Cover Image: Stories I Told My Dead Lover

Stories I Told My Dead Lover

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Member Reviews

Thank you NetGalley and publisher for this ARC.

I enjoyed the short stories. Fun creepy all of the above. It was an easy read.

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Very unique and creepy, in a good way, book.
The author delved into the minds of the characters and the development was extraordinary.
If you love horror stories, you will love this book.
I will definitely be recommending it to all my horror customers

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this was such a great quick read! i thoroughly enjoyed it! it was a great change of pace to what i normally tend to pick up and it was really incredibly written! it’s one i definitely want to purchase for myself so i can have it to keep coming back to when i need a refresher! a big thank you to netgalley for giving me this as an arc so i could enjoy it early!

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I have not read a book like this one before where it is legit different stories. I liked the format and thought some of the stories were really good!

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I enjoyed this as a quick read! I don’t normally read short stories but this was a nice change of pace! The author had a variety of dark stories that I thought were interesting. I would recommend this to anyone who enjoys a good scary story.

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good horror story set although at points stories got kinda weak. tysm for the arc. would recommend someetimes. strong ones and weak

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In Jo Paquette's Stories I Told My Dead Lover, readers are thrust into the lives of characters who are pushed to their limits, forced to confront the harsh realities of life and fight for their autonomy. Paquette's poignant collection of short stories explores the complexities of human relationships, the consequences of blind trust, and the indomitable spirit of those who dare to break free from societal constraints. One of the standout stories, "The Child Who Grew Up Too Soon," paints a heart-wrenching portrait of a young girl forced to shoulder the burdens of adulthood. As she grapples with the loss of her innocence and the weight of responsibility, the reader is left questioning the societal structures that fail to protect the vulnerable. In "The Woman Who Trusted Her Doctor Too Much," Paquette delves into the dangers of misplaced trust. A woman's unwavering faith in her physician leads to devastating consequences, highlighting the importance of skepticism and informed consent in the medical realm. "The Abandoned Woman Who Wasn't Alone" takes a haunting turn as an isolated woman discovers that her solitude is not as complete as she thought. The narrative explores the psychological toll of isolation and the unexpected connections that can emerge in the most dire of circumstances. With "The Idyllic Holiday That Masked an Unspeakable Act of Violence," Paquette weaves a chilling tale of a seemingly idyllic vacation that is shattered by an act of unspeakable violence. The story serves as a stark reminder that even in the most picturesque settings, darkness can lurk beneath the surface. Throughout the collection, Paquette's characters are driven by desperation, fighting to break free from the constraints that hold them captive. They dare to challenge societal norms, defy Erwartungen, and forge their own paths, even in the face of adversity. In "Come Watch Them Burn," Paquette's characters take center stage, embodying resilience and determination. They refuse to be defined by their circumstances, choosing instead to ignite a metaphorical fire and challenge the status quo. Their stories serve as a testament to the human spirit's ability to persevere, even in the darkest of times. Stories I Told My Dead Lover is a powerful and thought-provoking collection that delves into the complexities of human nature and the resilience of the human spirit. Paquette's masterful storytelling and unflinching exploration of difficult topics leave a lasting impact on readers, urging them to question societal norms and fight for the power to choose their own fate.

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Billed as “eight stories of psychological horror,” like most short story collections this was a mixed bag. My favorite was “The Taste of Yellow,” a young boy doing his level best deals with a fundamentalist religious cult. The least successful, in my opinion, “Left Turn at the Lost Soul,” which reads like it was written by a first year literature student aping noir. But there’s some promise here.

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thank you netgalley for the chance to read/review this book early. this was my first book by joan paquette and i think it will be my last. this was a DNF for me. reading what the book was about i was so excited and ready for something horror and scary and good, but this was anything but. i only got 37% done with the book and that was really trying to finish it. i must just not have understood the writing but it was not horror in my opinion, they were just stories.

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