Cover Image: What's Coming to Me

What's Coming to Me

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Member Reviews

I gave this a three out of five stars. I thought this was an okay book but I think it could be so much better.
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This was an enjoyable read! I appreciated how it touched on grief and navigating life with a parent who is terminally ill. The mystery plotline was fun, but it did feel disjointed at times. I had trouble getting into the book at first but really enjoyed it once I switched to the audiobook, which is narrated by Frankie Corzo.

I'll be recommending this a lot at my library! I think it'll be a hit with fans of Sarah Everett or Ashley Herring Blake.
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This book was pretty good. For a debut, it was fairly well written, is plot-driven and fits well in its genre. The pace varied, at times to its own detriment (ie oscillating between too fast and too slow). I liked that it focused in on some important themes like sexism and employment equity, but I didn't love how it drifted away from that at times. Overall, a decent book and I look forward to seeing what the author comes up with in the future! Thanks to netgalley and the publisher for giving me the chance to read and review this book.
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Loved this book. Thought it would be for ya only but the story really takes you in. Loved the Minerva character. Has many aspects incuded and is a recommendation. Thanks to netgalley for providing me a copy of this book.
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This book was good, a pretty solid debut. There were times where I felt the story was moving along too slow, but then other times where it felt very rushed, so I think the pacing needed to be measured better. It's a very rough read, the MC deals with a lot of heavy issues and self-destructive behaviors. While I didn't connect with those parts of her (and honestly, found her a tad annoying at times) I can see how she can connect with others who may react the same way she does. Overall, a decent read.
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this is a solid ya contemporary book that is fairly plot driven as it opens with a 'bang' ! sadly i found the writing style a bit too green for my taste but i would definitely recommend it to younger readers as it explores topical issues with realism and empathy.
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If I could say one word about this book, it would be powerful. I loved the narrator’s  voice and what the book was trying to say. It spoke on themes of racism, sexism, classism, and privilege. What true justice looks like. I think this is a powerful book for teenagers to read.
4 out of 5 :stars. 

Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for this ARC in exchange for my honest opinion.
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Solid intent here, with the interplay between power and privilege, the difference between justice and right. It's very reflective and the justifications the characters give don't always make sense. Plus the pacing is a bit slow the tension lacking.
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A great exploration of grief and anger. I'm a bit biased when it comes to contemporary YAs because I love them  but What's Coming to Me was definitely such a realistic contemporary YA and I have no doubt that its existence will be cherished by many (especially BIPOCs) who can relate to its story.
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I was lucky enough to hear this author speak at the ALA conference and to get a physical ARC as well as a digital one for this amazing book. There are definitely some deep topics here (grief, armed robbery, harassment) but the voices of the characters make all of that feel so real it is hard not to get pulled into their world for better or worse. Minerva hates her job but she needs it to help support herself and her mom who suffers from chronic illness and is back in the hospital. When the store gets robbed and she learns of possible money to be found she wonders if this might answer all her problems. It reminded me a bit (a stretch I know) of On My Block when they were looking for the RollerWorld money. A great read with a great voice that I am excited to bring into my classroom.
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Rating: 4.5 rounded up

Padilla’s author note really set the tone for reading this book. Learning about anticipatory grief through Minerva’s character put a completely different lens on grief. A lot of the destructive behaviors like underage drinking, drug use, fighting, etc., that she engaged in weren’t a part of my own grief process when I lost my own mother a couple years ago. However, it is understandable considering Minerva is much younger and has been dealing with the fact that her mom was dying for years. 

The romance with Min’s coworker Eli from Duke’s Ice Creamery was ok but I could have done without it. I much more enjoyed the scenes with CeCe and Mary. Those relationships felt more authentic while reading. 

Any BIPOC teens and adults who grew up poor and always struggling financially will relate to Minerva and her motivations for going after the treasure and wanting to get out of Nautilus. A quote that really resonated with me is, “They say money isn’t everything, but that’s for people who have never worried about how they’re going to sleep, or drive to work, or buy a f***ing piece of fruit.” Usually people don’t understand this unless it is part of their lives experience. Padilla’s depictions of poverty and deprivation were well done. 

What’s Coming to Me is essentially about grief in all its various forms, growing up in poverty and being BIPOC  as well as being angry about the way in which systems and structures in society are put in place to keep you down. I enjoyed this one because Padilla’s witty writing style made a book with tough topics not feel so heavy to read. 

Thank you NetGalley and Soho Press for an eARC of What’s Coming To Me in exchange for an honest review.
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This was a heavy read but the main character voice was authentic and engaging. I can see many of my teens enjoying this books. .
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Thank you to NetGalley for the ARC digital edition.

Unfortunately, I was unable to read this in the time allotted. It remains on my “to be read” list for the future.
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Min is having a shitty summer. She's got a job that doesn't pay enough, where her boss is a creep. She's having trouble at school, her mom's been in the hospital, and the dude she's crushing on may or may not hate her. Oh, and then the ice cream shop she works at gets robbed. WTF.

