Cover Image: Cimarron Girl

Cimarron Girl

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Member Reviews

Such a great little book. I love it when short stories manage to tell you so much.and especially when they're also informative about historical events.
This was a great little book, full of wonderful illustrations. I'd definitely recommend it.

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THANKS for netgalley and respective publisher.

It was quite lovely children story shows the struggle around WWII.
I like the girl, anyone could imagine and pictured her by her expression written in story.
Meanwhile, Her motives too.

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this is for older children or children that don't mind not many funny moments happening in a book.

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I admit that before reading this, I don't know anything about the history of the great depression in the 1930's onward in America. This novel is a good read because it recounts the story of the infamous drought, dust storms and depression. Even though the story is a little bit short, the intensity of those catastrophes through the eyes of a little girl could still be felt by the readers.

Probably because young readers is the target audience of this book, the story is quite short. That's the only complaint I have on this. But overall, children will love this book because of the illustrations and the plot of the story.

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A book about what life was like during the dust bowl years. It is told through a young girl's memories of her life in that time. Her family tries to stay on their farm but eventually give up. They travel to California for a fresh start. When Abigal hears them called "Okies" she decides to tell them that she is from Cimarron.

The story is written expertly by the author. The illustrations in the book add to the story. This story is more than being just about the dust bowl but also shows the courage and hopes of the family.

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This book is a great introduction for children to the Dust Bowl and the Great Depression. It follows the fictional memories of a young girl named Abigail Brubaker and her family, and it details the many hardships they face without sounding so dreary it would scare away young readers. It is a bit reminiscent of the Little House books by Laura Ingalls Wilder as it is historical events told through the eyes of a child. The illustrations and photos that accompany it are lovely, and, overall, this was a pleasant read. I would have loved for it to be a little bit longer, but I think it's a good length for the intended age range.

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I enjoyed this book very much. It is well written and has a good pace. If I were to teach this aspect of American history to my class I would certainly use the book. The characters are likable and I like the way it has been written. It is not a particularly long book therefore I feel it could be used with primary aged children and would sustain their interest.

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My love for history immediately drew me to Cimarron Girl: The Dust Bowl Years of Abigail Brubaker. As this is a book for elementary age children, the harsh reality of The Dust Bowl could not be presented as devastating as it really was. With that said, as told through the eyes of a young girl, readers will get a good glimpse of this important part of our natural history. Presented as part diary and part narrative, young readers will find this easy to read. Even more captivating are the pictures themselves, illustrated by the author as well. Readers will get the sense that they are looking at the pictures through a sepia lens with a dust bowl quality about them. Finally, the book ends with an “At a Glance” history lesson of The Dust Bowl, complete with historical photographs from the era.

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An exciting story but not quite appropriate for my classroom.

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This was a great book...it showed how families...can come together...in times of strife...and make it through...somehow! I really enjoyed reading it...I almost couldn't put it down...most of the time...it was a wonderful story!!!

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A work similar to a memoir depicting the experience of a young girl as her family flees from the torment of the dust storms that plagued Oklahoma and surrounding states, which became known as the Dust Bowl. Cimarron Girl will help older children and young adults understand the personal challenges families faced when trying to migrate out of the area. Full Disclosure: I was allowed to read a copy of this book for free as a member of NetGalley in exchange for my unbiased review. The opinions I have expressed are my own and I was not influenced to give a positive review.

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Cimarron Girl is a beautifully illustrated and authentic account of what it was like to grow up in the Dust Bowl years. Abigail lives in a tight knit family and the sights and smells and the danger and the fear are all authentically portrayed in gentle, but vivid language and sweeping sepia-toned watercolors. I liked that the author does not try to pander to his young readers as he captures the challenges of hardships of Abigial's childhood and all she and her family and her community must face. As a matter of fact, I did not know much about this time period and I learned as much as my daughter. The timeline was invaluable since it allowed me to put historical context to Abigail's story. I would recommend this book for 2-5 graders.

Thank you to NetGalley and Vanita books for allowing me to review this book for an honest opinion.

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The subject of the book was interesting enough to keep me reading, but the story itself seemed more like an excerpt from a book rather then a full story. It felt incomplete and would've been better if there was more or it continued on with the life of Abigail. What happened to her an her family once the dust bowl ended? Did her family continue to do okay?

I also enjoyed the pictures and the timeline at the end.

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