The Body in the Dales

A Yorkshire Murder Mystery

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Pub Date 09 Aug 2018 | Archive Date 01 Apr 2019
Amazon Publishing UK, Thomas & Mercer

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Description

An unpopular victim. An impossible crime. A murderer on the loose.

Revised edition: Previously published as The Body in Jingling Pot, this edition of The Body in the Dales includes editorial revisions.

A body is discovered deep in a cave beneath the Yorkshire Dales. Leading the investigation into the mysterious death are experienced DCI Jim Oldroyd and his partner DS Carter, a newcomer from London.

The deceased is Dave Atkins, well known throughout the village but not well liked. While there is no shortage of suspects, the details of the crime leave Oldroyd and Carter stumped. How did Atkins’s body end up in such a remote section of the cave? When someone with vital information turns up dead, it becomes clear that whoever is behind the murders will stop at nothing to conceal their tracks.

Oldroyd and his team try to uncover the truth, but every answer unearths a new set of questions. And as secrets and lies are exposed within the close-knit community, the mystery becomes deeper, darker and more complex than the caves below.

An unpopular victim. An impossible crime. A murderer on the loose.

Revised edition: Previously published as The Body in Jingling Pot, this edition of The Body in the Dales includes editorial revisions.

...


A Note From the Publisher

John R. Ellis has lived in Yorkshire for most of his life and has spent many years exploring Yorkshire’s diverse landscapes, history, language and communities. He recently retired after a career in teaching, mostly in further education in the Leeds area. In addition to the Yorkshire Murder Mystery series he writes poetry, ghost stories and biography. He has completed a screenplay about the last years of the poet Edward Thomas and a work of faction about the extraordinary life of his Irish mother-in-law. He is currently working on his memoirs of growing up in a working-class area of Huddersfield in the 1950s and 1960s.

John R. Ellis has lived in Yorkshire for most of his life and has spent many years exploring Yorkshire’s diverse landscapes, history, language and communities. He recently retired after a career in...


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ISBN 9781503903111
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Featured Reviews

Nice easy read. Author is very descriptive of the area and in that aspect reminds me a bit of Stephen Booth's books. Interesting story and you have no idea of the motive till the end. Not sure why the author is building a romantic relationship between two characters who have just started working together though - thats a first for police procedurals that I have read

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I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley in return for a fair unbiased review. This is a quick, fun read. A tricky whodunnit set in the Yorkshire Dales. Written by a local who has clearly enjoyed his time researching the topic of potholing and in particular representing the local dialect in writing. This is not high literature, but the story gallops along nicely with the cops as good guys and local characters adding colour.

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The Body in the Dales is the first book in the series Yorkshire Murder Mysteries. As the novel begins a group of cavers deep inside a Yorkshire caving route stumble across the dead body of Dave Atkins. DCI Oldroyd, new arrival DS Andy Carter and DS Stephanie Johnson. This lovely murder mystery unfolds slowly and carefully allowing the reader to join in with the thought processes of the murder team. There are wondrous descriptions of the dales and Yorkshire at it's finest and having visited Harrogate it was lovely to read a quick mention of Betty's tea house. The Body in the Dales is the first in a trilogy of books and if this is anything to go by I will most definitely be reading the others. I would highly recommend this book to anyone who likes a very well written, believable murder mystery. As with all good books of this genre there are plenty of twists and turns that keep you on your toes and ensure that you really engage with the novel. The particular beauty of this book is the wonderful style it is written in. I was drawn in right from the start of the novel and was gently led along through the narrative in such a way that when another murder takes place the shock is palpable. Can't wait to read The Quartet Murders.

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5 stars A group of cave divers find a body about two hours into a cave. The man is wearing no climbing gear and was obviously not planning a climb. They know who the man is. DCI Jim Oldroyd and his new DS Andy Carter are called to the scene. They also work with DS Stephanie Johnson who is not at work that day. They learn the man was Dave Atkins and no one liked him much at all. They set about interviewing the locals immediately. The suspects are thick on the ground as the interviews show that most people believe Atkins was a braggart, a loudmouth and a womanizer. Caver John Baxter phones Oldroyd up and wants to meet with him. He believes he knows who the killer is and how he got Atkins into the cave. When Oldroyd shows up at his home, he finds Baxter has been murdered. The interviews continue in light of the two murders that have now occurred. Oldroyd goes to an antique bookshop and picks up a very useful volume and pertinent to the investigation. The police seem to be getting nowhere when Steph finally recalls what it is that she couldn’t remember. Oldroyd has an answer and tells Steph, Andy, Craven and the others about his plan. In an exciting conclusion, including a car chase, the story is concluded. Ellis describes the beautiful countryside around Harrogate called the Dales. He speaks of an interesting and exciting cave climb with Oldroyd, Carter and Steph. I’ve read some about caving, but Ellis’ descriptions were complete and thrilling. Allison is Oldroyd’s sister and an Anglican priest, brilliant, fearless and Oldroyd’s Mycroft who plays a small role in this book. Hopefully, we shall see more of her in the future. Oldroyd’s team gets along remarkably well and they seem to love Oldroyd’s slightly eccentric personality. It is great fun to watch them and read about their exploits. I am looking very much forward to reading the other books in this series. I want to thank NetGalley and Amazon Publishing UK/Thomas & Mercer for forwarding to me a copy of this great book to read, enjoy and review.