The cover of this novel caught my eye first, and the book jacket made me request it. While I do read a lot of YA books, I don't typically read thrillers, because I have a hard enough time sleeping at night. But this wasn't a bump in the night haunted house kind of book. It's a novel about a teen, trying to find herself, but getting caught in the pull of her hometown, a place she can't escape. And how doing something wrong might be the way to get out. But also, dealing with a secret that she won't talk about. Because if she says anything, it'll be real. And she's avoiding that for as long as possible. 4 out of 5 stars.

I was provided an ARC copy of this book through Netgalley. My thanks to the publisher and the author for providing it to me.
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A fast read about love, and loss, and rage, and loneliness — this book took me by surprise, and I had trouble putting it down. It felt a bit rushed, but I did enjoy the breakneck speed - I just wish we’d been able to add a bit more character development and context. All in all, this was a promising debut, and I look forward to more from the author!
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Francesca Padilla’s YA debut, What’s Coming to Me, examines grief, poverty and retaliation through a poignant and sometimes messy lens. Minerva Gutiérrez is barely keeping afloat. Her mother’s health condition has deteriorated beyond hope, she is skipping school, and working a tedious job in order to build up her “Probable Orphan Fund.” To outsiders, Minerva appears to be an apathetic teen with no motivation who is just going through the motions. But Minerva is not okay. She is not dealing with her anticipatory grief, but is actively avoiding it. She doesn’t want to talk about her mother because then everything will be real and in order to get up every day, even to a life that is starting to feel more and more hopeless, she has to close herself off from this reality. It is a defense mechanism that often has her retreating into herself and often lashing out at others. She is angry and desperate to get out of her small town. This desperation leads her into dangerous territory when she and a friend decide to rob her shady boss. What’s Coming to Me starts off slow and made me wonder where it was going, but once its plot found its footing, it sunk its claws into me and never let go. Padilla’s debut is about the lengths people will go to to survive, what justice can look like when conventional avenues aren't available to you, and how protecting yourself from grief can sometimes leave you drowning anyways.
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Just go and read the blurb cause it sounds wild and it was but it was a lot deeper than I was expecting?! I didn’t expect this to be emotional in anyway, I just thought it would be Minerva getting revenge on her disgusting boss, which was fun to tag along with, but there was so much more that made this a brilliant read.

Min was such an interesting character. I did get frustrated with her at times and questioned a couple of her decisions but I was really rooting for her throughout. There’s a sort of twist halfway ish and I’m so annoyed that I didn’t realise it sooner. As soon as this thing happens it seems so obvious and I immediately felt like an idiot for not clocking it earlier! But it adds so much context to everything that’s gone before it and after and kind of broke me a little

Now usually I’m a bit of a villain lover. Even really horrible people I still want to see a bit of redemption for them. But Anthony. Fucking hated that guy. Not sorry at all. No. Yuck. I’m not okay. Even just taking one thing - the cameras?!?!? Why is this guy allowed to run a business where young innocent people work??

Eli I loved and felt anger towards but I still loved him and that’s that.

Mary and CeCe. Both of their characters were intensely different and while they both made mistakes, I was still rooting for them too!!

Fun, sad, chaotic, brilliant, dickhead destroying - what more could you want??
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This book has some characters I fell in love with, and some amazing themes weaved into a 'will they succeed with this crazy weird unwise unlikely plan????'-plot. There were times I wanted to give the protagonist and her friends a good shake - just like I imagine Nicole wanted to do quite often. I think the mom's cousin was my favourite character of all, no matter how annoying Min thought she was. I must admit that a chunk of the plot felt slow at times, but those great characters and wanting to know what would come to them in the end kept me going. Let's say I was not disappointed.
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Minerva’s voice is very authentic, as is the portrayal of poverty. I really appreciate those elements and the depth it gives the story. This is a very strong debut. I’m not sure that I will use it in my creative writing classes, but it is one I’ll recommend to students, especially to those who either haven’t seen their Dominican identify portrayed much on the page or don’t fully understand their privileges, whether it be race, stable family, or finances.
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This is a really interesting one for me, because, I didn't necessarily love this reading experience but I also really enjoyed this book? I think I went it with much different expectations than what this book ended up being..

Still giving this one four stars, because I think it's super unique and it feels special. It's like a hard-hitting contemporary meets a thriller, and I love that it's set in Long Island and discusses poverty. I feel like most LI stories are all glitz and glamor. The writing feels very literary, but not in an off-putting way. 

The characters are nuanced and show a lot of growth. There's twists but nothing feels outrageous. Overall, I think this could be a really big hit with several types of readers. Padilla manages to avoid many overused tropes, and our characters feel very much like real people. I'm excited to see what she does next.
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