Cover Image: Never Whistle at Night

Never Whistle at Night

Pub Date:   |   Archive Date:

Member Reviews

DNF @55% - You know, I never planned to DNF this. DNF an anthology always seemed pointless to me. However, this has been on my currently reading shelf for two months now, with it being untouched for over a month. I just have to be realistic with myself and just admit I’m probably never going to pick this back up. It’s not a bad anthology by all means, but the stories just didn’t work for me. It has felt like a slog to get through, and I can’t believe I still have a little less than halfway to go. There were some stories in here I really liked, and if I kept reading there might have been more but now we’ll never know.

Was this review helpful?

An unsettling mix of short horror stories. Never Whistle at Night is a great read for horror fans and provides a unique mix of stories written by Native American Authors.

Was this review helpful?

Never Whistle at Night is an amazing anthology, pulling together authors with a variety of styles. No two horror fans are going to like the same kind of scare and this anthology does a wonderful job of providing different kinds of scares for those readers. It also provides readers with an introduction to each author, whose other works they can dive into once they are finished with this book. I would recommend this book to all horror fans and those that think they are ready to give horror a try.

Was this review helpful?

Never Whistle at Night :An Indigenous Dark Fiction Anthology edited by Shane Hawk and Theodore C. Van Alst Jr. features twenty-six stories written by indigenous authors. Surrealism and the supernatural, indigenous folklore, traditions, beliefs, racism, legacy and generational trauma are only a few of the themes that are explored in this collection of “dark” fiction. I wouldn’t describe the vibe of these stories as nightmare-inducing but more than a few will leave you feeling unsettled and pondering over what you just read. Do take your time with these stories as they are heavy reads despite the short length.

My ratings for the individual stories are as follows:

 Kushtuka by Mathilda Zeller : 5⭐
 White Hills by Rebecca Roanhorse: 4.5⭐
 Navajos Don’t Wear Elk Teeth by Conley Lyons: 3⭐
 Wingless by Marcie R. Rendon: 3.5⭐
 Quantum by Nick Medina: 4.5⭐
 Hunger by Phoenix Boudreau: 4⭐
 Tick Talk by Cherie Dimaline: 4⭐
 The Ones Who Killed Us by Brandon Hobson: 4.5⭐
 Snakes Are Born in the Dark by D.H. Trujillo: 4⭐
 Before I Go by Norris Black: 3.5⭐
 Night in the Chrysalis by Tiffany Morris: 3.5⭐
 Behind Colin’s Eyes by Shane Hawk: 3.5⭐
 Heart Shaped Clock by Kelli Jo Ford: 3.5⭐
 Scariest. Story. Ever. by Richard Van Camp: 4⭐
 Human Eaters by Royce K. Young Wolf:3.5⭐
 The Longest Street in the World by Theodore C. Van Alst Jr.: 3.5 ⭐
 Dead Owls by Mona Susan Power: 5⭐
 The Prepper by Morgan Talty: 3.5⭐
 Uncle Robert Rides the Lightning by Kate Hart: 3⭐
 Sundays by David Heska Wenbli Weiden: 4⭐
 Eulogy for a Brother Resurrected by Carson Faust: 3.5⭐
 Night Moves by Andrea L. Rogers: 3⭐
 Capgras by Tommy Orange: 3 ⭐
 The Scientist’s Horror Story by Darcie Little Badger: 3⭐
 Collections by Amber Blaeser-Wardzala: 4.5⭐
 Limbs by Waubgeshig Rice: 4⭐


As with most anthologies, some of the stories were more impactful than others but overall, with strong writing, vivid imagery, and superb storytelling this is an impressive collection of stories that I would not hesitate to recommend to fans of indigenous fiction that tends towards darker themes. I also enjoyed the Foreword written by Stephen Graham Jones which gives us insight into the theme behind the collection.

Many of the authors whose works featured in this collection were new to me and I’m glad for the opportunity to have been introduced to their work. I look forward to reading more from these talented writers in the future.

Finally, I love the cover art!

Many thanks to Penguin Random House and NetGalley for the digital review copy. All opinions expressed in this review are my own.

Was this review helpful?

Never Whistle at Night is an anthology of short stories written by indigenous authors. The majority of the stories are horror, though some might be better described as magical realism or thrillers. All sorts of monsters stalk the pages of these stories - white men and wendigos, racist mother-in-laws and professors that collect trophies of "diverse" students. Like with all anthologies, I enjoyed some of these stories more than others. All in all, this was a fabulous, spooky collection - perfect for long winter nights. I love the realness of stories where the horror is oppression and this collection had a lot of that, sometimes with a mystical twist.

Highly recommended!

Thanks so much to Shane Hawk & Penguin Random House for this ARC through NetGalley! Never Whistle at Night is available now.

Was this review helpful?

I really enjoyed NEVER WHISTLE AT NIGHT. I had a fantastic time reading a few stories a day from this collection, each very different from the one prior. I recognized a number of the authors, but there are quite a few new names to me that are adding to my 'authors to watch' list! The stories mix real life horror with the paranormal and fantastical, blending dark and creepy with a lot of great twists! Some stories called to me a bit more than others, but I enjoyed all of them in this collection.

Was this review helpful?

Loved all the stories, so well written and such a spooky atmospheric vibe. I loved learning about indigenous culture and lore. Great anthology!

Was this review helpful?

Never Whistle at Night has become one of my most favorite anthologies EVER. There’s so much packed into this, so many different topics and just about every sub-genre of horror you could ever want. I enjoyed the changes in tone between stories, it never felt monotonous to me. I highly recommend it and will be revisiting this one in the future. Thanks to Vintage Anchor Books for my eARC. Never Whistle at Night is available now.

