Cover Image: The Right to Sex

The Right to Sex

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Member Reviews

This thoughtful book of essays acts as a companion to Laura Bates' Men Who Hate Women. Srinivasan's use of intersectionality shows how essential it has become as a tool for examining sexual politics.
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"The Right to Sex" by Amia Srinivasan is a nonfiction work covering a wide range of topics on 21st century. feminism. This book was really interesting, and while it felt a bit academic at times, the topics therein left me thinking. I was particularly intrigued by the chapters "Talking to My Students About Porn" and "Sex, Carceralism, and Capitalism." Internet literacy is a topic that needs to be addressed more in general with a special focus on how sex is portrayed, especially since sexual education is often hugely inadequate. I also found a lot of value in the discussion about the conflict between feminism, the needs of women, and capitalism. I hope many people read this book.
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This book just wasn’t for me I guess. The concept and description were both up my alley, but the execution did my match for me. I found most of the chapters hard to follow. This was clearly a well researched book, but I struggled to match and follow the connections between a lot of the concepts within each chapter.
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Thank you to FSG and NetGalley for providing a free review copy! 

This book contains six essays that discuss sex and the way it relates to gender roles and norms in our society - Amia Srinivasan discusses topics such as the MeToo movement, incels, rape culture, student-professor relationships, sex work, and pornography. It is an outstanding collection that both relates familiar feminist issues and expands upon them. Each essay  was laid out carefully: first elaborating on the background and history of the issue within previous feminist waves before using solid sources to provide some new arguments, and perhaps, some solutions. I particularly thought “On Not Sleeping With Your Students” and the last essay, “Sex, Carceralism and Capitalism” were excellent. They both brought up some excellent points that I hadn’t realised or thought of myself as well as formulating some thoughts I had thought myself but not as eloquently. I thought the collection was quite nuanced and inclusive, and like Srinivasan was open for discussion. I will definitely seek out anything she writes next!
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Let's add this one to every feminist theory syllabus. The topics that Amia Srinivasan focuses on are not new to anyone, sexual assault, pornography, sexual desire, the power inequality of sex yet her argument of the new politics of sex and power in the #metoo generation is as sharp as a knife.  This writing will make you think, will make you angry, will make you cheer, and will make you question your own beliefs around sex, desire and power.  It is a book that had to be written and has to be read.

Thank you to NetGalley and Farrar, Straus and Giroux for the ARC
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A powerful book that analyzes some of the most complex and critically important dimensions of patriarchal oppression.  The writing is intense, the stories are confronting, and it is exceptionally well-informed and detailed. Reminiscent of Kate Manne's "Down Girl" and "Entitled," this book is highly recommended reading, especially for anyone who wants better to understand power differentials at play within sexual dynamics between the sexes. The only criticism I have is that the chapter titled "Coda" lost me with its chaotic format & it seemed out of place in the middle of the book.
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Thanks to Netgalley and FSG for the ebook. The author takes on the issue of sex in modern society and asks hard questions about pornography, the #MeToo movement, prostitution, sex on campus between students and also between students and teachers and a variety of other questions about sexuality that seem to have no easy answers. She shows the evolution of these questions in our recent history and where they sit with us now. And even though there are no easy answers it’s great having the author as a guide and fascinating to see some of the conclusions she arrives at.
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A wonderful collection of Srinivasan's thoughts on contemporary, intersectional feminism, this book touches on topics such as abusive professors to sex work, building up to an important concluding essay on feminism and carceral abolition. Fans of Srinivasan's work will appreciate the ways in which the longer format allows us to see the overarching sense underpinning her ideas, and readers new to Srinivasan will appreciate the beauty of her prose as much as the strength of her ideas.
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