Decolonial Daughter

Letters from a Black Woman to her European Son

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Pub Date 15 May 2018 | Archive Date 30 Jun 2018

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Description

A Trinidadian-American writer and activist explores motherhood, migration, identity, nationhood and how it relates to land, imprisonment, and genocide for Black and Indigenous peoples.

Having moved to Copenhagen, Denmark from Brooklyn over 18 years ago, Brown attempts to contextualise her and her son's existence in a post-colonial and supposedly post-racial world where the very machine of so-called progress has been premised upon the demise of her lineage. Through these letters, Brown writes the past into the present - penned from the country that has been declared "The Happiest Place in the World" - creating a vision that is a necessary alternative to the dystopian one currently being bought and sold.

A Trinidadian-American writer and activist explores motherhood, migration, identity, nationhood and how it relates to land, imprisonment, and genocide for Black and Indigenous peoples.

Having moved...


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ISBN 9781912248094
PRICE $17.95 (USD)

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Featured Reviews

The author writes a series of letters to her 18 year old son to help him (and the book's readers) to understand her life and the world we find ourselves in. These letters have an originality and vitality, at times meandering off on a tangent before getting back to the story she was telling.
The author is a Black woman born in Brooklyn, she spent her teenage years in Trinidad and Tobago and now 18 years living in Denmark. Her letters are at times very personnel and cover the modern world sins - racism, sexism, US international interference, US democracy gone wrong, the impact of colonisation on the colonised, the forgotten histories of slavery and imperialism, US imprisonment rates of Blacks and the poor, refuges, climate change and capitalism.
As the author has the advantage of living in three different countries her thoughts are worldly, compassionate and based on both practical experience and various studies, papers, books, music and folk tales. She has given her son and all readers much to reflect on.

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