Member Reviews

Milo and Alex are called out to a double homocide, a women who is married to a Bel Air Richey Rich and her Italian lover. Which one was the target? As usual (if you read this series) there aren’t a lot of surprises here. Milo and Alex eating in restaurants, Blanche the French Bulldog begging for table scraps and Robin working on a vintage guitar. Solid predictable read.

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4 stars-You always know what you are getting when you read a Jonathan Kellerman novel. A police procedural with a little bit of humor added in. I enjoy the relationship and the banter that the main characters Alex and Milo have with each other, and of course I love Blanche, the dog. This one had some interesting jewelry tidbits, but otherwise was a fairly straightforward whodunnit, no big surprises, more of a realistic story and ending.

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Milo and Alex together again to solve the murder of a couple in Bel Air.
The woman is married, the man is not. They are at his home. Nothing has been stolen or disturbed. just two dead people shot through the heart.
Milo and Alex share their thoughts and meals...bouncing ideas off one another in an almost casual way. They find the solution after a long bit of detective work and it is a rather surprising ending.

enjoyed this very much.
Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for allowing me this ARC.

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Ghost Orchid is the 39th book in the Alex Delaware mystery series. Psychologist Delaware partners with his longtime friend Milo, a lieutenant with the LAPD. Opening this book feels like a visit with old friends as I have read all the books in this series, starting with When the Bough Breaks in 1985! The plot revolves around a double murder in Bel Air. One of the victims is using an assumed name and the pair spend the entirety of the book trying to figure out the true identity and then the killer. This one just fell flat for me. The ending felt rushed and a bit boring. As much as I have loved this series, perhaps it's time for the retirement of these two main characters. Readers who like police procedurals might enjoy this one.

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I look forward to new Alex Delaware book every February and they never disappoint. As always I was kept guessing until the end and now it will be a long wait until next February. Highly recommend!

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In an upscale Bel Air property, two lovers are found dead in a swimming pool. The man is the playboy heir to a shoe business empire, and the woman is his wealthy married neighbor. neighbor. An illicit affair is the perfect motive. But the house is untouched. There is no forced entry or no forensic evidence. It’s decided that the husband didn’t kill his wife or lover. LAPD homicide lieutenant Milo Sturgis asks psychologist Alex Delaware to help the case. It quickly becomes clear that both victims had troubled pasts. What troubled pasts could cause their murder?
Now Alex and Milo must confront a darkest side as they investigate a trail of deadly secrets. What are those secrets?

A fascinating mysterious novel to enjoy. The author has written a psychological narrative. He tells a story of abuse and its consequences. This is a fast moving novel.

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In the latest Sturgis and Delware book, a pool boy enters a Bel Air property and discovers two bodies floating in the pool: Gio Aggiunta, the heir to an Italian shoe empire, and a gorgeous married neighbor named Meagin March. As Milo and Alex investigate both victims, they discover two troubled pasts. As they dig deeper, Meagin March’s identity begins to be more convoluted. Who was really the target here? This case leads Alex and Milo on an exploration of the dark side of the city as they learn that some secrets are best left buried in the past. As always, Kellerman never disappoints.

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A twisty mystery mixed with police procedural in this #39 of the Alex Delaware series, but can be read as a stand alone.
Detective Milo calls psychologist Dr. Alex Delaware to the scene of a double homicide in an upscale neighborhood. They’ve been friends for years and quickly begin to work the case with very few leads to start with.
This book was a bit of a slow burn for me, but never got too slow. It was a great ending and I’ll definitely pick up more Alex Delaware books.

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This is the 39th (!) book in the Alex Delaware series. Alex and his best friend Milo, an LAPD detective, are back to solve a double murder. They have to dig deep into each victim’s past to figure out why they were killed and who murdered them. The book is suspenseful and hard to put down.

Thanks to the publisher and NetGalley, I received a complimentary copy of this book. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.

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I really enjoyed the storyline of The Ghost Orchid. The murder wasn't too graphic, yet the victims felt real. They had decent back stories, and it was interesting to see where they came from. As usual it's fun to see the dynamics between Milo, Dr. Delaware and Robin. A good engaging storyline.

