Cover Image: The Girl with the Yellow Star

The Girl with the Yellow Star

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Member Reviews

The Girl with the Yellow Star by Natalie Meg Evans and Narrated by: Amalia Vitalie
Length: 12 hrs and 52 mins was a beautifully written book and the narrator was perfect. 
This latest book The Girl with a Yellow Star, is a historical fiction book, set in Cornwall England in 1943. 
Gwenna Devoran one of the main characters and is one wonderful kind woman. Her her husband was killed whilst fighting in the Navy. Gwenna wants to help others and is giving shelter to Jewish refugees in her farmhouse. A young girl called Lotti who is ten years old is waiting at the train station. Sadly lotti's mother was killed trying to get her to safety. Lotti is so scared and traumatised she does not speak.But, Lotti is a little Jewish girl who steals Gwenna’s heart. Gwenna does everything to protect this little girl.

This book was heartbreaking, gripping and a beautiful story about how love shines brightly even in the darkest times, and the incredible sacrifices people make in wartime.

I highly recommend this book especially if you love reading about WWII books. 

Big Thank you to Netgalley and Bookouture Audio for a free copy of this audio book for an honest review.
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This was an emotional read but it was good read. It was one that was worth the read. It did take me a bit to read it, not because it was bad book. But because it was a hard read.
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This was a great first outing with this author! I hadn't read any before, but I love historical fiction so couldn't resist!
WW2 books are, in my opinion, in a heavily saturated genre, but The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah is one of my all time faves so I can't resist them!
This one is a good read. Emotional, raw and heartbreaking at times with characters you will to survive another day. Which is pretty much what you hope for with this genre, and what you can expect from this book!
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Young Lotti and her mother are forced to flee their home, pursued by the Nazis. Finding a home in Cornwall, the unthinkable happens and Lotti is alone among strangers. In Cornwall, German prisoners of war are sent to work the British farms, and Lotto's protector Gwenna finds herself drawn to one of the prisoners, regardless that he is her enemy. Well written and poignant.
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This was my first NetGalley read and I was so excited to read it! It took a bit longer than I expected to because of life, but I very much enjoyed it. I give this book 3 stars because I enjoyed it and felt that a fellow historical fiction WW2 lover reader would enjoy it as well. The story was sweet and a WW2 historical fiction book never gets old for me,
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One of the best WW2 historical fiction books that I’ve read.
10-year-old Lottie has seen some horrible things…
Her papa was taken away by the Nazis…
Her mama had an accident at the train station…
There are still Nazi soldiers all around, although this was supposed to be a safe place. Maybe, if she doesn’t say a word, like her Papa told her, and never German, like her mama warned, she can stay alive. Lottie can tell anything in secret to her bear Rumtopf, and he’ll keep it inside himself…along with something else she must forever hide…
*Thanks to Netgalley for a digital copy in return for an honest review. All opinions are strictly my own.*
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Great story overall, a good detailed novel with a different wartime feel as the basis incorporates German POW ‘s working on the land in wartime England. 
I found this a really sweet love story, but it was also heartbreaking with the conflicting feelings of the main characters Max and Gwenna. 
Last 10 percent felt rushed, we jump from end 43 to February 45 in a page, but enjoyed the novel as a whole and would read more from the author.
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Childless and widowed by the war, Gwenna is thrilled to take in a German Jewish woman and her young daughter Lotti. She never expected the mother to die before she could even meet her - and German POWs to show up at her farm to work soon after she brings the orphaned girl home. Still less did she expect to ever come to feel anything other than hatred for the men she blames for the death of her husband - however conflicted their relationship. Can Gwenna keep Lotti safe and meet her needs amidst the uncertainties and horrors of war? And can Gwenna come to terms with the past and overcome her prejudices to make a future?

