Cover Image: Guilty Admissions

Guilty Admissions

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Member Reviews

In a world where people think the rules don’t apply will be vulnerable to the likes of Mark Sanger. He orchestrated the big college enrollment scandal. By getting coaches from top schools such as Harvard Yale USC in Stamford to lie insane interest in a particular student for their sports curriculum, It would make that student a shoe in for admission. When he couldn’t get a coach from a certain school then he would just blatantly lie on an application from saying they invented an app to starting a nonprofit. The lies were limitless and anything went at least it did until he got caught. Before we get into my thoughts on the book overall, let me just say the first chapter had me sweating while reading about how hard it is to get in to good schools despite your great great point average only calls me anxiety and I couldn’t wait to be done with it. I think I should’ve waited until after my daughter graduates to read this book lol! Having said that this book was so interesting from beginning to the authors notes at the end. It is always amazing to me the thought processes of people with Uber amounts of money in the rules that they think do not apply to them. This is evident from preschool to primary school every stage is competition for the next stage. This is a lot of stress that to me seems pointless. I think people try to use their money to cover up whatever they believe this lacking in their child or at least that is what they seem to want to do. I couldn’t imagine stressing over what preschool my child would go to and whether it will lead to Harvard admission in the long run. I love to see how the other half lives just to remind myself how lucky I am to live with a half I do. This was a very interesting book and I highly recommend it. Everyone who watches the news should know about the college admission scandal Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin were both found guilty of obtaining Mr. Sanger‘s quote services“ if you love to see how the other half lives in fails at it you should read this book I was given this book by net Gally and I am leaving this review voluntarily please forgive any mistakes as I am blind and dictate my review but all opinions are definitely my own.
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I was able to read this for free thanks to Net Galley, although that does not affect my opinion of the actual book. I’ve always been intrigued by the whole college scandal that went down a couple years ago, especially because I didn’t fully ever look into it. I just read the headlines on Facebook news and I’m magazines. When I saw this book on Net Galley, I knew I wanted to read it and delve more into what happened. Maybe it’s just because I read this through a kindle, but the layout was weird to me. Throughout the story, the text was written fully in big bold letters which got on my nerves as it made it a little hard to focus. The spacing of it was also a bit messed up. It could just be because it was originally an advanced copy (although it is now published), but I just figured I should mention that about the specific edition I read. Unfortunately, I was unable to finish this book (which is something I always hate to do) as it was a little too factual for me. Don’t get me wrong, I’m aware that the book is supposed to be this way, however it read a little to textbookey. I’m giving this a 3 star rating because I believe that while I couldn’t get into it, some people may enjoy it.
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This book was just incredible! I picked it up as a fan of investigative journalism as well as my love for all things academia and I was not disappointed! Well researched and well designed coupled with lovely writing and interesting facts makes this book incredibly readable and very hard to put down! This is exactly what I always hope for when picking up a book of this sorts. 

Highly recommend this book for anyone looking for an engrossing read. Though there has been a lot of coverage of the Varsity Blues scandal already, author Nicole LaPorte charts new territory to explore the psychological motivations of the key players and the social effects of the entire tutoring-industrial complex.

Thank you so much to netgalley and publishers for providing an advanced e-copy. I was elated to be chosen to not only honestly review this book but to get to experience it for myself and without netgalley this may have gotten lost in my TBR pile. DO NOT LET THAT HAPPEN! If you have any interest in this subject or in investigative journalism at all this book is the perfect choice for you!
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This book was very informative and provided a lot of background for the Varsity Blues college scandal. It isn't something I would typically read, but it sounded interesting. While very informative, there were so many names and so much information that I found myself a little confused at times and I honestly just couldn't remember who most of the people were. If you are interested in learning more about the college scandals, this is a great book. I am honestly completely shocked how corrupt the system is in regards to education. They say that money doesn't buy everything, but I feel like that's not much of a true statement. Clearly money can buy you much more than people knew. It's a shame that there are so many smart and intelligent individuals out there working their butts off and not having a chance in hell to be able to attend such a prestigious well known college because their lacking in the financial department. It makes me sick. What's even worse is, I doubt that most of the students who's parents bought their way into their schools could care less about it or even realize how fortunate they are to be given such an opportunity or even have said opportunities offered to them. I'm not sure I would read something like this again, but I did take away a decent amount from this book. Thank you Netgalley, Nicole LaPorte, and Twelve for the opportunity to read and review this book. I'm rating this ⭐⭐⭐💫
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I was given an advanced copy of Nicole LaPorte’s “Guilty Admissions: The Bribes, Favors, and Phonies Behind the College Cheating Scandal” to read and review through NetGalley.

Working in colleges admissions, I was particularly interested in how LaPorte might cover this story compared to the Korn & Levitz book, “Unacceptable,” that came out last year. Ultimately it was a decent retelling of the athletics recruitment scandal by an author who is able to hold a reader’s interest.

