Cover Image: How to Money

How to Money

Pub Date:   |   Archive Date:

Member Reviews

"This book is jammed packed with such useful information.  Even as an adult, I listened to this book with a notepad and pen.  I have pages full of notes!  I learned so much and I am already enacting some of what I learned.  I love the idea of getting this information into the hands of teens.  It walks them through how to get a job and then how to handle the money they make.  I wish I had this book when I was in high school.  I wouldn't have made nearly as many money mistakes as I have in my life.  

The illustrative aspect of the book is fantastic.  The breakout sections, charts, and imagery add so much to the book.  It makes a topic that is important but a bit dry (especially for teens) much more readable.
Was this review helpful?
I love a great book about money.  After working in financial services for 10 years, I can see the need for this knowledge.  It isn't taught well in schools or college unless you are financial major specific.  It is awesome to read a book with such useful knowledge about the way money works.  Definitely recommending this to friends and adults just starting out.  Thanks NetGalley for the ARC.
Was this review helpful?
I really enjoyed the practical, straightforward manner of how money, jobs, budgeting and investing all matter to teens.  There were lots of snapshots of professionals who have worked their way up the corporate ladder and some of their best advice which is great for teens to hear.

I think this should be a must-read for any teen who is taking on new responsibilities (new job, 1st car, going off to college.)  I highly recommend it for school libraries and public libraries.
Was this review helpful?
This is a fantastic resource for teens and young adults alike who wish to learn more about managing money! Super helpful and a fun read.
Was this review helpful?
This book was so well done. Perfect for any teen / tween to learn about money. Recommend for anyone and everyone who wants to learn how to manage their money
Was this review helpful?
How To Money is a must-have guide for every parent who wants to teach their children about money and for teens who want to learn about money on their own.  
This book teaches:
creating a budget and sticking to it
Scoring that first job and what the paychecks mean
Navigating student loans and avoiding student debt
Getting that first credit card and what credit is
Investing like a pro and why it’s important

All so you can earn more, save smart, invest wisely, borrow only when you have to, and enjoy everything you’ve got!

Wonderful advice from an interview with Ilhan Omar, a US Congressional Representative for Minnesota: “refuse to give oxygen to people who don’t have your best interests at heart”.  
This piece of advice doesn't have anything to do with the subject of money but of self-care, which I struggle with.  I've always found it difficult to put myself first, so it's great that teens reading this book will hear the advice early on in their lives.

A must have money information guide that covers everything from how to correctly fill out a check and deposit slip to saving for retirement and the important reminder to take care of yourself and your health. I will be purchasing this book for the high school library, 5 stars!
Was this review helpful?
Review Written for a class June 2022:

Making Cents of Handling Your Money

What is the biggest money mistake a person can make? Is it spending more than what is earned? How about letting the total balance drop dangerously close to zero? Maybe it is being too trusting in other people with money. This is one of the many questions How to Money: Your Ultimate Visual Guide to the Basics of Finance asks its readers. Questions like these gets readers thinking about what they have done with their money and what they could do to prevent further mistakes.

How to Money: Your Ultimate Visual Guide to the Basics of Finance by Jean Chatzky, Kathryn Tuggle, the HerMoney Team, with illustrations by Nina Cosford, is a self-help how-to guide on the basics of finance. The book is divided into five sections about money: Earn It, Manage It, Use It, Get Schooled, and Look to the Future. Each chapter is in the typical order someone would be handling their money from a younger age to adulthood. Jean Chatzky is an award-winning magazine columnist, podcast host, CEO and founder of HerMoney, and best-selling author of over a dozen books on finances. Kathryn Tuggle is HerMoney’s Gracie-Award winning chief content officer and producer of the podcast with Chatzky. Chatzky founded HerMoney in 2018, which is a media company focused on improving the relationships women have with money with goals of keeping women informed on financial security, help them make the right decisions, and leveling the playing field.

How to Money is a "visual guide," including pictures, graphs, and fun facts, like what you would see in a school textbook or kids' workbook. For example, the book breaks down the differences between a credit union, online banks, and regular banks with charts listing pros and cons. Many people are visual learners and having a visual guide like this could be helpful. They will have a clear image of what a resume or check should look like. They can easily flip through the chapters using the table of contents (also color-coded edges) or find a word in the glossary. Each chapter ends with a key takeaways or to-do list, handy if remembering all the information is difficult or looking for the next thing to do. The format and illustrations of the book is entertaining and pleasing to the eye. How to Money’s colorful, illustrated cover may grab someone’s attention before a different book with little on the cover other than the title and author’s name. Interviews with successful women such as Dottie Herman, Jazz Jennings, and Crystal Echo Hawk follow every other chapter. These interviews give an insight of the various paths people have gone on with their finances and relate to the reader’s experiences with handling money.

