Cover Image: You Truly Assumed

You Truly Assumed

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Member Reviews

You Truly Assumed gives an intimate view of three different teenage Muslim girls and their experiences when hate crimes against Muslims start to happen. I appreciate that each girl in the book was from a different part of the United States, of different backgrounds, and experiences but yet were all able to come together to form a collective bond in their time of need. It shows how you can bond and connect with others through a shared experience and how we are programmed to have biases toward Muslim people without knowing their experiences and feelings.
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The premise of this book is excellent. Sabriya, Zakat, and Farah are three black Muslim teens who connect online through Sabriya's blog, You Truly Assumed. They team up to grow the blog and become friends in the process. As an educator, I am all about young people finding a place to make their voices heard and working together in the face of adversity.

Unfortunately, the actual writing of the book failed to give each of the girls a distinct voice. Their chapters seemed to blend together, and the dialogue, especially when any of the young women were talking to adults, often felt unnatural. The author herself is quite young, and I'll be interested to see how her writing style evolves as she publishes more.
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I loved the found sisterhood and the representation of Black and Muslim but it was missing a tiny spark. I really wanted to get to know the three young women and their stories a lot more. Once I was getting close to a character we shifted perspectives and started over again. Overall though, it was a powerful story about standing up for yourself and your beliefs and coming into yourself.
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You Truly Assumed follows three Black Muslim teenagers as they navigate life immediately following a terrorist attack in Washington, DC.
I feel like I really don't have to describe this book anymore than that if you consider how Islamophobia has impacted views on terrorism. Once "terrorism" is mentioned, many minds assume the terrorist was Muslim, especially if the name "sounds" Muslim, which in this case, it does. YTA delves into what it's like to be a Muslim in America after a terrorist attack - and reveals a truly maddening and sometimes terrifying experience. One of my favourite parts of reading is being put in someone else's shoes and I think everyone would benefit from being put in these girls' shoes for a moment. Because it was told from three different POVs, I feel like it barely scratched the surface of the trauma involved with experiencing Islamophobia as a Muslim, however it worked to get the overall message across. The first chapter grabs your attention immediately, the family representation was awesome for a YA book, and the inclusion of blog posts throughout really broke up the story nicely. This is a heavy, but important one.
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📝 Black Islamic Teen Protagonists; Alternating 1st Person Perspective

First off, this book was not written for me. I am not Muslim nor Black, so please keep that in mind when reading my review.

While I enjoyed seeing this story through the eyes of three teens from different backgrounds, I felt that there was just too much between the three stories to give it the adequate depth that the story needed. So much of this story seemed to happen off the page, even the building of their friendship wasn’t shown to happen in real time. There were some things that I would have liked to have witness first hand (like the vigil), instead they were just glossed over almost like an afterthought. I also found there to be a fair amount of unrealistic situations or reactions to situations, within the story.

I picked this book up because I LOVED the representation of Black Muslims in this book. I enjoyed reading about these characters and their experiences. As sad as it is to say, I can unfortunately see the situations in this book, happening in real life to those in marginalized communities. I think that this story covers a lot of important topics. Although there are things with the writing style that I would have liked to be different, I would still recommend reading this book.

Although I am not the intended reader for this book, I wish that it had a glossary of some sort at the back to explain some of the Muslim terms used. There were some words used that I was ignorant to them or the full meaning behind them.

Thank you to the author & publish for this gifted book. These opinions are my own.

Trigger Warnings: Islamophobia, Online Bullying
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I loved this novel so much I finished it in 2-3 hours. A quick, powerful read about three black Muslim girls who start a blog after a terrorist attack leads to Islamophobia, it was inspiring to watch Kat, Farah and Sabriyah speak truth to power and refuse to back down in the face of bigotry and racism. I would have loved a longer book with more developed subplots, but I did enjoy the three different narratives of the different girls, and it will remain a book I will recommend to others to read.
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Really enjoyed this contemporary YA novel about three Black Muslim teen girls who start a blog about their experiences in the wake of a terrorist attack that provokes Islamophobia throughout the US. I loved how this book highlighted community and intersectionality, and I appreciated that each girl's experience and journey was different.

At times, the writing felt a bit weak, but there were enough positive attributes in this book that I was able to look beyond that. I still think this is a really strong debut, and I'm looking forward to seeing how Laila Sabreen's writing grows and develops in the future.

I've already purchased a copy for my library and will be recommending to fans of Samira Ahmed, Nic Stone, and Cam Montgomery!
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I really enjoyed the premise of this book! I won't comment too much on the rep other than that I did like the Muslim rep. The parts about leaning on Allah and your faith in your hard times was really sweet and hit very close to home. And as a Muslim on a public platform, I appreciated the conversation about Islamophobia online and the cowards who hide in comments. 

While I liked each individual story enough, I do think too much was happening, and so there wasn't enough depth to these characters. There's a lot of potential and I think if it had been one storyline, instead of three, I would have enjoyed it more!

With that said, I'm eager to see what Laila writes next!
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You Truly Assumed was filled with young women that find hope and joy, and themselves, are worth fighting for. They were inspiring not only to the people they came in contact with throughout the novel, but to me as the reader. These women also came from tight family units, that even when they disagree with one another, are supportive and understanding in the ways that matter. This plot point was a huge moment for all parities involved, and I felt like it deserved a little more "screen time". But overall, bravo.
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3.5 stars, but we love people taking back their voices so easy round up to 4 stars!