An interesting war-time read that held my attention even when I felt the characters were behaving irrationally (but in a very human way)! The setting isn't one I'm particularly familiar with, so that was interesting in itself, and I was intrigued to get a glimpse of POW life in Britain - complete with the attitudes of those around. While this book is what I would call clean (only the very occasional word I prefer to avoid and closed door scenes), I wasn't thrilled to find a homosexual couple in the background and sex outside marriage happening between Gwenna and Max. However, I'm aware that most people won't care about these things and mention it only for the few who will. All in all, other than those reservations, I enjoyed the book - especially seeing Gwenna gradually overcome her prejudices, and watching Lotti blossom. A good read.

Note that I received a complimentary copy of the book from NetGalley. I was not required to write a positive review and this is my considered opinion of the book.
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Earc: NetGalley 
Publisher: Bookouture 
Publication Date: 27th October 2022 
Genre :General Fiction, Women's Fiction, Historical Fiction 

 really  loved this book. A historical novel set in England in 1943.

Gwenna is a lovely lady who took in a Jewish refugee girl named Lottie after her mother was killed. Lottie was such a sweet, gentle, sensitive and wonderful girl and I really loved her. I also loved Gwena and Max, the German POW who works on Gwena's farm. The three are getting along well together.

It was heartbreaking and emotional at times, but I thought it was a really sweet story. It's a great book that I highly recommend.

#NetGalley #bookstagram #bookreview #goodreads #womensfiction #generalfiction #historicalfiction
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Still reeling from the loss of her husband, Gwenna Devoran continues working hard. She is struggling to keep her farm afloat, but she also agrees to house two Jewish refugees. When she arrives at the train station she discovers that there’s only ten-year-old Lottie, who tragically witnessed her mother’s death. Quite naturally, Gwenna takes Lottie home with her. Sadly, Lottie will not speak, but Gwenna hopes that with time she can bring the little girl out of her shell. 

Meanwhile, things are difficult on the farm and Gwenna needs more assistance than she has. She is not pleased but she is forced to accept German prisoners-of-war to work on her farm with her. This increases her fear for Lottie, because she is hoping that these German soldiers did not discover that Lottie is Jewish. 

Still, Gwenna has not been able to get Lottie to speak, but one day on the farm she does hear Lottie speak, quite happily in fact, and it is to a German soldier named Max Reiner. This really scares Gwenna. But there is something that she sees in Max that lessens that fear. This brings about confusing feelings for Gwenna, because Max should be the enemy. But, Lottie is getting better and better each day and part of it has to do with Max. Gwenna soon learns that Max is different than many of the German soldiers. In fact, he is a man who did not agree with the Nazi cause and has done what he could to distance himself from that part of the war. However, his actions in the world, might have a very personal connection to the loss that Gwenna has had in her life. 

Of course Gwenna is torn. Focused on Lottie’s healing and future, the last thing Gwenna wants to deal with is any romantic notions she has towards Max. Meanwhile, Max has his own feelings and this might just place all of them in danger. This is a powerful story of courage, strength and love. Quite naturally it is about also about healing, as well as the strong bonds that grow between Gwenna, Lottie and Max. 

What a fabulous read by Natalie Meg Evans. This book was so touching, so inspiring, so uplifting, that it was utterly impossible to put down. Gwenna, Lottie and Max were remarkable characters and a their story was truly compelling. I loved the different take on this World War II historical fiction book because of the viewpoint of German prisoners-of-war. You can’t go wrong when you read a book by this wonderful author, and I definitely would recommend this book. 

Many thanks to Bookouture and to NetGalley for this ARC for review. This is my honest opinion.

Please enjoy my YouTube video review - https://youtu.be/qaMdXchXzaM
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Thank you NetGalley & Bookouture!

Overall I really enjoyed this book.

I will say the beginning tends to get a bit long winded and then the ending is done and gone in a blink. I did absolutely love the ending though, I just wish we were given a bit more.