An issue How to Money may have is with people outside of their targeted audience. If you are not the targeted audience of younger women (teens to early twenties), then this book may not be the best for you. Having a specific audience may not be the worst thing but, it can turn deter other people. Everything within the book is related to women: interviews with successful women, written by women, recommendations to support other women. There are lines that are written to identify with the reader like “some things for obvi,” “we always went for the butterscotch,” “honey, we’re looking at you” For women, this could be comforting but for others this could be alienating or annoying. Another issue is with the formatting of the book. The pages are riddled with graphics, charts, and sidebars. Some of these have the same font as the regular text which could be hard to distinguish between the sections if the formatting or colors were to disappear due to printing or formatting error. For example, my Kindle copy is nearly impossible to read due to the graphics being broken and all texts intermingled with each other. Also, if a reader is color blind, they may have difficulty reading the colorful texts and graphics.

As someone gradually making their way into "adulthood" and learning to become more independent, understanding and handling finances has become important. Many people are not well-versed with the finance world and often only know the basics. Sure, some can write a check and make a deposit on their own but what is an APR? What is a rider and is it always necessary to have? When is a good time to dip into stocks and cryptocurrency after high school? The economics and personal finance courses I have taken were difficult to understand while How to Money has been informative and easy to follow. I found the interviews with other women to be interesting and comforting because they were reminders that even the most successful people have made mistakes with their money and have gotten past them.

Even though How to Money is geared towards a younger female audience, it is still a good book for someone to start with understanding and handling finances better or to use as a refresher. How to Money is an accessible and helpful tool to allow people to make informed money decisions. It is an aesthetically pleasing and engaging way to learn about finances. It is also an uplifting tool for women to make the leap into finances, advocate for themselves, and make smart money-making decisions.

Thank you to the authors, Jean Chatzky and Kathryn Tuggle, the Fiercereads team, and the publisher for gifting me both an e-arc and print copy of How to Money to review.
Was this review helpful?
Thank you so much Macmillan for sending me an early copy of How To Money by Jean Chatzky! In How to Money, financial expert Jean Chatzky, Kathryn Tuggle, and their team at Her Money Media break down the basics of money- how to earn it, manage it, and use it! In this book, they will teach you things like how to create a budget and stick to it, getting your first job and what a paycheck is, how to navigate student loans and avoid student debt, get your first credit card, and what “credit” is, and why it’s important to as well as how to invest, as well as so much more! You may think money is just an adult problem, but learning how to manage it at an early age is so important and this book makes all the information you need so accessible! How To Money is out May 10 everywhere books are sold!
Was this review helpful?
How to Money is a resource I would have absolutely devoured when I was a teen or young adult, and I wish This book had been around then.

Geared specifically for young adults (and young women in particular), How to Money breaks down personal finance into 5 parts:
1. Earn it, including resume/cover-letter writing, allowance, and entrepreneurship
2. Manage it: about goal setting, budgeting, banking, and the ins and outs of things like credit and interest
3. Use it: about impulse control, advertising, and saving for big purchases
4. Get Schooled: about post-secondary options and careers
5. Look to the Future: about physical and mental health management and long-term planning

This book lays out (with colorful graphics and youth friendly language that sometimes tries a liiiittle too hard) all of the intimidating things about personal finance for youth about to make and manage money for the first time, and covers things I know are on teens minds (because they bring them up in therapy) like opening bank accounts, credit, saving for a car, direct deposit, etc.

When I worked in a wrap-around program with high school students, we gifted our graduating seniors a book about various life how-tos, and I’d definitely consider this as an alternative or supplement. This would be great to celebrate graduations or first jobs, or to help younger teens get a head start on planning.

A couple of caveats: How to Money is definitely US-specific, geared towards girls, specifically references “mom and dad,” and leans pretty heavily on personal responsibility/hustle rhetoric, so if you’re planning to gift this to a teen living with someone other than birth parents, or a teen with a disability, you may want to take a look at the content here first to see if it’s a good fit.