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I was in two minds as to whether to give this four or five stars. On the one hand, I really enjoyed it and thought it was a great start to a series. On the other hand, I don't like to give out a lot of five stars and I think that while this was good, there is still room for even better in later books. So, I'm going with a four plus. This was a good detective story, with lots of hints, a puzzling case to solve and some interesting characters for both the investigating team and the suspects. So far, the main detectives haven't fallen into the cliches that a lot of police detectives seem to fit. The author clearly loves Yorkshire and the countryside almost appears as a character in its own right. It certainly helps to drive the plot and the mystery along. I didn't solve this one, although I had ideas that weren't a million miles away I don't think that I'd really come close to narrowing it down properly. It was a good read and I already have the second in the series lined up and ready to go. I received a complimentary copy of this book through NetGalley. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.

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English village crime set in The Yorkshire Dales amongst a background of potholing and a village gigalo sounds unlikely but that’s what you are getting - enjoyable

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The Body in the Dales is the first in a new police procedural series set in North Yorkshire by J R Ellis and it is an enjoyable read. A body is found in some local caves and the police face a challenge to identify the killer as the victim is probably the most unpopular person in the area. As you would expect there are a number of twists and turns until the killer is identified and a nice final twist at the end. The main characters are well formed but with sufficient scope to be developed in the future. The only reservation I had was the timeframe which wasn't clear from the storyline however that aside this book is a good start to the series. Recommended

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I would like to thank Netgalley and Thomas & Mercer for an advance copy of The Body in the Dales, the first novel to feature DCI Oldroyd and DS Carter of the Harrogate police. When cavers stumble across a dead body in the Jingling Pot caverns DCI Oldroyd and newbie DS Carter are called out to investigate, because with no specialist equipment it is obvious that the man didn't voluntarily enter the cave. The detectives have their work cut out as the victim, Dave Atkins, was the most unpopular man in the village so neither suspects nor motives are thin on the ground. I enjoyed The Body in the Dales, which, while not being a particularly profound read, has a good mystery to it. Told in the third person, mostly from the point of view of Oldroyd and Carter, it has an old fashioned format which keeps the perpetrator well hidden until the denouement and allows the reader to have a go at working it out, unsuccessfully in my case but that's not entirely my fault as much of the pertinent information is also concealed. Still, it's fun having a go and certainly keeps the reader occupied as they run through the possibilities. It had me hooked from the start with several puzzles, like how the body got there, and held my interest throughout with its steady drip feed of reveals and permutations. The characters are pleasant and get on well, which is always a bonus. DS Andy Carter gets thrown in at the deep end because the investigation starts on his first day in Harrogate where he has transferred from The Met. As a city boy and outsider he is the perfect vehicle for introducing the beauties and dangers of the Dales to the reader. How he develops will make for good reading in future novels. DCI Oldroyd is an old fashioned copper who just wants to get on with his cases and has a nice line in denigrating management speak. Surprisingly (so nice to see the usual clichés turned upside down) for such a down to earth man who loves Yorkshire and its nature he is an Oxford graduate. He plays his cards and thoughts close to his chest, encouraging his subordinates, and thus the reader, to think for themselves. It's a clever device. The Body in the Dales is a good read which I have no hesitation in recommending.

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Excellent storyline. Wonderful main characters. I really enjoyed this book and would recommend it highly.

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Perfect for fans of Midsomer Murders, The Body in the Dales has everything that readers crave - an unusual murder, a wide cast of colorful suspects, a chocolate box village where everyone knows everyone, and a likable group of detectives led by an easygoing but brilliant DCI. Part of the attraction is the impossible murder.  Dave Atkins, a womanizer and all around despicable character is discovered dead in a cave system underground.  The journey to where he was found takes at least two hours - and it would be impossible to drag the body along.  Forensics shows the body was underground for at least a week, but a team of cavers had gone past this point a few days prior, and the body wasn’t there.  So The Body in the Dales isn’t only a whodunnit but a how done it. Naturally someone with caving experience is involved, but the close knit community is filled with cavers, and each and everyone has a motive.   DCI Oldroyd is an eccentric, but his kindly lackadaisical approach hides a brilliant mind.  He loves the Yorkshire Dales and its wild beauty, and is a dab hand at dealing with locals. DS Carter is newly assigned from London.  He quickly grows to appreciate the peaceful rural setting, and acknowledges that his experience in the city may not have fully prepared him.  There is a lot of gentle humor in their interactions, which is appealing. DCI Oldroyd and his team are human, likable. They have a tough job, but they use their brains as opposed to relentless bullying.   The Body in the Dales is a challenging, complex mystery that is certain to please fans of British police procedurals.  The characters, topic (caving) and setting keep the reader glued to the page, while there is (as in Midsomer Murders) the certainty that justice will be done and there will be minimal violence other than the murder(s).  I highly recommend this charming novel. 5 / 5 I received a copy of The Body in the Dales from the publisher and Netgalley.com in exchange for an honest review. — Crittermom

