Cover Image: One Last Stop

One Last Stop

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Member Reviews

This time loop f/f romance was a delightful, charming gem of a read! I loved the queerness of it, including the development of queer friendships and community for the loner main character, August. And at the heart of the book, the developing romantic relationship between August and Jane was perfectly paced and crackled with chemistry. Warm, sexy, and fun!
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I'll be perfectly honest, I requested this book simply because I liked another book by the author and I didn't read the description.  I had a little trouble getting into this one and the concept of Jane being displaced from the 1970s.  Eventually I got into it and enjoyed trying to help solve the mystery of Jane.
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I love all of Casey McQuiston’s work and I especially loved this one - it felt like prose wise it lived in the same arena as RWRB - but still stood on its own. I fell in love with the characters and hope to see another book featuring them!
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Have you ever read a book and like midway through the book you realize this is one of your new favorites? It felt like a hug and so personal even with not having experienced really any of these things besides friendship. The found family is done wonderfully. The mystery aspect is so fun and done well, kept me wondering till the end. My one piece I don’t like is at the very end in regards to Jane’s name but I am very happy to ignore that for the actual book.
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I just was not impressed with this and I had some really high hopes. The characters seemed a little flat to me and I wanted a little more character-building.
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This book. 

I won't rehash the book summary since so many have done this before. But this book really hit me deeply. Maybe because I was born and raised in the NYC area. Maybe because I came of age during the AIDS crisis and feel deeply the disconnect between young queer folks today and the history of lgbtq folks, especially NYC's queer history. But it's also a story of finding yourself, and finding a community to nurture you and give you space to simply be. 

There's a lot of great representation here, but especially bi rep, which is so important because bi folk experience erasure in both straight and queer communities and it can be hard to see that in books given how pervasive this is in day-to-day life.  But honestly, the book contains a wonderful panorama of queerness in general and contextualizes it's history in NYC. This sensitivity to history is evident in the character of Jane, who is stuck in the 70s and for whom the events of that decade are not history. It's such a gorgeous love letter to queerness, which I find moving and engrossing. 

But most of all, this is a book about love and all the ways people can love each other and frankly, it's rather wonderful. 

If I could give the book more stars, I would. Lovely, lovely read.
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Thank you to the publisher, author, NetGalley for a copy of this book in exchange for honest feedback. I finished both the e-arc and a physical copy of this book. It is outside of my typical genres that I like to read. However, I have heard good things about the author and the publisher (of course!) usually selects good books. This book has definetly become a hit on social media. I think that the one thing that stood out to me about this book is its resonating plot for both queer and heterosexual readers -- this is a mark of a great book in my opinion. It must mean that the plot and characters are not just "for one" group. They're marketable to any reader. It has a cute storyline and a great cover.
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Maybe 4.5? McQuiston took all of the best parts aspects and writing of Red, White & Royal Blue and somehow presented something completely different but equally delightful.
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I found the suspension of disbelief requirement to be a little too high in some of the elements of this story. There was also some incredibly erratic behavior from the characters that was never full problematized or discussed. Overall, I enjoyed the book but I wouldn't recommend it to others.
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Casey McQuiston delivers another sugar sweet book with a cast of characters that are both engaging and endearing. I was impressed by how all the storylines came together here, and really fell in love with some of the side characters throughout the book. I loved the inclusion of history, but I wish we could have seen more of it -Jane's reaction to anecdotes is commented on but not seen "on page," which I felt was a missed opportunity. Certain parts of the book were a little slow, but still a cute and fluffy read.
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First up, I really liked Casey's first book (as did a lot of other people), but I didn't bring a lot of expectations into this one because while they are both romance, the paranormal elements here make it a different beast altogether. I think it was best I didn't bring in expectations or I would have been a bit more underwhelmed than I ended up actually being. 

August has moved to New York City to take another crack at a different college. She's independent and not good about opening up or being vulnerable. She finds an apartment with a true assembly of quirky, unapologetically queer people and gets a job at a Brooklyn staple diner. As she is settling into her new life in the Big Apple, she has a chance encounter with Jane, possible the most dreamy, badass lesbian in existence, on the Q train. Eventually, August figures out that Jane is trapped in a sort of time slip, and has been "out of time" since the mid-1970s. August makes it her mission to help Jane figure out who she is, how she got trapped on the Q train and how to get back home in the right time. Along the way, August falls head over heels for Jane. 

There is nothing truly wrong with this book. In fact, there are SO many things that are right with it. But unfortunately, what I thought was wrong with it makes this a not-great read for me. 