Triggers:
Mention of suicide
Physical Altercation
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The Girl With the Yellow Star by Natalie Meg Evans is one of the most enthralling books I have read in a long time.
The Girl With The Yellow Star grabs your attention and doesn't let go all the way through the book and you are still thinking about it when you're done.
I would have to say Lotti is my favorite character. I fell for this young Jewish girl and her gentle vulnerability. She gets thrust into a whole new environment with people she doesn't even know after a terrible tragedy. Luckily, she has her beloved teddy bear, Rumtopf which I looked up to see is a German word for preserved fruit in rum. Well, Rumtopf is a very useful bear and saves a life.
I could go on about this little girl saying after the tragedy she doesn't speak for quite some time despite being taken in and having excellent care. She goes to school and excels at all of her subjects.
Gwenna, who takes her in has her own sadness and problems to deal with but gives of herself by taking care of this sweet child. When she hears Lotti chatting with German captain Max Reiner, showing him her teddy bear she is so surprised to hear her speaking but scared for the little girl. Will they take her away?
As she gets to know Max more, she finds herself starting to trust him. I enjoyed seeing the trust develop between Gwenna and Max and also a relationship.
While Lotti heals a bit more each day Gwenna hears a terrible rumor in the village, that Max actually fired the torpedo that killed her husband. Max is desperate to have Gwenna trust him and prove his innocence, will he be able to?
"An absolutely heartbreaking, gripping and beautiful story about how love shines brightly even in the darkest times, and the incredible sacrifices people make in wartime."
One of the best books I've read this year. I need to see what other books the author has out right now!

Pub Date 28 Oct 2022
I was given a complimentary copy of this book.
All opinions expressed are my own.
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Cornwall, England 1943: Gwenna Devoran is working through her grief after her husband was killed.  He was fighting in the Navy.  She fills the hole in her heart by housing two Jewish refugees in her farmhouse.  When a train arrives filled with Jewish passengers, Gwenna is immediately drawn to Lotti.  She is ten years old and her mother died protecting Lotti.  Lotti needs Gwenna’s help in order to survive what lies ahead.  

Wow, this was such an amazing and captivating book.  I was heartbroken by the storyline and found myself reaching for the Kleenex box so many times.  This gripping story had me from the very first word on page one until the very last.  I was inspired by Lotti and what she endured in such uncertain times.  I was also inspired by Gwenna, and so many like her, that risked everything they had to save so many innocent children.  What a heart-stopping and emotional story that broke my heart over, and over again.  I devoured this book in one sitting because I was breathless, waiting to see what happened next.  I was fascinated and amazed at the flip of every page.  This absolutely intense story is a must read.  I loved it. 

Thank you Natalie Meg Evans for such a wonderfully written story.  I enjoyed it very much, it was truly inspiring, and I highly recommend it.
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This book was an absolute joy to read!  A wonderful story that will have you completely engrossed from the very start. An emotional read that is perfect for fans of historical romance.  I was completely taken by the story and the characters. Highly recommend.
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Despair steals the tiles from a man’s roof, but hope mends the holes in his ceiling.

I cannot even try to wrap my mind around that despair felt by those who were forced to wear the yellow star. What an incredible story about a young girl and how she thrives in spite of that hated yellow star. A new country, a new home, a new language and more and yet young Lotti manages to excel! It certainly brings the thought as to how well we would accept all these changes. 

This early ebook was received through Bookouture and NetGalley. These impressions are my own and were in no way solicited.
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Natalie Meg Evans is in flying form with this brilliant new book, The Girl With The Yellow Star. Given the title I had somewhat of an idea what the story would be about and I never even bothered to read the blurb as I usually really enjoy this author’s books and knew I would be in for an absorbing and engaging read. I thought it perhaps might be set in a concentration camp somewhere in Europe so I was pleasantly surprised to discover this book was set on a farm in Cornwall. Looking at the cover it is so apt and sums up this book to perfection. 

Lotti, a young Jewish German girl, is fleeing from Paris where she had found a safe haven with her mother Miryam for three years. But Hitler and his insane policies and reign of terror is catching up with them and once again, having previously escaped from Berlin, the pair find themselves bundled into the back of a van and trying to find safety. All Lotti has are a few belongings and her teddy Rumptof. Said teddy may seem insignificant at first but Rumptof plays a crucial role throughout the book. He becomes like a security blanket or talisman for Lotti as she navigates her way through a new and strange world where fear and the threat of danger is ever present although one woman’s love, commitment, strength and solidarity do their best to ease the suffering and horrors that Lotti has experienced.

