Cover Image: Walking for Water

Walking for Water

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Member Reviews

We forget, sometimes, that education equality is not the norm across the world. That in many places while girls aren't forbidden from education they are the ones who will be pulled out to assist with household chores, watch younger siblings, etc. In the case of this book, it is their cultural norm. No one questions that a t a certain age most girls will begin to miss school for chores. Not until a question encourages our protagonist to trade off with his sister. While either of them missing class is less than idea if they take it in turns at least it is fair. And when he persists in this habit it normalizes for his peers. A simple example of a small action starting a significant change.
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I loved this book! I appreciate water on tap and education much more.  A great look at how education and one person can make a difference in the world.
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Walking for Water by Susan Hughes is an adorable short children's book that gives you a history lesson, current lessons and a smile by the end of the book. Even though this book is for children, even adults can enjoy this positive story. Walking For Water made me as a reader excited to learn more about the Malawi culture and other African cultures. The illustrations are stunning and made this adorable story even more enjoyable. Walking for Water captured me with the telling of a true story.
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This is a good place to start teaching young children about gender and resource inequality. It's based on the true story of a Malawian boy who stepped up to help his sister carry water for their family so she wouldn't have to miss school every day. The target audience for this book is grades 2-5 but that feels a little high for me. I'd say it's geared more towards the K5-2nd grade crowd. Kids are capable of understanding difficult things and I think older kids deserve a more in-depth look at this topic that this book doesn't provide. Even for younger children, it's a good jumping-off point for further learning. It is sure to spark the desire in kids to do the work of bringing about a more equitable distribution of resources and access to education for all.  

Thanks to NetGalley and Kids Can Press for an advanced copy of this book.
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I absolutely adored this book! The younger generation will succeed where we failed. A must have for every book shelf!
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What a humbling story. even wonderful than I imagined. I read Anna from Tanzania's story by Melinda Gates where she was able to bring about a change in her village where men started helping out with the hard work of getting water from far, so she could take care of her infant.
When I saw that this was a similar story of kids, I was very intrigued. it is a very inspiring story. You will be surprised about brilliant little minds. Maybe change begins stronger with kids.
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Set in a small village in Malawi, Walking for Water is a story that talks about gender (in)equality, sacrifice, love. 

Through this story of a twin brother and sister, we see that boys and girls don't have the same rights and opportunities. But, Victor is smart, brave and he finds a way for his sister to attend school too, by making a small sacrifice. 

It's a testament to how even the smallest act, can inspire bigger, more important changes, not just in our own lives, but maybe for many other lives. All we have to do is be able to speak up and be selfless. 

This book is great for shedding light on the state around the world, opening the eyes of our little ones and bringing awareness to the bigger issues. To spark conversations that need to happen no matter where you are. To break the molds and be better.
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This is a story about Malawi kids, where the girls of certain age stop going to school and help the household chores instead. But the book then giving us an idea of equality on how boys and girls can share the responsibility. 

Not only in Malawi, but most Asian countries still have this practice, mostly those who lived far away from the cities. It is important for girls to have the minimum amount of education, if they're not allowed to further their studies, so they can at least live better.
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Based on a real event, this picture book tells the story of a Malawian boy, Victor, whose 8 year old sister has to stop going to school so she can spend her days carrying water from a river to their home. Victor decides to take her place every other day, allowing them both to attend school part time, sharing what they have learned each day, and motivating a friend to do the same with his own sister. 
Flat, primitive illustrations reflect the landscape, house, tools, toys and clothing of the region. Useful for discussions about gender equality and the power of individual actions to effect broader change.
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Our 5th graders study the hydrosphere and I have talked to them about water distribution around the world and how some people don't have easy access to water.  This book should make it easier for my students to relate to these people around the world who have to walk long distances for water.  Many of my students have brothers or sisters or cousins, and to have them realize that some people in a family get to go to school while other do not and that females are less educated because they are required to do chores, like fetching water, will be eye opening for many of them.  This book is straight forward and easy to understand without being too preachy. I will use this with my students.
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Let this book be available everywhere. I do mean EVERYWHERE!

This book is so damn important in teaching the kids and, yes specifically the adults, and more importantly, the parents to treat their children equally, to give them equal opportunities and treatment. Why must the girl child be treated any less?

Why must the girl child stop going to school just to fetch water miles away from home while her brother have to attend school when the family is facing a water crisis at home?