First, the great: August's group of friends. Her roommates are so vivid and lifelike. Niko is possibly the coolest character I've come across in a while, and he is amazing trans rep as well. The storyline between Wes and the accountant/drag queen across the hall Isaiah was amazing (I looked forward to every morsel of their plotline). The description of all the queer spaces and events that August goes to: drag brunch, Christmas in July, the fundraising party -- they were all so vibrant and amazing and it made me ache for something similar in my own life. Jane, too, is a knockout of a character. Brash and brave and tough and charismatic, Jane busts through August's hard shell and August really didn't stand a chance; falling in love was inevitable . 

This book is also a clear love letter to the city of New York City. Casey lives there and I am sure there's a lot here that Casey experiences and loves. A lot of research and time went into capturing the spirit of the subway and Flatbush. The Q is practically a character of its own. 

Unfortunately, August was my least favorite character. There was a bit too much telling about her personality and not enough showing to prove it true. She says she doesn't like to let anyone in or that she doesn't like "magic" in places. But she doesn't really fight the community of her roommate or Billy's Pancakes. She throws herself into helping Jane, a big ole stranger who she has no obligation to. She also does the whole "kissing for science" rigmarole with Jane, which is a trope I am TIRED of. 

I was a bit exhausted by the 75%/80% point, wanting the ending to happen already: I wanted the plan to help Jane to start and I wanted to know how both Jane's plot would resolve as well as the ongoing mystery of August's uncle, who has been missing since about the time Jane got out of time in the 1970s. I will say that in general, things are wrapped up pretty well and in a decently satisfactory method. 

Jane and August's uncle's timeline does intersect with a very real event in LGBT history: The UpStairs Lounge fire in New Orleans. It's a real event that happened and is a sad, dark part of both Louisiana's history and LGBT history. Casey inserts August's uncle into this very real event in a way that I wasn't entirely comfortable with but understood on a narrative level and on a "it's important to bring more light to this tragic event" sort of way. I think there's merit in debating the ethics of that sort of thing. A perhaps I more sensitive to the issue because the fire feels more immediate to me than, say, the made-up characters of "The Titanic" being put into that tragedy. 

Overall, it was a fun read with a lot to like. I just didn't fall in love with it as a whole. I would read more about Niko and Myla and Wes and Isaiah in a heartbeat, but I don't care to hear from August again.
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An absolutely charming time travel romance for queer people. I love the slow build. I love the characters. I love that the setting is the subway. I love the ending. I often wonder what it would be like to take someone who was queer in the past and bring them forward to the future. What a lovely romance novel. Fun read if you like time travel, queer romance, and happy endings. Thanks to Netgalley for an ARC in return for an honest review.
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I wanted to love this one but unfortunately, it just didn't live up to Red, White, and Royal Blue for me. The quirky background characters felt a bit too overdone and almost TOO quirky, that after a while they started to get annoying. I also just didn't click with the romance the way I wanted to!
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One Last Stop is a fun adult read with a little sci-fi twist. 
August is a 23-year old, bouncing from one university to the next trying to find a place to call home that feels right and an appropriate distance from her mother. 
Jane is a mysterious, sharp, young, Asian-American with a warm smile and willing to fight anybody who has a nasty word to say. She always seems to be on the train, drawing August in and completely changing her life. 
The gang is rounded out with Nico, a part-time psychic; Mila, a quirky artist-type with a big brain; Wes, a former trust fund kid who just wants to be himself and not a disappointment to everyone around him; and the staff at Pancake Billy's House of Pancakes. (As well as their neighbor, a drag queen named Annie Depressant who throws the biggest parties and is willing to step in to help without being asked.)
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A delightful book full of adventure, action, and thrills. Fun to read, engrossing world building, and very descriptive imagery made it feel like it was cinematic. It's hard to resist the story as it drives forward. Would recommend.
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I wanted to love this book. I expected to love this book. Sadly, this just did not work. Ultimately, there was a huge, glaring missed opportunity. I greatly disliked that the story was told only from August's perspective. I wanted to hear from Jane! It could have been a far richer experience with multiple perspectives. Also, sex on a NYC subway is just a hard pass.
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I absolutely loved this title; Red, White and Royal Blue was one of my favourite releases of its publication year, I've read it so many times and Casey's second book did not disappoint in any way. I loved August and Jane, their connection felt so palpable and I loved the way the science fiction twist worked out! Such an incredible cast of side characters, too. I can't wait to read more books from Casey in the future and they're an author we'd love to work with.
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This magical realism book is an amazing read!  I loved the characters, setting in the New York subway and would love to see a sequel.  Highly recommend!
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After Red, White, & Royal Blue I was really excited to learn that McQuiston would be doing an own voices WLW book. What I was not expecting was that this book would have a fantasy element, and that I would like it. The love interest are fun with just enough quirks to make them interesting but not overplayed. As a resident of Louisiana I loved the nod McQuiston paid to her home state. Overall, One Last Stop was a quick read that left me with those post romance butterflies.
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I wanted so much more from this book. After Red, White, and Royal Blue I had such high expectations that were unfortunately not met.
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