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A couple is found brutally murdered by the boyfriend's pool. Milo Sturgis is assigned to the case, and he of course ropes in his favorite consultant and friend, Alex Delaware. Alex is eager to get back on the streets after recovering from injuries sustained in the last case Milo worked with him on, and this one has plenty of twists and tangles to unravel as Milo and Alex discover that the motive behind these murders reaches further than they could have imagined.

This is one of the best Alex Delaware novels that I've read in a while. Not to say the others weren't good, but this one was just a step above. I really enjoyed it. The path of this novel was such that Kellerman had to really delicately work in all of the details needed for the case to be solved, and he did an absolutely amazing job doing so. I also loved the nod to Greek Mythology and how it factored into the case, as well. You really become quite invested in who actually Meagin March may actually be, and why someone would have wanted to murder both her and Gio. Was it her husband? He doesn't seem too broken up over her death. Was it one of Gio's many former paramours, jealous that he has moved on? Maybe, but maybe not. This was a steller installment of the Alex Delaware novels, and I really am looking forward to reading the next one!

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Another great Milo and Alex Delaware book, the beginning started a little slow for me but not much farther I was hooked again. I liked that the mystery of who killed Meagin took most of the book to figure out and find out her past. I would have liked the bad guy to survive a little bit longer but meh. As always I loved the friendly chemistry between the main characters.

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Los Angeles Police Lieutenant Milo Sturgis and psychologist Dr. Alex Delaware team up again when Milo is called to the scene of a double murder. Gio Aggiunta, the playboy son of an Italian shoe empire owner and his married lover Meagin March were found dead near the pool. There’s no forced entry, no forensic evidence, and no sign of a robbery.

As Milo and Alex investigate the victims, they find both had troubled pasts. He is the son of a mega rich European shoe magnate; she is the wife of another rich man, a young, socially awkward member of the ruling elite, who isn’t pleased to learn what his wife has been doing when he’s away on business.

But then we learn that she was using an assumed name, and so the whole thing is even more mysterious. Who is this dead woman, and who killed her?

The main storyline is a lot of fun. The way it’s resolved is believable, and it’s done without any of the prurient or kinky sex that Kellerman inexplicably included for a handful of books in this series a few years back.

You can read it as a stand-alone novel if you choose, but you’ll want to read the others afterward. Kellerman’s career, and this series, were originally launched around crimes where kids were involved, often as witnesses, and those initial books are fascinating. This is book 39, but I ‘d encourage you to also go back and read his earlier ones. His experience in child psychology stands out in those early novels, while the chemistry between Alex and Milo, and the police procedural detective stories are stronger in the later books. Try them both.
Thank you to NetGalley for the free copy.

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Lt. Milo Sturgis and Alex Delaware work well as a team. They’re back together again, and this investigation will try both their patience and their intellect.

Even as they arrive at the scene of a double homicide, the questions are already piling up. The victims, the young heir to an Italian shoe empire, and his older, married companion. The first question is motive. The simplest answer would be a jealous husband? But digging into her life, they find she may not be who she appeared to be. Her history is sparse, going back only a few years. Who was she, where did she come from? Digging in the past comes with its own hazards because sometimes the past doesn't stay there.

A compelling mystery. Like a jigsaw puzzle, each overturned stone reveals a bit more of a bigger picture; yet, each clue creates more questions and another direction to investigate. Just when I thought I had figure out what direction the story was going, it took a sharp turn. This is a quick moving, truly compelling mystery that had me guessing until the very end with a resolution I never saw coming.

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In the 19th installment in the Alex Delaware series, Milo and Alex investigate a double murder. I am a fan of the series and especially enjoy the friendship and banter between the LA Lieutenant and Psychologist. The way they complemnt each others skills is beautifully written. Both a police procedural and suspenseful mystery, the case has many facets and back stories that kept me engaged till the end. The Ghost Orchid is another clever page turner that Jonathan Kellerman does so well. If I had the time, this is a series I would reread from book one. This book works as a standalone.

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I love the relationship between Alex and Milo, they are a good team. On this book, wasn't expecting the other brother would be the final answer but I did enjoy the book.