This book is amazing.

I love teachers who make education fun and real.

Kudos to the author and the artist! You made my day so special!

Thank you, publisher for the advance reading copy.
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Thank you NetGalley and Kids Can Press for the gifted egalley.
Walking for Water is the story of Linesi and Victor. These twins just turned 8, so Linesi is taking over the family water duties while her brother Victor goes to school. When Victor’s teacher begins to teach gender equality, Victor begins to think critically of gender equality or lack thereof in his own life.
Walking for Water is simultaneously one of the cutest books I’ve ever read and one of the most important books. This book is an easy story to follow with fun illustrations that help teach an important message of gender equality, I especially love how this book is based on a real story. I think this is a great book to begin conversations on gender equality and what it looks like in students lives. I will be purchasing a hard copy for my own classroom. I would highly recommend.
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Victor is seeing how different girls and boys were treated in the village. Since they were eight now, he went to school, while his sister, Linesi fetches water at least five times during the day with a bucket without going to school. Victor's teacher begins to speak about equality and asks the students to see how it is shown in their own lives. Victor comes up with a plan to allow it all to work out. No spoilers, but it just shows the love for family and the need for education. The illustrations is something that I also loved. You felt like you were there with Victor and Linesi in their everyday life.
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Walking for Water highlights the unequal access to education faced by many females in developing countries. Told from the perspective of a young boy, the story promotes empathy. It's the young boy and girl who come up with a solution to solve this problem, showing young people that they can create change. The writing at time feels a bit clunky, but the subject matter is presented in a way that can be grasped by young readers.
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I loved this book SO much! By looking at the title, I assumed that it would simply be a story about children walking for water, but was pleasantly surprised that the story was so much more.  This is such a fantastic resource to use with children to further develop their understanding about the world around them and help recognize the inequalities around us. As a kindergarten teacher in Chicago, I would love to use this book during our Who We Are Unit, where we study different communities that we are a part of including the world.  The illustrations and font are kid-friendly and engaging.  

I only wish that this book was available sooner for my class to read this year, but I'll have to wait patiently until June 1, 2021.  Thank you Netgalley and Citizen Kid for providing early digital access in exchange for an honest review.
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Walking for Water by Susan Hughes is delightfully inspiring from beginning to end.  It is a true story that opens our eyes to the gender inequality in Malwai, and is truly inspirational in its message of hope for a more equitable future.

When Victor and his twin sister Linesi turn eight years old, Linesi stops going to school so that she can fetch water and carry out other domestic tasks around the home.  As Victor continues with his education, he recognizes the unfairness of his twin being prevented from attending classes, and tries to teach her what he has learned each day.  But Linesi is too tired to learn, and Victor hatches a plan that will give the twins an equal opportunity to attain an education.  

This is a beautifully illustrated and inspiring story that will serve to open a dialogue with children about gender inequality in the world today.  

Many thanks to NetGalley and Kids Can Press for an ARC of this title.
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This fact-based story deals with gender inequality. Set in the southeast African country of Malawi, the book highlights how boys are given the opportunity to go to school and even play outside, while girls after age 8 are given chores and the responsibility of hauling fresh water.  When a pair of twins—a boy and a girl—experience this firsthand, the boy decides to make a change. A supportive teacher gets the boy thinking even more about this. This is an excellent book to use with young children to start a conversation about gender equality and the need for fresh water. More factual information would make this a stronger title.
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I got this on Netgalley in exchange for an honest review!

This is a really nice story, and I love the message and the extra context and resources provided! I think it's important with these picture books that are based on / inspired by true events. This is a perfect resource to use when talking about equality with children, and I can see myself using it in the future!
Would recommend this!
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I loved the story and how important equity was for the brother. I think this book could be a good conversation starter for how life is different in different places and how not everyone is treated the same way around the world.
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This is a beautiful, beautiful book! And in so many ways! It's inspiring, it's touching, it's relevant, and it's much needed!

Seeing the title reminded me of "A Long Walk to Water" by Linda Sue Park, and I was worried that this might be an equally emotionally-intensive story. But this turned out to be a wonderful surprise. I loved how little Victor thought of the perfect solution to help his twin sister Linesi to go to school instead of being stuck with the task for fetching water daily for the family. The illustrations are also fabulous. Recommended to one and all. We need more such books, and we need more such sensitive men in our society. A wholehearted 5 stars from me.
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