Cover Image: Atlas of Vanishing Places

Atlas of Vanishing Places

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Member Reviews

What a neat and unique book! Wonderful content and illustrations documenting many places that used to be. I loved considering how places change over time. 

Thank you NetGalley and the publisher for providing this ARC. All thoughts are my own.
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What a delight. The anecdotes. The history. The maps. I was completely absorbed. It was fun to read, and sobering. The only thing I can say by way of criticism is that I wish it had been longer.
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The information in this book was well written and researched, if somewhat inconsistent in tone. Elborough switches from the academic to the casual, sometimes mid-sentence, which didn't always lend the prose a great deal of flow. But the research was clear, and I was generally impressed by the amount of relevant information fit into such a small word count for each place.  It was definitely a good read, and one I'd be happy to recommend.
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I've spotted this as a hardback and thought the idea was fascinating! I've always loved the concept of Atlantis as a kid and this satisfied a craving for a more grown up conversation on similar places. 

I like that it's a little shorter in page count with plenty of well-written chapters so it makes for a perfect brain snack, OR if you don't really have time then dip in or out on your commute. Highly recommend!
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Wow a stunning book!  Following the international bestselling success of Atlas of Improbable Places and Atlas of the Unexpected, Travis Elborough takes you on a voyage to all corners of the world in search of the lost, disappearing and vanished. Discover ancient seats of power and long-forgotten civilizations through the Mayan city of Palenque; delve into the mystery of a disappeared Japanese islet; and uncover the incredible hidden sites like the submerged Old Adaminaby, once abandoned but slowly remerging.
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A very cool non-fiction book showcasing all the civilizations that used to exist and where they were! It's always nice to learn about these cultures and what happened to them!

Thank you to netgalley and the publishers for providing me with an arc for an honest review!
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Amazing photos accompany the sad tales of places vanishing from the earth. Perfect for history and travel lovers.
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For those who love history, geography, archaeology, travel and nature, this book is a fascinating - if sad - look at the world as it once was. To consider the Great Barrier Reef and Great Wall of China in their glory in the past, it is heart-breaking to think of them crumbling and decaying.

Of course, lost cities and vanished places do have an air of mystery and an almost magical sense of discovery, so it's not all doom and gloom. Far from it, as the glorious maps, photographs and illustrations make this an exciting book. Included in many of the entries are bits of folklore and tasters of ancient civilisations, such as the Mayans (one of my childhood fascinations) some that have totally disappeared and some simply buried under water or by forests.

Interesting too, is how rivers have changed course or lost an arm and forests have been wiped out through various reasons. Glaciers shrinking at an alarming rate changing the landscape before our very eyes. All these vanishing places.

This is a book to dip into as each entry is discrete. It is engaging in style and easy to understand and accessible to all. Happy to have it in my collection.
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This was a fascinating look at ancient cultures and places, most of which have either long-since vanished completely or are rapidly in the process of doing so. Seeing the devastation wrought by humanity upon our natural world is heartbreaking.

*This ARC was provided to me by NetGalley & White Lion Publishing & came out in September 2019.
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My comments have to stay the same as they were with the hardback:-

A wonderful book. For those who did Ur early in secondary school, and who can rattle off factoids about Hammurabi at will, comes this volume, which introduces us to what could be called the most important places that don't exist, and, gleefully, many are places you won't have heard of. The Hittites, yes, but their capital city, resplendent within miles of walls surrounding an imposing – if heavily restored – citadel? Alright, it only took until the third place here, Leptis Magna, before I hit one I'd actually heard of, but the fact remains – for someone such as I, who would claim some geographical nous on a TV quiz show, will have copious holes in their knowledge filled by these pages. Sticking with Leptis Magna – I might have been alright remembering its name, but could tell you nothing about it – but this volume can tell you what is known about it, map it, photograph it – and never have the feel of pure armchair research, which is superlative. Splitting it up into spurious categories of kinds of place, so cities and towns are replaced by a chapter of cities, towns, rivers and a whole island that's vanished, is daft, but that's the nearest thing to a flaw. The reasons for the places having vanished differ, but you do see an environmental thread before too long; it's good then that the focus is both on manmade environments as well as naturally occurring ones. This was right up my street – a road in several cases to nowhere I even knew existed.
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Very interesting, makes me want to find out more about the places and visit some. Also makes you think about what is happening and why. I now want to read the other books by this author.
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This book is outstanding. Organized chronologically by type of place, and full of interesting facts, figures, and photos, I feel like I visited each place and learned something new and important about each one.
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A fascinating book that I have no doubt I will revisit. So many places I had never heard of and peoples long forgotten, brought to life by Elborough's writing.
Of course this isn't a comprehensive study of any one single place or population, but it has absolutely started an interest in me to discover more about these Vanishing (and vanished) Places.
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Thanks to NetGalley, the publisher, and the author for this ARC. This was an interesting book, I do wish that the digital version I received had some of the content (like the maps and images) that the final version of this book has. Without it, it does take away a lot of the immersive aspects of the book. However, I really did find this interesting and it was a great armchair travel read.
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Lost cities, disappeared cultures, and places common people never learn about. This book is for the curious minds, the ones that go beyond what’s taught and look for things that existed but are almost never known. 
From kings to peasants to archaeologists this book is filled with wonder and it’s so thoughtful written and so well explained that you feel like you are in there. Reading this book I learnt more about the Roman civilization, the period where Mongol ruled China and many more that I am awed about how much history I was losing. My most favorite? Petra, the city that stands for an almost forgotten culture and The Death Sea, that beautiful place that proves, once again, how destructive humanity can be. 
This is a book for culture seekers!
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Armchair travel such as this, allows me to explore and learn about places I have never and in this case could never visit, all from the comforts of home. The photos and maps included in this edition were helpful and informative paired with the tales and histories, and held my attention throughout. 

