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The Night Always Comes

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Member Reviews

I had never read Willy Vlautin before and now I know he is too dark for me! I was interested in the characters and the story all the way until the violence and crime started happening and for some reason that took it out of my wheelhouse. I can bet he has a great and established audience, I'm just not part of it. Thank you!
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I found myself truly sympathizing with Lynette. Vlautin succeeds in creating a relatable and realistic character that the reader (at least this reader) really cares about. I would add that the novel is incredibly timely. The only real criticism I have of this book (and its really detracted from my enjoyment) is the awkward bits where characters provide backstory through lengthy and improbable conversations that just do not seem to make sense within the reality of the rest of the novel. These sections seem like the author is trying to inform the readers of backstory but it comes across as inelegant to put this information into conversations that seem to come out of the blue, lengthy, and disruptive to the flow of the novel.
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Thank you to NetGalley for an e-ARC of The Night Always Comes by Willy Vlautin. 
The Night Always Comes is a depressing story of a dysfunctional family being pushed out of Portland because of economic changes. People on the fringes, blue-collar, those with emotional issues can no longer secure housing or a future. Willy Vlautin portrayed the situation with accuracy, making the reader feel Lynette's hopelessness. A sad, tragic book but a necessary read for privileged Americans.
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The Night Always Comes is destined to be one of my all-time favorite novels, with pulse pounding terror and suspense, intricate plotting, family drama, and a main character who is brave, loyal, kind, tough as nails, and horribly broken. The incredible audiobook is NOT TO BE MISSED. Narrator Christine Lakin is a super star.
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The Night Always Comes
by Willy Vlautin
Lynette is a character you want to succeed. She tries, doesn't always make the best choices, but she tries. And it's not just for her, it's for her mother and most importantly, her brother. My heart went out to her over and over. Vlautin shows just how mental illness can affect people and haunt them even when they are trying to do what's right.
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I absolutely loved this book. It was pretty depressing though. Lynette was a complicated and wonderfully crafted character. I was rooting for her every step of the way. I loved how the author slowly revealed the things that warped and damaged her but also made her a survivor. She would routinely put her self down but what she lack in book smarts (or so she thought) she made up in resourcefulness. She got her self out of situations that could have ended badly for her. And that is why I had hope for her as I got to the last page. And I needed that hope considering how hopeless everything seemed. I recommend this book wholeheartedly, and I'll be looking into more books by Willy Vlautin.
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Vlautin's newest title hits hard describing classism and the limits we are pushed to just to survive. 

Vlautin's writing is so real and descriptive, you can feel Lynette's anxiety and desperation to acquire some necessary stability. The scenes with her brother were personal, and equally touching and painful as she tries to navigate the impossible caregiver role she must take. It's a hard book to read. But considering how many people are struggling in lives just like Lynette's, it should be hard to read. It should needle at something inside us as we learn and understand how hard it is for some people to survive despite all their best efforts and the desperate lengths they go to. And ultimately, that's exactly what this book did.
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For the love of humanity, this was a hard, emotional read. I applaud Willy Vlautin, which could possibly be one of my new faves. He captures the hope of the American people, but the unattainable goal for many. Lynette is trying to find her place in the world with her hard work ethics. With so much at stake at only 30 years old, she provides for her special needs brother. Hoping to save enough money for a down payment on a home that they have been renting. Hoping to have her mom's help with the money, instead she spends the money on a new car. 
In a neighborhood that once was labeled as a poor urban area, has been changed through gentrification. A very controversial topic with the influx of more affluent residents and businesses changing the facade of the area and displacing many of the ones that were already having a difficult time surviving. 
Depression sets in as her world becomes bleak with desperation to make unwise decisions. She could settle for less than safe neighborhoods she could afford, but not what they want to do. With a fine line drawn in the community with poverty and criminalization, some find themselves crossing it just to survive. This book captures her bleak life and the working people and their economic struggles.
"You cease to distinguish between right and wrong. You can no longer see clearly what is good and what is bad."  
Good job, Willy Vlautin. I can't do this book justice.
Thank you,NetGalley for this incredible ARC for exchange of my honest opinion.
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Lynette works multiple jobs, some legal and some not, saving up her money to help her mother with a loan so the two of them can buy the house they’re currently living in with Lynette’s developmentally disabled brother Kenny. When Lynette’s mother drops a bombshell on her, she decides to cash in her chips, so to speak, and takes two days to track down and collect all of the money she’s owed, revisiting her past as she veers between situations that escalate into violence again and again. This book is fine; Vlautin’s writing is extremely deliberate and there’s charm in the specific intentionality of his pacing, the very calm step by step narration of everyone’s actions. I found I wasn’t a fan of the pages-long diatribes Vlautin puts in his character’s mouths.
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Willy Vlautin delivers his view of greed, gentrification and ‘takers’ in a two-day two-night punch.  The characters express Vlautin’s thoughts of what is wrong in this world,  His main character, Lynette, is the one altruistic character who, ironically, will do anything to get what is rightfully owed to her.  Can she use past ‘takers’  to make a future?  The author offers us a look at the dark side of life and allows one light to shine, but how many wrongs make a right?   This book is as uplifting as a pandemic.  It may become your next book club selection because it will create a lot of conversation!
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Oh my goodness! I had to take a break about halfway through this book because of the anxiety! Great writing, non-stop "OMG! What is she doing NOW?" action.  Whew........
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Vlautin paints an intimate and heartbreaking portrait of a family struggling with the gentrification of their Portland neighborhood and their relationships with each other.
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The Night Always Comes by Willy Vlautin is a very highly recommended, heartbreaking, working class drama of greed impacting the life of a young woman.