Following the lives of three young Muslim women after a public attack leaves the world blaming Muslim people and showing their islamophobic colours. You Truly Assumed becomes a blog that connects these young women as they form a friendship while running this blog and it influences and affects their lives.

The lives of each character were fascinating and entertaining; each is bringing their slice of life to the story and their problems (whether big or small) and their family dynamic - I honestly loved Zakat's life the most because her personality shone through the brightest.

Other than that, the friendship was very underdevelopment in my view, and besides the way they approached hate with the blog and some personal bigots, not a whole lot came from the blog.
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Three strong women.  Stories that gave me different insights than my own experiences and a chance to think outside myself.  Definitely worth reading and learning.  Very well written.  Thank you NetGalley for the chance to read.
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I had high hopes for this book and it was so amazing to see a hijabi on the cover but then I read the book and I did not enjoy it at all.
.
This book was heavily advertised as Muslim rep but there was barely anything except Islamophobia and…an Allah necklace.

In fact there are instances where things are shown inaccurately. One of the MCs, who has spent her whole life at an Islamic school, makes wudhu, incorrectly. I don’t understand why this was never picked up because it’s so easy to fact check.
There’s also a mention of a bell in the minaret to signal the prayer time and that was so weird because we don’t use bells. We have the adhaan to call to prayer. A bell makes me think of a church.
There are more instances that made me do a double take but these are the ones that stood out most.

The characters themselves were not well written and the writing felt like it was a first draft not an edited book.
The relationship between the three of them felt very forced and not realistic. They didn’t know each other and then suddenly they’re best friends.

Just this book was disappointing on so many levels and I barely made it through the book.
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You Truly Assumed is a YA contemporary that explores the trauma the the Muslim community in the US has gone through with the current political climate that has encouraged a culture of hate towards the Islamic faith. This story is told through three black Muslim teen girls in the aftermath of a bombing in D.C. that fueled the spread of hate to their communities by extremist groups. 

I felt so in awe of the strength of the girls in this novel and how they persevered through racism, Islamophobia, and their own personal struggles as well. Their friendship was such a beautiful thing to witness 

If you want a read to inspire, read this book!
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I had a hard time getting into this book, but I think I may not have been in the right headspace to read something so....heavy. I think the cover made me anticipate a lighter read.
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This was a heartwarming tale of 3 young girls coming together to share their stories and overcome the prejudices they face on a day to day basis. The cover is gorgeous, the premise sounded brilliant, and the representation is exactly what we need in books today, but I feel it just fell short of its mark. The narrative style was stilted and short and I found myself getting bored, I really had to force myself to pick up the book and continue. The dialogue felt awkward to me and not at all like how teenagers talk so that took me out of the story a lot. I feel maybe this book could've gone through a few more rounds of editing to really add a bit more punch to the story. I admired each of the girl's journeys but it was the writing that really made this a sub-par read.
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You Truly Assumed is a book about rising seniors as they navigate their daily lives as Black Muslim young women. The novel follows three young women named Sabriya, Zakat and Farah. It is Sabriya, who reluctantly starts a blog to create a safe space for young Muslim girls like herself, after learning that there was a terrorist attack in her hometown of which Muslims are once again, being blamed for orchestrating. With that said, Sabriya  forms  friendship with Zakat and Farah that she didn't know she needed (they didn't either) as she enlists their help in producing the blog, You Truly Assumed. . For me, this novel read extremely slow in the beginning and I almost gave up on it. However, I didn't and I developed a love for each character and began to root for them and the success of the blog. Although I do not identify as Muslim, I definitely remember how I felt growing up as a young black woman and being concerned how others perceived me because of my blackness. Overall, I enjoyed this novel and would recommend it young black Muslim teens and or young women.
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The writing is geared at young YA (probably early high school), but the topics are probably better suited to slightly older YA, so not sure exactly where this falls but certain that it only really speaks to the target age group.  It definitely deals with topics relevant to today.  We didn't get as much development and back story, which would have made the story richer and more interesting.

Thank you to NetGalley and Inkyard Press for the ARC.
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Awesome concept! The three teens in this book are so well-developed, and I loved how the author weaved their tales together to create a commentary on Islamophobia in the US. A powerful read that I also felt was appropriate for teens audiences and will open up a conversation.
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When I heard that this book is about 3 black Muslim characters, I really want to read this and was so happy that I got to read ARC of this thanks to the publisher!

But.. It was just an okay read to me. What I like about this book was how the author really highlighted the main characters voice on the exploration of racism and Islamophobia issues. I rarely read about that talks about that issues, so it's really interesting to read You Truly Assumed.

But, there are a few issues that I particularly dislike on this book. I'm not Muslim myself, but my family are. So, I know a bit. And I'm not sure that's how wudhu works in real life. Other than that the main characters felt flat. They didn't really stood out to me.

Nevertheless, as a debut novel this was okay and I really enjoy reading this. I hope the author can write more of books like this because we need more diverse book!
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Thank you Netgalley and the publishers for an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Beautiful book. This story will stay with me for a long time.
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