Atlas of Vanishing Places is a re-release of a previously published edition, now published in August of 2022. Thank you to Quarto Publishing Group - White Lion, Aurum, NetGalley and the author for the arc.
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Yet another book where the ARC lets a reader down. Formatting issues and no maps led me to wonder why do a digital version of the ARC and not include all the aspects of the physical? Content wise it was a bit uneven. Some entries were long, others too short. It read at times like an unevenly edited encyclopedia.
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Atlas of Vanishing Places: The Lost Worlds as They Were and as They are Today is a fascinating look at places that have disappeared and faded into memory, and those that are disappearing right before our eyes. 

The book is divided into four sections. “Ancient cities” where we read about Xanadu, Alexandria, and Petra. All once bustling and thriving centers of civilization that have all but disappeared from maps. “Forgotten Lands” reminds us of places with mysterious pasts like Roanoke, Virginia. “Shrinking Places” recount areas that no longer command the great areas of geography they once did, such as the Dead Sea and the Everglades. And finally, “Threatened Worlds” which are disappearing or being destroyed due to climate change, like the city of Venice due to rising waters, and Glacier National Park due to melting snow caps.

What’s fascinating is the maps and photos included with each entry. We can see the changes in the landscapes and get an idea of how these places looked in their prime. I highly recommend this for students of history, geography, or travel. My only issue was that the photos and maps were in black and white. Perhaps that was because I was given an ARC and not the final copy. If everything is in color, where appropriate, this book would be a great coffee table book or conversation starter. 

Thank you to NetGalley, the publishers, and the author for an ARC in exchange for a fair and honest review.
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I love books like this, where something that is lost brought back to life in a small way, and 'Atlas Of Vanishing Places' certainly is the perfect book if you also love that kind of thing too. 

Filled with incredible photos and profiles of different places around the world, there are places in this book I thought were practically mythical they seem so unreal yet these entries give you a great insight into these missing places and the photos really allow you to see what you've missed and where these places are in the world today. 

Really bringing to life these places for you, the photography is so good in this book, particularly the photos of Xanadu and Helike really are incredible and I would also recommend the profiles in the section about Shrinking Places, particularly the chapter on The Everglades, which is just depressing that somewhere like that could disappear entirely one day. (Not to mention that chapter on Venice.) 

A really interesting and fascinating book that really explores some incredible places, I'd highly recommend this book for anyone with a love of travel and the curious. 

(I received an ARC from Netgalley for honest review).
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Travis Elborough’s Atlas of Vanishing Places is fine for what it is: an atlas. Perhaps I should have expected that it would read as encyclopedia entries, but I definitely thought there would be more of an overarching narrative to the book. I would have loved a more creative look into vanishing cities, since that is what I expected, but that’s on me. The different entries seem to not be the most cohesive; some cities receive a mere couple paragraphs, whereas others get several pages. None seem to be portrayed in a particularly interesting light. Every time it seems like the city’s entry is getting somewhere good, Elborough ends it and moves on. I’m not sure if the book would be printed in color, but it would be for the better; the black-and-white maps and included photos do not seem to add anything dynamic. It’s fine. 3 stars.
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