Cover Image: Bright

Bright

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Member Reviews

There are characters and elements of the book that I did think were good, but it is hard to fathom that  a student with learning challenges makes it to 8th grade before intervention are explored.  Something just didn't ring true to me.  Marianne's sensitivity to her peers' feelings and her kindness were the best part of the story.
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Beautifully written novel. I’m always rooting for the underdog and I love watching characters grow into something more special than they already knew.
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I enjoyed this one a lot. I first chose the book since my coworker (also a librarian) is named Marianne, but I was really engaged in Young's writing and Marianne's story. I think kids will be able to relate to her!
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I liked seeing the development of Marianne and how she really starts believing in herself. I liked how she helped everyone else see their strengths too. 
This is a great look at friendships. A good middle grade read. 

Thanks NetGalley for this ARC!
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Bright is a suspenseful, thought-provoking story of a girl struggling to pass school, whose only recourse is to join Quiz Quest. Examines different types of intelligence, what’s necessary to make it all happen, stereotypes, how we think of ourselves.
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I loved this book. It was empowering. So important to send the message to believe in yourself and to ask for help when needed. Don’t let your negative  preconceived notions be your reality
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Bright is well worth sharing with young readers. It’s well-written, thoughtfully explores issues that are relevant, and would be a welcome classroom library addition.
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It's hard to explain how much I love this book. The pacing is excellent, the characters and enjoyable, and the insight Marianne demonstrates into her how coping strategies was really intriguing. The only aspect that felt unbelievable was the ridiculously mature way Marianne and her sister dealt with their occasional fights. May we all be so lucky as to have children that mature, introspective, and responsible.
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Marianne can’t be bothered to try in school because she doesn’t do well. When she’s told she’ll repeat the 8th grade if she doesn’t bring up her grades, she reluctantly joins the Quiz Bowl team. The team is not happy at first but slowly help her study. Mr. G , her math teacher and Quiz Bowl leader, tells her she needs to show “proof of effort” and if she does he will give her extra credit to pass math. After they win the first round, Marianne still feels she’s not good enough. When Mr. G frustrates her one day, “you have to struggle in order to learn something,” she walks out of math. Now what? Can she still compete? Does she even want to? Have her grades changed enough so she can pass to the high school?
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Bright hits perfectly at Middle School level and addresses a subset of kids that is often overlooked. Marianne Blume is getting ready to fail 8th grade.  She is drifting away from her best friend, Skyla, and her perfect overachieving sister Lilian is acting strangely.  Marianne's last hope is the school's Quiz Quest team, where she learns more about herself, friendship, and handling changes than she learns about trivia.
This is a terrific read for kids who have lost confidence in themselves or are feeling lost in the transition from middle to high school.  The characters are varied and diverse and manage to fly under the line of stereotypes.
Reads quickly.
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