was simple and not busy, but still conveyed very clearly the dynamics of emotion and dialogue.
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I loved this story. It felt so real and relatable to not only my queer experience, but so many of the ones I've heard of.
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I was unable to finish this in time before it expired but from the part I read I loved the art and it was a great story. I fully plan to check this out from my library, since we have purchased it and fully devote my attention to it. Great book from the first 20 pages!
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The entire experience of reading The Times I Knew I Was Gay felt like peeking into someone's diary comic. Charming artwork with fluid lines and just enough details. This book is humorous and very relatable. In my own head I changed the name to "All The Times I SHOULD Have Known I Was Gay".
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This book was super squee! The way Crewes tells her story feels like she's your friend, telling you her story over tea. Coming out is not something I've experienced, but Crewes makes it relatable. I was so happy when she finally came out to herself, and accepted who she was. My favorite part was the author picture in the back, because she just looks so happy! I know the reality is that a lot of people don't have a happy coming out story. I know that not everyone has the supportive family and friends she had, and I hope this will change. I hope that humans can stop finding arbitrary reasons to hate and be mean to each other. In the meantime, we have sweet, inspirational memoirs like this, and that's wonderful.
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I was unable to read this book on any of my devices with any clarity.  It seems to have downloaded in a manner that was not linear.  It jumped from one random page to another.  I hope it was my devices or me but there was no narrative line at all and I had to infer what it was saying.  The pages were numbered but not in order.  I am hoping that was not intentional.  I think I would have really liked this book if I could have read it the way I think it was written.  I also think it would be a terrific title for a teen collection but I had so much difficulty trying to make sense of it that I finally gave up.  The pages showed up split, too.  Too bad.  I would really have liked to read this to see if it was as good as I thought it was.  I'm giving this 4 stars in hopes that it was as good as I think.
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I loved the simple illustrations! Crewes makes her journey really relatable, sweet, and hopeful. I'm excited to share this memoir with both teens and adults.
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I enjoyed this sweet, gentle 90s coming out and coming of age story. I really connected with the character's confusion, but I think a lot of people will find the diary-style writing a bit disjointed and not super catchy from the start. I think this is the perfect sort of slow, dreamy wondering that captures the kind of tween/teen/young adult ennui that lots of us queer folk experienced.
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A really thoughtful, realistic narrative of coming out - both to oneself and the world. I would recommend for young adults and teens comfortable with the topic of sex.
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I really, really wanted to enjoy this book but there was just something about it that I couldn't get into. More than anything it's not the kind of art style that I usually prefer in graphic novels so I was somewhat lost from the beginning. Then I just found the narrator to be a bit insufferable.
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I always enjoy titles like this because it is nice to read about the variety of ways people figure out their sexuality. It is good to see that there is no one way to be gay and to figure it out, which is an important thing that I want to make sure the patrons can see for themselves. I also liked it because its art and story were so simple and quick to read. I liked being able to speed through it. I didn't want to stop reading it.
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Eleanor Crewes has a style very reminiscent of Noelle Stevenson, back when she was simply known as "gingerhazing" and drew fan comics about Thranduil being the Elven King of Parties and embarrassing his son, Legolas, in front of his new college bro friends, particularly Gimli. All of this is really to say, it brought me back to a different time in my life. A time where I was a young, queer university student reading webcomics and having a whole lot of anxiety. I saw a lot of myself in Eleanor. We dressed similarly in university, had similar interests; it's easy to relate to her. I was engaged very easily.

The delivery here is just effortless, even though logically we know it must have been somewhat painstaking. Eleanor feels like your friend or your sister, telling you her story of how she slowly came to the realization that she's gay. The art is stylish and matches the effortless voice of the narrative. There are a lot of coming out narratives, but they are overwhelmingly shadowed by "I knew since I was a child that I was not straight" or "I figured it out in adolescence but had to hide it for my survival in a hostile environment" or "I came to the realization and came out to all my loved ones, most of whom accept me and even told me that they've known for the majority of my life but never said anything." Rarely do we get to hear the fleshed out story of someone who just didn't question why they were never as enthusiastic about relationships with the opposite sex and how "coming out" is a process. As queer people, we're kind of constantly coming out in different facets of our lives to varying degrees but rarely will you get a story about that; nevermind one that can really engage young readers who might be questioning themselves right now. Moreso, it talks about how the realization can be gradual over a long period of time. We are so indoctrinated into heteronormative culture that many young people don't question if they even feel attraction to people of any gender really; most of us just went on dating the people of the gender that wasn't our own. I think for young women/femmes this is particularly true. Eleanor really makes this just so easy to follow and engaging the whole way through. I definitely know a lot of people who also could identify with this story.
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A wonderful way to spend an afternoon - Eleanor is kind to her younger self, and I loved the references to pop culture and how they shaped her view of herself.
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