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To spot a book , especially a murder mystery , based on the area I live in was quite a surprise so I was eager to read and I was certainly not disappointed !. The book is fast paced in some places and deeply tense in others which is certain to keep the reader intrested from start to finish .

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This is the first book in the Yorkshire Murder mystery series, the case is an unusal one. The discovery of a body by a group of cavers. The body is identified as a local man Dave Atkins. An experienced caver, yet he is found without equipment or protective clothing deep within a cave system. How did he get there? Who put him there ?. DCI Jim Oldroyd and his team are called in to investigate. It seems Dave Atkins was a womaniser and had his fingers in many pies, most of which seem to have been illegal. No-one has a good word for him and the list of possible suspects grows quickley. This is a puzzling case with lots of twists, colourful characters and the most wonderful descriptions of the yorkshire dales. This is a really enjoyable read and I hope to learn more about Oldroyd and his team. Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for the chance to read this as an ARC

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A very solid British police procedural set in the Yorkshire Dales. First of a series, the story follows the the investigation of a body found deep in one of the local cave systems, or "pothole." Lots of local and caving lore, plenty of suspects and an intriguing trio of detectives. The detective unit includes quirky Detective Chief Inspector Oldroyd, local DS Stephanie Johnson, and a fresh-from-the-Met (London) DS Andrew Carter. Using a newcomer is a useful way to introduce the reader to the characters and the region, and is handled fluidly here. The initial murder is of a man so universally despised that the detectives think they will never be able to narrow the list of suspects down. There is no new mystery ground covered here, just a very solid, interesting mystery with fairly engaging characters. All the detectives like to keep their theories close to their breasts, which can get a bit annoying as a blatant attempt for suspense, but all three are intelligent and engaging. An absorbing, though not riveting, read.

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I absolutely could not put this book down. I binge on British TV on programs such as Midsummer Murders,Lewis, DCI Banks etc. (whatever we can get in the USA) and this book is in the same vein. Minimal use of expletives, no steamy sex, no gory murders. Descriptions of the countryside and the villagers dialogue is interesting. Information about the cave systems is fascinating and quite relevant in light of the recent world news coverage of the soccer team that was trapped in a cave in Thailand. Keeps you guessing as to, "who dunnit" and why. A good murder mystery. I would definitely read this author again.

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I really enjoyed this book. Overall, I found it to be well written with an page turning plot. The characters are believable and interesting and ones that you feel invested in reading about in future books. Being from Yorkshire I enjoyed the setting and how the author used the descriptions to add to the overall atmosphere of the book. I would recommend this book to anyone who loves a well written detective story.

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A body turns up in a cave in a small village in England. It turns out that no one feels too badly about this person's murder as he has wreaked havoc in the village making almost everyone a suspect and things difficult for the detectives assigned to the case. And since one murder is never enough, a second victim turns up just in time to complicate the case. Oldroyd, who is in charge is a very likeable character who prefers to work things out for himself but also runs things by his sister, who he refers to as his "Mycroft", to get some clarity on the situation. He leads a team of investigators, Andy Carter who is new to the area but not the job, and Steph Johnson who Oldroyd has some fatherly affection towards. The three of them make a great team and work tirelessly to solve the murders.. Ellis sets the reader up for the series by giving brief insight into the personal lives of the main characters without overshadowing the murder. I would definitely read this series and look forward to it. Thanks to NetGalley, J.R. Ellis and Thomas & Mercer for a free electronic ARC of the book.

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I really enjoyed this book. Having lived in Yorkshire for some years a lot of the places are familiar as is the beautiful accent. The characters are working well together and the story flows well. I really like the little nuggets of knowledge about caving. You learn something without realising it. Very good storytelling!

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A great insight into the Yorkshire Dales and it’s multitude of caves and potholes, and the crazy world of the people that explore them . Chief Inspector Oldroyd a cross between Wexford and Daziel. A fascinating story, well worth reading.