Was this review helpful?

An excellent anthology of dark fiction. I was expecting more science fiction and fantasy than horror, but was pleasantly surprised when most of the stories had some sort of horror element attached to them. Many of the stories verged on realism with supernatural storytelling aspects intertwined ever so slightly. Oftentimes, the characters use scary stories to cope with the horrors of everyday life (abuse, poverty, mental illness, racism). Other times, the supernatural is front and center. Stephen Graham Jones wrote a brilliant forward that left the reader in the right mindset to begin this anthology.

Some of my favorite stories are:
Navajos Don’t Wear Elk Teeth by Conley Lyons
Snakes are Born in the Dark D.H. Trujillo
Scariest. Story. Ever.- Richard Van Camp
The Prepper by Morgan Talty
Sundays- David Heska Wanbli Weiden

Was this review helpful?

This collection was such a treat! Each story was so distinct and reflected each author’s voice, yet contributed to a unified whole.
This book is perfect for to reading aloud around a fire on a chilly, dark night.

Was this review helpful?

This collection of short stories had me absolutely engrossed. Each story is a wonderfully bite sized morsel of terror to be consumed rapidly and with abandon. I’d recommend this to anyone that loves a story with a dark fantasy twist and atmospheric vibes. I can’t wait to give this to my mother for Christmas!

Was this review helpful?

Out of (I believe) 26 stories, I gave 13 of them a 4 star rating or above (5 stars x 6, 4.5 stars x 2, 4 stars x 5), and only 4 stories received anything below a 3 star rating. That's a pretty solid collection in my opinion. It's always difficult to rate collections, especially when they are written by many different authors with different writing styles. Obviously there will always be some stories you like more than others, but all in all this was really enjoyable, and it finally got me to read (and FINISH) a book again.

Was this review helpful?

Never Whistle at Night by Shane Hawk is a captivating and thought-provoking collection of short stories that delves into the darkness that resides within the human psyche. Each story in this protagonist, Jack Pansay, is a complex and deeply flawed character whose descent into darkness is both tragic and compelling. Hawk's exploration of Pansay's ill-fated flirtation with Mrs Keith-Wessington is captivating, as he deftly captures the collection is a masterclass in storytelling, with Hawk's writing skillfully luring the reader into a mesmerizing realm where reality and the supernatural intertwine seamlessly.Hawk's atmospheric descriptions are vivid and evocative, creating an immersive reading experience that allows the reader to feel as if they are a part of the haunting worlds he has created. The protagonist, Jack Pansay, is a complex and deeply flawed character whose descent into darkness is both tragic and compelling. Hawk's exploration of Pansay's ill-fated flirtation with Mrs Keith-Wessington is captivating, as he deftly captures the emotional turmoil and ambiguity that accompanies forbidden love.

Was this review helpful?

A collection that shines, with some amazing brief horror stories with tropes explored with nuance and new angles.

Was this review helpful?

I read this on my Kindle and also listened via audiobook. I was very torn on what to rate this and decided upon 3.5 because the hard stories were very hard to listen to.

These stories range from eerie to dark, from imaginative to realistic, from gory to concerning. They were all so interesting, with some I really enjoyed and some I almost skipped. Some focus more on lore and seem further from reality while some are painfully realistic.

Overall, I think I liked the book but some of these stories were very hard to read and listen to.

I enjoyed the short story format because it kept it interesting and made it easy for me to pick it up and read a quick story and feel like I had a good spot to leave off on for next time.

Some of these stories are pretty disturbing so I would make sure to check content warnings because there are some big ones here!

Thank you to NetGalley for my digital copy and PRH for my audio copy!

Was this review helpful?

What a wild ride! I'm not usually into anthologies, but this one was a winner. From disturbing to gothic, this collection has everything a dark fiction fan could want!

Was this review helpful?

Never Whistle at Night offers a variety of spine-chilling, harrowing, and gruesome stories. I enjoyed the variety of writing styles and sub-genres of horror that were included. This book is perfect to pick up during the Halloween season. The indigenous perspective and experiences of generational trauma and colonialism were horrifying to read about just on their own...considering they come from real life history. The infusion of indigenous culture, legends, and religion make the stories of Never Whistle At Night a notable anthology.

Was this review helpful?

This anthology was such a beautiful representation of indigenous dark fantasy. Some of these stories horrified me, some made me cry, but all of them impacted me. Also the forward by Stephen Graham Jones really set the tone for all of book. I adored this and would highly recommend.

Was this review helpful?

What an amazing compilation of stories! Equal parts terrifying, meaningful, and well written. I spaced these out to keep from creeping myself out too much and it was so wonderful to have a couple unique stories to read every day. I loved working through these over the fall but they are also perfect for long winter nights. The collections start strong and continue that way with so many regional and traditional stories told through a modern lens. I particularly enjoyed the story by Dani Trujillo. Highly recommended. I will be going back to this collection over the years and gifting it to my horror loving friends.

Was this review helpful?

Great collection of short fiction spanning a broad variety of content. Some stories felt scarier, while others were more unnerving, while others were just plain upsetting. There's a delicate balance here between stories solidly rooted in reality, those that feel more fantastical, and those that hover in that hazy place between the two. I really enjoyed how many different nations from across North America are represented in these stories, giving readers exposure to a wide variety of source material. Anthologies can be tricky to rate because readers are bound to enjoy some stories more than others, but this collection is definitely one I wouldn't hesitate to recommend.

Special thanks to NetGalley and Penguin Random House for an ARC in exchange for review.

Was this review helpful?