I found LaPorte’s “Guilty Admissions” to seem a bit more sympathetic or defensive of those implicated in the cheating scandal. It had a very California-centric vibe and, as an East Coast reader I felt lacking the context, at times, to see things exactly the way the author described. That said, it was a solid nonfiction book that describes some of the detail behind the Varsity Blues scandal.

I would recommend this book to anyone who is interested in learning more about this scandal.
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This non-fictional staple centering around the College Admission Scandal, which has been on the forefront of Gen X and Gen Z's minds these days, painted a well researched and well developed novel. While the pages delve into depths of why "Varsity Blues" happened in the first place, the author also managed to make a mysterious, riveting narrative out of an elite lie. They painted the head of the scandal with empathy. Which was surprising and took me into his mind in a psychological way I wasn't expecting. The author also took bold facts weaving them with suspense that kept me turning pages. Despite the fact that I had read the news and followed the case, I found a lot of new research. Although it was researched non-fiction, this beauty read as fiction due to the compelling and well written narrative. If you're going to pick up any juicy, deep "scandalous" non-fiction, pick up this one!
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Definitely interesting reading. Very well researched account of the college bribes that became famous because it included two well known actresses. One took responsibility and the other not so much.

Sad that parents wanted to buy their kids a place in school. Guess they didn't realize that their kids were taking the place of someone else's kid who deserved it but alas didn't have wealth.
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3 for neutral, while I’m very interested in this case, I for some reason could not get into this book.  I tried a couple times, but admits I’m a very moody reader.  Will update review if able to finish at a later date.
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“Varsity blues is about the inequities of class, and how it plays out in college admissions. It is a story about the power and entitlement of the rich in a country where the wealth divide is strained to a breaking point.” - Author’s notes

All I can say is that it saddens me to see these parents believing the only way for their kids to get into college is by cheating and how that can affect those kid’s confidence for the rest of their lives. 

The book drew information from a variety of sources and gave a thorough description of the college admissions process.

I would recommend this to anyone who has seen the varsity blues documentary or is simply intrigued by college admissions scam.
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TWO-CENT TUESDAY

Below are a few (somewhat) brief $.02 opinions about books I've read or listened to recently but don't have the opportunity to review in full. Many of these titles I enjoyed as much or more than those that got the full court press. I hope you'll consider one or two for your own TBR stack if they strike your fancy whether they struck mine or not.

*  *  *

GUILTY ADMISSIONS, by Nicole LaPorte

A thoroughly researched and detailed account of the college admissions scandal that caught several big Hollywood names in its snare. I found the audio a great way to listen to the tale, and the meat of the story was fascinating. It started with a lot of background detail that seemed a tad superfluous, but overall I enjoyed this account of aholes aholing.
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I previously enjoyed the Netflix documentary on this topic. The college admissions scandal was an insight into the lives of the rich and privileged and was gripping to watch it unravel and unfold. I usually like non fiction accounts of frauds and scandals, like that of Bad Blood. However, here I didn’t feel engaged by all the information. It may have been thoroughly researched but for me as a reader, I didn’t find it took hold of the story and presented in a way that allowed me to settle into story and get hooked.
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Review to come for Guilty Admissions by Nicole LaPorte 

As a development officer in higher education, this story hits home for me. I can't wait to read this entertaining exposé on how the other half gets in and tells the shockingly true story of the Varsity Blues scandal, and all of the crazy parents, privilege, and con men involved.

Thanks to the publisher and netgalley for an advanced copy in exchange for my honest review.
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This was an interesting book. I had heard about this scandal but enjoyed reading the stuff that was left out of the media and news. It didn't feel like it was too much information but gave enough for you to really know what happened. It's crazy to think about what these parents will do to get their children into the "right" schools or to help get them ahead in life.
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This is well written book of the education system and what was done to cheat other hard working individuals of an education
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Guilty Admissions provides a frightening and fascinating insight into what extremes some (in this case, predominantly American or US-based) "lawn-mower" parents will go to in order to help their children secure coveted spots at particular universities. Ethics be damned, many participants have been so blinded by what they call love or fear, they have been happy to blame the man at the centre of this particular scandal rather than taking responsibility for their own decisions
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If you’re looking for a full overview of the Varsity Blues case, I recommend the Netflix doc. This book does a good job of putting that information into the broader conversation about educational privilege and entitlement. Really gripping (read it in less than 24 hours) and I think should be required reading for parents.
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Comprehensive and balanced examination of the college admissions scandal.  Lots of fun to read in a schadenfreude sort of way.

Thanks to NetGalley for providing an ARC copy for my review.
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An in-depth recount of the college admissions scandal that rocked Hollywood. It was a wild read and more coverage than I expected. I highly recommend if you want all the details.
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This book is a very in depth account of the college admissions scandal. I would recommend it to friends.
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A very detailed account of the Varsity Blues college admissions cheating scandal, this book covers the general college admissions craziness in this country, and the lengths to which hypercompetive, privileged helicopter parents will go to try to assure that their children have everything they could ever want. 

Though well-written and thoroughly researched, this book is for those who really want every last detail. I have personally preferred exploring this topic through other formats, like essays and podcasts, At times I felt bogged down by all the information.
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