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A body is found in the caves. The victim is local to the area but not liked. When the body is brought back up the back of his head has been smashed in and he has no caving equipment or gear with him. How did the body get into the cave and what is the strange piece of metal that was found near the body????? It is ùpto D I Oldroyd and his team to solve this puzzle. This is another good murder mystery from this author. Again I had no idea who the killer was. It is set in Yorkshire, mostly in and around the Sales. It is beautifully written and the majesty of his description of the Sales is breathtaking. I loved this book. Another diamond from this author. I would like to thank the author J R Ellis, Amazon Publishing UK and Net.galley for giving me the opportunity to read this book in return for giving an honest review.

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Solid British police procedural. First in a series. Quirky detectives: DCI Oldroyd long-serving Yorkshire detective, DS Andy Carter a recent transfer from London, and DS Stephanie Johnson a local who appears on day two of the investigation. An impossible murder -- a body found in a cave where the murder could not possibly have occurred -- a victim no one liked -- and a large, but not too large, group of suspects. Wonderful descriptions of the locale. Believable characters. I look forward to more in this series

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As a police procedural, I found this book not bad at all. The police officers are personable and DCI Oldroyd is a very likeable and humane character. There is just enough of the personal lives of the police officers to add a bit of interest but not enough to take over the story which I find happens a lot in some of the modern stories and which I don't like. Lots of suspects and a few red herrings. The plot is quite interesting being set in an area of caving activity but the ending was a bit unsatisfactory, however, to say why would give the game away so I won't. Thanks to Netgalley and Thomas & Mercer for a digital copy of this book..

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First book in Yorkshire Mystery Series titled "The Body in Jingling Pot" on Goodreads. An easy read, good police procedural mystery. Good plot with a "who done it" feel. Looking forward fo reading The Quartet Murders by J.R.Ellis.

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Well done procedural elevated above the pack by the setting- the Yorkshire Dales. No one much liked Dave Atkins but no one expected to find his body in a cave. Then there's another murder! I very much enjoyed the details of the caving, something new for this genre. Oldroyd is the classic older lead and Andy Carter the loyal younger man. Steph, the dogged DS, is also a great character. Thanks to Netgalley for the ARC. This is a nicely plotted and written mystery.

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This is a really enjoyable, easy read. I really liked all the descriptions of the countryside and the characters. The descriptions of the caves made me feel as if I was there and I felt I met all the characters as well. I read this book in one sitting. I would definitely recommend this book and I am looking forward to reading more in this series. Thank you to Netgalley for my copy.

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I always like finding new mystery series to read and this was not a disappointment. Great setting and a good cast of characters. I thought the buildup was a bit slow and it took me a while to get into the story, but overall, it was a good, quick read and I will definitely continue the series.

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This felt like an old school murder mystery, think Sherlock Holmes etc. A young Met detective moves to Yorkshire and is thrown into a murder case on his first day. Really enjoyable. The only thing was the chapters were long so it made it difficult to stop reading....

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This was a well-written murder mystery located in modern day Yorkshire, England. I enjoyed the flow and quality of the writing and the story, but was really happy to read this book for other reasons as well: it focuses on the elements of the mystery, the police detectives process, and the characters without relying on gore, shocking language, and sex. In other words, the author's story-telling skills were excellent and allowed the reader to like the principal detectives enough to want to follow the team on other cases. The pace is not a thrilling page-turner. However, it lets the case develop in a way that keeps the reader's interest. I would enjoy others in this series. [This review was posted in Amazon and Goodreads.]

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I thoroughly enjoyed this book from start to finish. It is good strong whodunit police detective story written in a more gentle style than some with minimal gore, sex and swearing, making it suitable for a wide range of readers without being cosy in any sense. Set in Yorkshire (God’s own country) the descriptions of the landscape and the hobby of pot-holing are both interesting and informative. The main characters are well formed and you feel like you’re getting to know them already. There are plenty of suspects and possible motives for the murders in the story and the reader is kept guessing until near the end. Books two and three are already out and I think the stories would make a good television series, in fact throughout the book I could picture the actor Alun Armstrong playing DCI Oldroyd! Highly recommended for anyone who likes a good murder mystery.

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The Body in the Dales is the first in a series of police procedurals set in the Yorkshire Dales. A body is found in one of the series of caves often explored by cavers, and although it’s clearly a murder, the even more pressing question is how the body ended up there. DCI Oldroyd, DS Carter and DS Johnson discover that there’s no lack of people who hated Dave Atkins, a shifty cheat with money and with men’s wives. The premise of the mystery is eye-catching, and the characters of Oldroyd, Carter, and Johnson—as well as several minor characters, like Alison, Oldroyd’s sister, are developed and sympathetic. The plot tended to plod a bit in spots, too much backstory in parts, too much explanation in others. Readers can surmise characters’ feelings and motivations without being explicitly told what they are. The likability of the characters and the evocative descriptions of Yorkshire are the strengths of this first in a series. An entertaining read.

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Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for allowing me to review this book I really enjoyed this author and the way they crafted setting and characters. Highly recommend it.