Lynette, 30, has been working three jobs for three years and is exhausted. She is trying to gather the money for a down payment on the dilapidated rental house she lives in with her mother, and her developmentally disabled brother Kenny in Portland, Oregon. The owner wants to sell the house and is going to give them a good deal if they want to buy it. Lynette has a bad credit rating, but if her mother can provide some of the down payment and cosign the loan, the three of them will have the security they have never had before and a chance to fix up the house. That was the plan, but at the last minute her mother backs out, putting money down on a new car instead, setting Lynette out to collect on the money she has loaned others in order to get the whole down payment on her own.

This brief novel is set over just two days and nights and follows Lynette's quest for the money they need. The night is a long, tortuous, violent, and desperate hunt that puts her in contact with greedy men, prostitution, hustlers, cons, abusers, users, and others who prey upon the vulnerable. As she is trying to gather the money she needs, she is also keeping track of how easily her car starts. As the night goes on flashbacks will tell Lynette's backstory which provides even more depth and understanding of what this young woman has endured.

Lynette is a character you will fiercely care about and worry over her safety. I can't remember a character whose story totally consumed me like Lynette's did. Obviously, to care so much about a fictional character clearly shows that this character is very well-developed. This is a novel of the working class and how the American Dream seems unattainable; for many people working two jobs and wearing yourself down is a daily fact of life.

The writing was absolutely flawless. As we follow Lynette in her search, The Night Always Comes seized my attention and evoke all the emotions. The ending was perfect and provided a measure of hope. Even though the plot seems simple, this is one of the best books I have read. It will certainly be on my list of top novels of the year and I will be seeking out and reading other novels by Vlautin.
Disclosure: My review copy was courtesy of HarperCollins.
After publication the review will be posted on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.
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Real estate prices are rising throughout the US, but nowhere more so than in Portland. Lynette’s dream is to purchase the rundown home she, her mother, and her mentally challenged older brother have lived in for years. She has worked two jobs, scrimped and saved for a decade, and even worked part time as a high-dollar escort to get the down payment. But her dream is jerked from her  when her mother reveals she has no intention of buying a home and asks Lynette to leave and take her brother with her. Lynette is desperate, and as a result she enters into a downward spiral that may cost her everything, her freedom, her sanity, and perhaps her life. 

This gritty look at the frustration and hopelessness in too many lives exposes the seamy underbelly of society and the despair and betrayal it often entails. Those who avoid sex and violence in their reading will want to go elsewhere, but readers who do not object to raw, sometimes ugly realism may enjoy this short novel.
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Life is hard but if you set a goal, you have something to work for. Lynette’s dream was to buy the house that she, her mother and disabled brother have lived in for many years. Yet as the time comes her mother makes it clear this is not what she wants, Lynette’s world collapses and she is left to figure out her future.
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The book held my interest and I wanted to know what happened to Lynnette, and how she would end up. It was a rather depressing book, and although Lynnette grew and learned, most of the time it felt like her life was hopeless and sad. The characters were well drawn, and the dialogue seemed honest and realistic, except for her mother's long winded discussions.
The one detail that most annoyed me was that every time Lynnette started her car, I was told how many times she tried before it started. I get that when she finally got a "new" car, it started on the first try, but to be told countless times before that, that her car never started right away was too repetitious.
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My review just got eaten but this one was so good!! Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for this early copy in exchange for a review. 

This is not a happy story and it doesn’t get tied up in a bow, but it’s definitely a real story.
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This is the first novel that I have read by Willy Vlautin. I enjoyed the novel and felt the flawed characters were well developed. The main character Lynette takes readers on an emotional rollercoaster on her journey to achieve the "American Dream"  throughout the story that takes place over the course of a few days. She scrambles to come up with money to buy the run down house from her landlord because her mother has backed out of the arrangement that was made a few years earlier.
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A woman's plan to purchase her family home falls through, leading her on a dangerous overnight quest to acquire the money before it's too late. 

Lynette's struggle to make ends meet while working multiple jobs and also caring for her developmentally disabled brother is realistic and disheartening. Mundane events are described in minute detail which, while perhaps an accurate depiction of the drudgery of her daily routine, gives the narrative a plodding quality. Backstory-heavy dialogue also acts a drag.

The pace picks up when Lynette tries to recoup an $8,000 loan she gave a work friend -- an implausible scenario in itself given her own financial situation -- making her the target of various unsavory characters who want the money and more besides. Thankfully there's a glimmer of hope for Lynette at the end of this rather bleak and grinding tale.
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This book was extremely painful to read. That's how good it is. When things get bad, they just get worse. The whole thing was rainy.  The whole night was a nightmare. The heroine just kept going, however, through beatings, punches, and broken glass. With absolutely no one on her side she persevered in one night to get what she needed, what she deserved,  I wouldn't recommend this to someone with a soft heart. The abuse in this woman's life is so unbelievable you have to believe it could happen. I'm glad she's a good pastry chef. It means she has a good heart.
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