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I was invested just from the book's description. I wanted to know who Meagin March was. Who was Gio? Which of them was the target? Were they both the target? What if neither of them was? Why were they targeted? So many questions; I needed answers!

The cover is also very alluring. An image of a stunningly blue rectangular pool at night, overlooking the city with a sky full of stars above it, sits besides a warmly glowing glass-walled home. It’s inviting, yet at the same time, you know it’s also sinister.

At 304 pages, it’s an average length book.

The main characters, Milo and Alex, are familiar old friends to readers of Kellerman’s books. But there’s nothing stale about the characters or their relationship. As always, there is a subplot that involves Alex’s psychology practice.

If you’re a fan of Kellerman’s books, this feels like most of them do: as if you’re catching up with old friends you haven’t seen in a few weeks or months. The characters are well-formed, familiar, and reliable. You know that while the plot is going to take you on a twisty ride, Milo and Alex are steady and stable.

If this is your first experience with Kellerman’s books, you won’t feel totally left out. He provides background information and catches you up from previous books that helps new readers feel like they’re getting to know these characters while not boring long-time fans who are already familiar with the duo.

The plot itself is fresh and new, different from other books he’s written before. Some authors begin to feel a little stale and repetitive over time, as if they’ve run out of ideas and are recycling old ones with new names, faces, and some minor changes here and there. Kellerman doesn’t read that way, however. His books feel like I’m friends with a psychologist and a police detective, and whenever I meet up with them, they have a new, interesting case to share with me.

I felt like the subplot of Alex’s new client took more of a backseat than they usually do, though I’ll admit it has been a while since I read one of these books. But it seemed like there were far fewer mentions of it, and ultimately, I was a little unsatisfied regarding the subplot when the book ended. I was very intrigued by the nature of that client and the case presented, and I felt like I just didn’t get the ending and satisfaction I needed from it.

The main plot, however, did not disappoint. With one question finally answered, two more would take its place. Characters came and went, each distinct and providing their own take on what had happened to the two victims.

The victims, though dead from page one, were also well-formed. They were given quirks, flaws, histories, relationships - everything that allowed them to seem like well-rounded real people whom you felt sorry for one minute, didn’t like the next, and liked the moment after that. You not only find yourself wanting to know who did it and why but wanting justice to be served.

When the killer and their motive is finally revealed, you are both surprised and not surprised. Kellerman gives you enough information for you to begin figuring it out and to deduce who likely did it just far enough ahead of his characters deducing the same that you feel excited for having figured it out without feeling the disappointment of it being too easy.

The book is just the right length: not too short to leave you feeling like it went too quickly or there are holes, but not so long that it begins to feel repetitive or boring. Milo’s lack of information or clues is perfectly balanced with the discoveries of new information or clues. Alex’s assessments of people feel authentic and reasonable based on his interactions with and observations of them.

Should You Read It?
If you’re a fan of mysteries and thrillers, Jonathan Kellerman, or victims that you’re not sure if you should feel sympathy for them or not, then this book is likely one you’ll enjoy.

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I'm not sure why I've never read a Jonathan Kellerman book before now, but this was a great police procedural with likeable characters. I can't believe I've never heard of this series before now as this is #29. I would like to read the series from the beginning as I would like to know the backstory of Alex and Milo.

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Another Alex and Milo investigation. This time there is two people dead by the side of the pool. Why have they been murdered?
Thanks to Ballantine Books and to NetGalley for the ARC.

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Another solid entry into the Alex Delaware series. With this being book 39 in the series you pretty much know what you are going to get.

With this one Milo is still struggling with the injuries that Alex had sustained with their last case, causing him to keep Alex out of a lot of the work they normally do together. After a gentle nudge from Robin Milo brings Alex into a case that is a double homicide in a neighborhood of "gated estates" in Bel Air.

I did have some issues with this one as it seemed rushed to me and I missed seeing the psychologist side of Alex that we normally get to see as well. It was not until the absolute end that we say some of this and it seemed like it was put in as an afterthought. The ending of the case seemed very rushed as well. Like Jonathan did not know how he wanted to end this one and just threw something out there.

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