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J.R. Ellis does an immaculate job of writing a story with great detail of surrounding areas as well as the dialect that one would use in that area. This is a very easy to read novel with enough questions raised to make the reade think. Overall, I felt like I was a pair of the story. The backstory that you get is just enough to allow the reader to make a connection to the characters involved. I think you should all read this one and see for yourself why it has faired so well. Thank you to netgalley as well as the author/publisher for giving me the opportunity to read this book in exchange for my honest review. 5+ stars ⭐️ out of 5

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The is the first in a series. Set in the Yorkshire area in England., A new detective comes to the department, Andrew Carter. His boss, Detective Chief Inspector Jim Oldroyd is very creative in his methods of finding the killer. The victim is found in the cave system called the Jingling Pot. Everyone in the community hates the victim because he has cheated them out of money or tried to take their women. I loved this book. The characters are so well described that you feel like you could step into the town. I have definitely found a new author to love. Once I finished this book I went straight onto the next book in the series.

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The Body in the Dales by J R Ellis. An enjoyable story and was one for me to read quickly . Good for start of a series of books. Hope I can read the others .

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I really loved this story. It was really well written and I enjoyed the plot line. It's twists and turns kept me so thoroughly impressed throughout the story. I enjoyed not being able to guess what was going to happen next. Highly recommended to anyone who loves mysterious stories.

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This murder mystery set in Yorkshire is the beginning of a new series featuring DI Oldroyd and his team. Originally titled “The Body in Jingling Pot”, it has recently been re-published as “The Body in the Dales”, a shame in my opinion as the former name has more character, stands out, and more accurately sums up what it’s about. At this point there are two more books to look forward to. A group of cavers discover a body deep underground in the Jingling Pot cave system. Clearly a murder, as the victim, an experienced caver himself, is not dressed for potholing and has been hit over the head, the police are perplexed as to why someone would carry a body so far, only to leave it in a populated caving route. DI Oldroyd, an old school detective, and his new DS, who recently moved from London and is finding his new environment a shock to the system, soon discover that the victim was highly unpopular in the village, being prone to seducing wives, swindling money and being an all-round selfish bastard. It seems like everyone has a motive, and many had the opportunity, so who did actually kill Dave Atkins, and why? This reminded me a lot of the early Peter Robinson books, and given this is the name of a minor character, I suspect this is not a coincidence. While a bit slow and with rather more information about the incomprehensible (to me) hobby of caving (which I had forgotten is known as potholing in England) than strictly necessary, this had good characters, a large cast of suspects and it was not obvious whodunnit. There is minimal swearing, violence and sex and the solution to the mystery relies on good old fashioned police work rather than forensics - Oldroyd fancies himself as a modern day Sherlock, or Poirot, and has their slightly annoying habit of keeping his deductions to himself until the big reveal - supposedly to help teach his juniors to think for themselves. I enjoyed this and will be reading the next ones soon, as I got them all for free from NetGalley in exchange for my honest reviews, so my thanks to the publisher, Amazon UK.

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A quick enough read, and I enjoyed the setting a great deal. I didn't find the overall plot compelling enough to be likely to continue the series, but I liked it well enough for one book. Perhaps that's a little unfair of me, as I think I might just be a little burnt out on mysteries. They all start to sound the same after a while.

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A body has been found in a cave system in Yorkshire. The victim, Dave Atkins, is from the local village and wasn’t particularly liked - he had a reputation as a womaniser and had had affairs with several women in the area. Detective Inspector Jim Oldroyd is investigating and his team has a new member - Detective Sergeant Andy Carter has transferred from the Met in London. Then another person in the village is killed - John Baxter had just phoned Oldroyd to say he had some information about the murder. A really enjoyable book to read - looking forward to reading number two in the series now. Thanks to Netgalley, Thomas and Mercer and J R Ellis for the ARC of this book in return for an honest review.

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Pot holing is my idea of a nightmare, so a body in a cave system is doubly horrifying. I loved the setting of this novel, and the detective is very old-school. - not much blood and gore, but plenty of solid police work. Looking forward to the other books in the series.

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This crime/procedural/whodunnit nicel is set in very rural Yorkshire. The poetic descriptions of the countryside luckily are not too long and bearable. The characters are cartoonish - very stereotypical bordering with offensive. The main crime fighter, DCI Oldroyd, is very likeable and a nicely weitten tribute to ACD’s Sherlock Holmes. He is the saving grace of this book. Spoiler alert - very annoyingly and in totally unbelievable way two other secondary characters fell in love! What for?? And what self-respecting woman would go for a social butterfly who just bedded a local tart??!! I may read the next in series to check what’s the crack with that! In overal - nice, easy read if you can overlook the cringeworthy bits.