Gwenna has managed the family farm in Cornwall since the death of her father. She is aided by three of his long term helpers, Ezra, and Roddy and Hilda who are married. I loved Gwenna as a lead character right from the moment we are introduced to her as she waits on a station platform to receive Miryam and Lotti. The pair having made it to London to stay with Freda, a friend of Gwenna’s, now need further security following a disturbing experience for Miryam which has greatly affected her. The opening quarter or so of the book was dramatic and contained a lot of events and information which set the reader up nicely for what was to come for the remainder of the book. 

Colvennon Farm was to provide peace and quiet for mother and daughter but tragedy strikes and Miryam passes away. There is a lot more to this than first meets the eye and this is deftly explored throughout the story. As there are many strands to the story there was a danger that they could have become entangled within one another and therefore become difficult to distinguish. But this never occurred and the entire storyline was aptly developed from start to finish which made you really care for the characters and everything they were experiencing and fighting for.

Gwenna is a woman doing things that pushed her ahead of her time and although she faced stiff opposition for her methods on the farm or the fact she was even doing farm work, she rallied against this and even more so when more angst rises to the surface which really tests her viewpoint. She is a hard worker and one is never afraid to get stuck into the dirty work of the farm alongside the men because she wants the farm to be successful. Gwenna is still trying to come to terms with the death of her husband which occurred when his naval boat was struck by a torpedo off the coast of Ireland. Yet the reader can sense that perhaps all was not as it seemed with the marriage and this is explored in more detail the further the book develops. 

Gwenna is one of the best female characters that I have read in a long time. She pushes herself outside of her comfort zone time and time again and always battles with what is the right or wrong thing to do. Should she follow her head or her heart? This issue rises to the fore several times and it was interesting to see how this was played out. Her strength, courage, resilience and resourcefulness meant you came to admire her and everything she stands for. She doesn’t hesitate for one minute to still take Lotti when she is left motherless and as we get to know her more you question whether she is trying to be the mother she has so longed to be or would she have done this anyway?

Lotti, although young, is a remarkable character who has been through trauma and heartache. Her mother is gone and the whereabouts of her father are unknown. What she has witnessed has left her mute but the reason for this does become clear and it brings a tear to your eye. I felt Gwenna was the perfect person to bring her out of her shell and to nurture and protect her. They both needed each other in more ways than one and Gwenna is fierce in the love that she develops for the little girl who has lost so much. Gwenna may be headstrong when it comes to farm issues and I loved how she stood up to the despicable pair that was Roddy and Hilda but at the same time she shows great compassion, patience and caring for those that she knows need love, care and attention. 

Through focusing on Lotti and rehabilitating her so to speak she is coming to terms with where life has personally taken her. But conflicting emotions and village opinions threaten to derail her mission to provide Lotti with a good life and I loved how it all fed back to the story surrounding her marriage to Edward. But at the same time the arrival of some much needed helpers to the farm throws the cat amongst the pigeons. What happens when the enemy arrives at your doorstep and you have no choice but to accept them and even more so when feelings develop into something more which go against everything you believed you stood for? Will so much loneliness mean Gwenna steps into the lions den? Can she cope with the fall out?