Thanks to @fiercereads for a copy of this book to review.
Was this review helpful?
After this pandemic, How to Money by Jean Chatzky and Kathryn Tuggle was just what I needed. It taught me about saving and budgeting in an entertaining manner. I thoroughly enjoyed the book.
Was this review helpful?
This is a very thorough book that covers a great deal of information. I wasn't expecting it to include tips for earning money, but it has some good basics that I think a lot of beginning job seekers are unaware of. It's also very thorough going over how to best save money, as well as tips for spending it (or not). This isn't a deep dive, but instead a book that spends its pages wisely, taking more time on the complicated things to make sure they're broken down into a reasonable manner while avoiding overload, and less time on things that don't. This is a very women focused book with highlights on successful women sprinkled throughout, but as they say in the beginning it's got advice for everyone. Forget the gender spectrum, even as an adult I found it interesting. I'm more likely to use this as a reference than anything in the adult section. Yeah, it's geared towards teens, but the way everything explained felt spot on without being too overwhelming. I'm looking forward to having this available for my teens!
Was this review helpful?
A well thought out book on finances. Easy to read with some great tips. Would recommend this to young adults interested in learning more about finances.
Was this review helpful?
I did bot request this book but I was approved for it, hence I might as well give it try. First impression,it has the textbook feel. Not unless the text book is right at my alley of interest- which is healthcare on my part, I rarely pick up a text book just for the heck of it. This has the simplified language for wasy flow and understanding but it is no different than all the other financial self help books. I completely  fall out of the interest wagon and I have stopped reading quite a few times. It came to the time  that I can’t pick it up again.
This might get someone’s interest  specially for those that are financial conscious and are always seeking for ways to increase investment and stuff. No my kind of read.
Was this review helpful?
I didn't finish the book because I realized less than a 100 pages that this isn't for me or the best for my community.  Particularly, there is an example of a woman with a new job who is supposed to start at 9 and shows up at 8:45 to go ahead and start her day and be already done with last night's emails when the work day starts at 9. And nowhere in that example does it say she gets to leave 15 minutes later. Checking last night's email is part of the workday and is paid not, not unpaid as it was in this example. A lot of advice is clearly designed for those in middle and upper class incomes and it's pervasive enough that I couldn't ignore it. Also, assuming that children live with a mom or dad is when this book is geared toward teens, many of whom won't live with either parents, especially considering how much American is still feeling the opiod epidemic. 

There is some good material in here and the illustrations are engaging, but it's missing the mark.

I'd prefer not to rate this at all, but Netgalley won't let me.
Was this review helpful?
What a helpful and fun book about money for teens. We always need more titles like these to help teens understand budgeting, work, investing, etc. The illustrations will likely engage teens to help the topic feel more interesting and accessible.
Was this review helpful?
USEFUL book with tons of information.  Young readers will learn a lot about budgeting and paying bills. So glad this book is published.
Was this review helpful?
Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions expressed in this review are my own. 

How to Money is a great little book to educate and encourage smart habits when dealing with money. It is mainly geared towards young adults however I think this would be a good reference book for anyone who would like to learn the basics of finances. This book covers so many different aspects of finances from how to write checks to conversations with potential bosses at job interviews. 

There is so much useful information in this book. I think this easy to follow how to guide should be in the hands of teens and young adults alike. If you are entering the work force or feel like you could use some more help with basic finances then this is the book you need.
Was this review helpful?
This is a great book for teenagers, not for older people. Gives good advice about saving money, how to find a job, etc. 
I wasn't able to see the illustrations properly on the e-book format.
Was this review helpful?
This book was absolutely fantastic. I've already added it to our list for order this year and will recommend it to students.
Was this review helpful?
I have been a listener of the Her Money podcast for some time, and I appreciate that the creators have written this how-to-financial guide for those who need the information at its most fundamental level.  While the text is geared to adolescent girls and young women, the financial information is useful to all.  Included are definitions to financial terms adults may not know but may be afraid or ashamed to ask.  The text discusses the gender pay gap, negotiating salaries, saving for security deposits, compound interest, IRAs, first cars, health care, and so much more. 

My criticisms do not mean that one should disregard the book, but I would encourage the publisher to update it as finances change frequently.  As an example, the monthly budget only allocated $14 to gas, and we certainly know that the economy has been far more volatile of late. It would be a shame if the book was published and immediately the figures used had it feeling dated. On some pages, there are sidebar topics set off by a sort of border, but as the typeface is the same, it is hard to distinguish it as a sidebar from most text.  Additionally, the authors cite the origin of the gender wage gap to the aftermath of World War II, yet as an educator, I know it existed before then with the growth of teacher prep programs and the proliferation of female teachers due to the ability to pay less in the 1800s.  At times, the language intended to be light and witty comes off as a bit Bo Burnham’s “White Women’s Instagram”ish: “we all have wants like that funky beaded curtain you’ve been eyeing on Etsy” (57).  While the book does discuss true emergency expenses, they weren’t in the pie charts as part of the 15/50/30 breakdown, which felt a bit inconsistent.

Throughout the text are short profiles of notable people and they discuss their biggest money mistakes.  Those profiles and mistakes will make the text relatable to a wide range of people.  Included in the text are suggested resources and a great glossary.

I could easily see this text implemented in financial literacy classes.  This touches on a topic many student have expressed wishing to know more about.  While the text is slanted to a female audience, males would benefit from the information as well, as many are now raised in households headed by women who may not have received this kind of financial education themselves.

Thank you to NetGalley and Macmillan Children's Publishing Group for this ARC in exchange for my unbiased review.
Was this review helpful?