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The Body in the Dales is the first book in a procedural series set in Yorkshire. It's an ensemble cast featuring a methodical and cerebral lead character DCI Jim Oldroyd and co. Originally published as The Body in Jingling Pot (a better title in my opinion) and released in 2017, this re-release is published by Amazon UK's crime imprint Thomas & Mercer and came out 9th August, 2018. This version is available in ebook, paperback and audiobook formats and clocks in at 320 pages. The pacing is very sedate and there is a large cast of secondary characters who aren't always clearly delineated. I did enjoy this book once I was a bit more invested in the characters, though that honestly took a while. The dialogue was competent and readable from the beginning, and though there wasn't much of a hook at the start, the book really did reward the effort to keep reading. A little side info: When I was a kid, my best friend's family were keen spelunking enthusiasts. I have always been a very bookish kid (big surprise there), but well, best friend and all, I tried my very best to get into caving along with her family. It never took with me at least, the breathtaking glittering caves full of secret beauty never outweighed the squishy muddy stodgy cold drippy reality of squeezing along in the near-darkness and hearing my own breathing interspersed with the occasional grunt and *dammit* of something whacking against a cave wall or low hanging hard surface. This book is about that. Lots and lots of that. It is pretty well written and entirely readable. It has a very 'English crime' feel and in a lot of ways reminds me of Deborah Crombie's Duncan and Gemma series. Obvious trigger warning, extreme claustrophobes need not apply. Four stars, I'll be reading the next books in the series.

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This is a four star mystery read! Along the lines of Midsomer Murders and DCI Banks this is set in a rural area of England. A dead body is discovered in a cave but how did it get their? Where was the murder scene? And how does the history of the area play a roll in the solutions. Ellis does a beautiful job of describing the area and his characters are terrific. This is a great weekend or rainy day read.

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This was a great idea for a plot; a body hidden in the network of caverns below the Yorkshire Dales; a victim universally hated, a new detective up from the city now trying to make it in a rural backwater; a work based romance, a campaigning vicar and an DCI with a broken marriage. It has it all .. but somehow still doesn't quite work. It felt stilted as though it was put together from separate pieces of writing rather than flowing seamlessly from different character view points developing the story line. Not sure it was really for me.

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I really enjoyed this police procedural set in Yorkshire. The mystery is interesting, well done, and just a bit unusual. There is minimal violence, actually there is barely any violence. It involves a body found in a difficult to reach area of a system of caves, and even though I know nothing about caving, the book was easy to follow. The author describes the caves so well, that you can almost feel the fear and uncertainty that accompanies a trip through a complex cave system. In fact, the caves really are the focus of the suspense in the novel, and are themselves the focus of a slight sideline mystery. The author has really researched caving and writes about it quite clearly. The ending was totally unexpected, but very plausible. I did find the book to move slowly and I sometimes felt that it was bogged down with too much detail. However, I would definitely read more by this author.

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And now onto Book 1 (yes, I read them out of order, LOL. Book 2 will be reviewed in a week or two!)! It was actually perfectly alright to read the books out of order, as Ellis gives you just enough info so you don't feel lost, but still makes you want to go back and read the previous books! In this book, Carter is new to the area and Oldroyd, is the old timer, set in his ways of solving cases and in knowledge of the Dales area. Like Book 3, there is no shortage of suspects and motives to want Atkins dead. but when the body count starts rising, the team realizes they might not have the answers they thought they did. As Oldroyd looks to the past for a clue, you may not see the ending coming! If you're looking for a new series for Fall reading, this might be a good one, as it only has the 3 books, and each one can stand alone! And with all the ebooks under $5

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Frankly, I just slogged through 2 of Ellis's mysteries in this series and I just wasn't interested enough to read a third. To summarize a bit of what I wrote for the other two, those books lacked tension and mystery and were filled with pages and pages of non information or information on the characters that were repeated time and time again. The books were "wanna be" Agatha Christie style, but were far from her excellence in writing. The books could have been better if they were edited. The last book was somewhere between 425 and 450 pages in book (paper) form and could easily have had 100-150 pages edited out.

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I would like to thank Thomas & Mercer Publishing and Netgalley for this partnership. After having read volume 2 before that one I am finally up to date in this series. When a body is discovered in a cave Olroyd and Carter investigate this mysterious death. The victim not being very appreciated that leaves quite a few suspects. Investigators ask themselves questions until one day a person who had information is found dead. This leaves investigators perplexed. A captivating thriller filled with suspense and twists. He kept me on my toes till the end. Can't wait to read volume three.

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Thanks Netgalley and the Publisher. Murder mystery set in Yorkshire and a beginning of a new series with DI Oldroyd, I absolutely loved this book and cannot wait until I start the second one.

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Thankyou to NetGalley, Amazon Publishing UK, Thomas and Mercer, and the author J. R. Ellis for the opportunity to read a digital copy of The Body In The Dales in exchange for an honest and unbiased review. I found the book to be well written. It was a good, quick read with likeable characters. I also liked the descriptive nature of the setting. Well worth a read. 3.5 stars.