The Girl with the Yellow Star really gets you thinking deeply about many issues. You constantly ask yourself what would you do if you were in Gwenna’s situation? Natalie Meg Evans has given Gwenna a real strong voice with plenty of conundrums to deal with and also several difficult choices to make. When prisoners of war from the nearby camp are sent to work the land with her in order to fulfil the Ministry of Agriculture’s requirements, she is faced with no choice but to accept they have to be there. That doesn’t mean she has to like it especially as it throws up some uncomfortable memories that prevent her moving forward. As the blurb says her heart is torn between loyalty to her country, the memory of her husband and the little girl who has found a firm place in her heart. How she deals with all this was fascinating to read and would certainly inspire much discussion and debate. This is a story of sacrifices, loyalty and doing your best and trying to follow your heart when the world seems dead set against you. It’s a stunning read from the first word until the last and is perfect for anyone who likes historical fiction set during the war that provides you with something just that little bit different which has you rapidly turning the pages.
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Cornwall England in 1943….Gweena is asked to take in a young motherless Jewish girl.  Can Gweena become a mom to Lotti?  
There is a lot going on within the story.  So much heartbreak but also, courage, forgiveness and love.
The information about the German POW’s was interesting and informative.
If you are a fan of WWII historical fiction you should think about reading The Girl with the Yellow Star.
Thanks to NetGalley, the publisher and author for the opportunity to read this book for my honest review.  All opinions expressed are my own.
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The Girl with the Yellow Star is set on a farm in Cornwall during WWII; Gwenna takes in a young German refugee, Lotti and her secret holding teddy. Lotti is mainly silent and when she does speak it is in German.  Gwenna needs help on her farm and requested land girls but she was sent 3 prisoners of war from the recently built POW camp instead.  Locals are scathing about this.  

I found it interesting to learn about German POWs never having read about them before. I would have like to have been Gwenna's friend and support as I felt she didn't have anyone apart from her old farmhand.  If you like WWII stories, you'll enjoy The Girl with the Yellow Star.
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The book had a slow and confusing start. I almost dnfed at 15% but kept reading. I thought the plot was really simple and boring at times. I was underwhelmed by this book and felt this was more of a task to finish reading. Gwen lost her husband and took is responsible for running the farm with her fathers three long time employees. Gwenna takes Lotti in after finding her on the train platforms, builds her trust, and protects Lotti from the cruelty of the town and the towns people. I found the story of Max to be a nice touch to the story along with Lotti and Gwenna. This book is good for people who enjoy reading historical fiction. I enjoy reading about subjects on the holocaust and world war 2 but this book was not for me! Not among one of the top historical fiction books I have read. I still found the story to be enjoyable and continued reading to the end! 

Thank you Bookouture and NetGalley for the eARC in exchange for an honest review!
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The Girl with the Yellow Star

Meg Evans is among my favorite authors. So, naturally, I was delighted to be approved by NetGalley and publisher Bookouture to receive a free copy in exchange for an honest review.
Ms.Evans’ characters are so realistic they jump from the page, as though they are old friends the reader has not seen for a long time.  Her attention to detail in creating the Cornwall settings makes you feel you are actually there. Yet she does this with an astonishing economy of words. The reader is not obliged to wade through lengthy travelogue descriptions. Just enough of the local dialect is included in the dialogue passages to draw the reader in. The author knows how much to use without it sounding like a foreign language.
I admire how Ms. Evans’s German character: Max is not the stereotypical hardened Nazi nor the hapless man forced to serve in the army (Kriegsmarine in this case). Neither is he the almost clichéd character who rejects his identity and his country to join the resistance. Max remains true to himself to the end. 
The story advances at a fast pace but without feeling rushed. The reader does not lose track of the seasons, as the farm work is meticulously, almost lovingly, detailed. 
However, I remain ambivalent over Lotti’s character. At the start of the novel, she is a nine-year-old acting like a six-year-old. Having taught scores youngsters of that age , I know that is not how they behave. It does not fit. Even allowing for differences in a society some seven or eight decades in the past, it is highly unlikely that an intelligent nine-year-old would behave the way Lotti does, sometimes to the point ridiculousness, like standing on the railway tracks when she knows a train is coming, just because she’s been told not to move. By chapter fifteen I was still wondering whether she would ever begin to act like the bright ten-year-old we are led to believe she is. Half way through the novel, this finally happens. She acts like a regular ten-year-old. When the author, through introspection, shows the girl’s thoughts, they are again portrayed as totally immature for her age. Why when otherwise the characters are spot on?
I also found the ending was rushed. In contrast to the careful pacing of the rest of the novel, here the plot suddenly jumps ahead, without transition, to a year after the war and everything is quickly sewn up. I felt cheated.
However, let not that deter you from picking up The Girl with the Yellow Star. It is a fascinating read and a page turner.
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