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The first in the Yorkshire Murder Mystery series is imaginative, puzzling, complex, and frightening! This is a debut? You have my attention, Mr. Ellis! </b> 'Unless tha’s careful on thi ways, Providence Pot will end thi days. Deep under the Yorkshire Dales, cavers were scrambling along dark passageways. Apart from the eerie echoing of their voices, the only sounds came from water dripping on to their heads and gurgling down the shallow streams. There was the distant roar of an underground river. The dancing lights from their helmets illuminated the rocky walls and cast huge shadows into the heights above them. They were walking through a strange underground world of rock, mud and slime where the temperature remained at the same chilly level throughout the year and intricate systems of interconnecting tunnels plunged hundreds of feet below the surface. The slow action of water dissolving limestone over thousands of years had sculpted shapes like the cave art of a strange subterranean civilisation: long fingers of stalactites hung from the cavern roofs and stalagmites thrust in opposition from the floor. The cavers were still only halfway through the system. They were entering a long and fairly straight passage with a shallow stream in the bottom, about twenty feet high with rocky, uneven walls. The leader called back, ‘Easy bit here. We’ll stop for a rest soon.’ Echoing replies reached him in his forward position. As he splashed down the tunnel, he calculated the time and distance. Two and a half hours to get here, stop for food, another two and a half hours to get through to the end. It was a big responsibility, leading an inexperienced party like this. So many things could go wrong. People fell and broke limbs and it was hours before Cave Rescue could reach them. Reckless amateurs got lost in the labyrinth of passages and sometimes died of exhaustion and hypothermia. Suddenly his foot struck something and he tripped forward. His first thought was how stupid he’d been to allow himself to get distracted. He’d be the one who broke his ankle, and then they’d all be in serious difficulties. Whatever he’d stumbled against had moved and seemed soft. He looked down to illuminate the object and staggered back in shock. His lamp was shining on to a human head. The body of a man lay across the floor of the passage. Congealed blood covered the matted hair and the skull was smashed at the back. Two facts immediately struck the caver. First: the dead man was not wearing any caving gear. Second: he knew who it was.' ****** The Body in the Dales by J.R. Ellis is the first in the Yorkshire Murder Mystery Series. The first thing that struck me about this book was the characters as I was drawn to them immediately. By the end of the book, DCI Jim Oldroyd, DI Andrew, 'Andy' Carter, and DS Stephanie 'Steph' Johnson are firmly in my mind and I can't wait to see what they come up against next! The storyline is rich and creative, flowing briskly and fluidity with many interesting leads cropping up as the case progresses. There are a number of well placed twists and turns, creating difficult questions and making the puzzle of the case even more complex and even harder to solve. I enjoyed the entire storyline with it's mix of genuine and warm characters and the unique murder mystery. The story is set in the small village of Harrogate in the Yorkshire Dales, a beautiful place with many interesting and magnificent landscapes. The caves, known as potholes, with their stalactites, eerie darkness, and unpredictable dangers make for an ingenious, fresh and unique backdrop for a creepy murder scene! The Yorkshire Dales are also the home of the famous veterinarian James Harriet which gave me a warm glow as they are some of my favorite books. I was given all three books in this series by NetGally, the third one will be available for purchase in just a few days on the 13th of September. I started this book during breakfast and I just couldn't put it down, finishing it the same day! ⁣I'm reading book two right after this one, followed by book three, hopefully before the release date. It's truly a fantastic and addictive series!! Thanks to NetGalley, Thomas and Mercer, and J. R. Ellis for giving me all three books in the <i>Yorkshire Murder Mystery </I> series for me to read in return for my honest review. In a nutshell, I love this series and I can't wait until book number four comes out!!

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The first in a new series. DCI Jim Oldroyd , assisted by DS Carter (a newcomer from London) looks into a suspicious death when a body is found in a cave. The deceased is an unpopular local man and his murder is swiftly followed by that of someone who had information. The plot is intriguing with plenty of twists and turns to keep you interested and the descriptions of the dales give a lovely sense of place. You also learn about the characters personal lives which adds another dimension. I look forward to reading the next book in the series.

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The first installment of murder mysteries set in picturesque Yorkshire dales, The Body in The Dales was an interesting read, on many levels. Firstly, this was a book about intelligent Oxford-graduated detective who likes classical music and knows a lot of big words. Secondly, Oldroyd (detective) story and stories of the most characters are very human and ‘bodily’ warm. Thirdly, the setting is amazing. Yeah, I’d love to see the Dales for myself. Author did a great job of creating a setting, a place, an atmosphere. The mystery and suspense was even more alien, out of place, horrific and worrying because it happened in such a beautiful, restful and friendly place. A guy hated by all is found dead at the bottom of the cave. A new detective is in town. An old detective finds himself married to his job way more than he was married to his wife. By the end of the book a lot of knots get untangled. Some to be untangled in the next installments. J.R.Ellis need to be congratulated for writing a murder-mystery in such a way that every step on the road of solving the mystery is even more interesting than the actual ‘whodunit’. I am already reading the second installment. And, by the way, I found all the Schubert’s pieces Oldroyd listens to… worth a read and a listen.

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Previously self-published as The Body in Jingling Pot in Great Britain in 2017. I received this book from netgalley to review and I have to say I loved it! Colorful characters, a tough mystery to unfold, and all in a beautiful landscape..

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A "locked room" detective drama, set in the Yorkshire Dales. The scenery is vividly described but it's a shame the book was re-named as it's original title, The Body in Jingling Pot, is more apt and more fun. The characters have just enough back story to make them interesting, though I don't want to know any more about the Londoner Jason!

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The title of this book has now changed to The Body in the Dales. Personally, I think the Jiggling Pot was a catchier title. It's book 1 in the Yorkshire Murder Mystery series. I don't read a whole lot of police procedural books but this was interesting. I loved the setting and descriptions of Yorkshire. Definitely learned a lot of info on caves. A few times, I was getting characters mixed up but it was an enjoyable read. It was for me a hard mystery to solve considering the whole town disliked the dead man! * I was provided an ARC to read from the publisher and NetGalley. It was my decision to read and review this book.

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DNF at 46%. I enjoyed the scenes between the three police detectives but otherwise there are too many characters for me to keep track of. So much so that I can't even remember which people have been killed, who is a suspect, who is part of the investigative team, etc. And the story is just not compelling enough to keep me going (I tried for about 2 weeks). So, thank you to Amazon Publishing UK for a digital ARC copy of this in exchange for an honest review, but I just could not complete the book. (I did not give a rating on Goodreads, I simply marked it as "did not finish.")

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Riveting and addictive! A thrill ride from beginning to end! #TheBodyInTheDales #NetGalley *I received a complimentary ARC of this book from NetGalley & Amazon Publishing UK in order to read and provide a voluntary, unbiased and honest review, should I choose to do so.

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As with many traditional mystery stories, the novel opens with the discovery of a body. The man was found deep in a cave called "The Jingling Pot". He was not equipped with caving gear, and since there had been a team of cavers in that location just a few days previously, it was a mystery why they had not found him sooner. He had been dead for over a week. The victim is identified as Dave Atkins, a local rogue and financial speculator. He was an unpleasant man who was not liked by many - a fact that leaves the police with no shortage of viable suspects. Tasked with solving this puzzling murder are the West Riding Police team of DCI Jim Oldroyd (an experienced local man), DS Andrew Carter (in his late twenties, who has been newly transferred to Yorkshire from the Met in London), and DS Stephanie Johnson (a local girl with a traumatic background). This case is specially perplexing as Atkins' body was found some two hours into the cave system, parts of which were extremely narrow. It would be VERY difficult to transport a body through the cave. Also, it would have been near impossible for one person to do this on their own. Many of the suspects they encounter in their investigations are experienced cavers, some of them are even on the cave rescue team. It would seem that local knowledge is the key to solving the case. Motives are many, but HOW and by WHOM was Atkins murdered? MY THOUGHTS The police team in this novel were very engaging. The older, experienced DCI Oldroyd, the younger city man, Andrew Carter, and the attractive though troubled local girl, Stephanie Johnson. I enjoyed their interactions, and thought their characters were well-rounded. They came across as very 'real' people. As I mentioned earlier, the setting is one of my favourites. The Yorkshire Dales holds an endless fascination for me. The plotting was reminiscent of the traditional mysteries of Agatha Christie, Dorothy Sayers, etc. This made a nice change from the more convoluted thriller plots I've been reading recently. Written like a perplexing puzzle, the novel appealed on that level as well - I can never ignore a good puzzle. The ending of this whodunit was tied up neatly. Nothing far-fetched, just believable, sound police work. The coppers displayed keen observational skills and some astute knowledge of human nature. To my knowledge, there are three novels featuring this police team and I intend to read them all. Recommended!

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This was a good mystery. Chief Inspector Oldroyd is a believable character. The story moves with good supporting characters. I especially liked the descriptions of the caves as part of the mystery. I always enjoy when an author educates as well as tells a tale. This particular author allows you to see all the clues as the main character sees them so you get a sense of being part of the team solving the crime. I will read more of this author.

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Loved it! Great story, easy to read and follow through. What I especially enjoyed was the fact that Oldroyd welcomed the new detective, Carter, into his squad without any name calling, bitterness or back stabbing. In fact, all the Yorkshire police officers we met in the book accepted the new London born and bred Carter without any issue. That's a rare treat in today's police novels, when officers are so hateful to each other that it detracts from the story. Pot holing is my idea of hell, and this book certainly hasn't made it seem any more inviting. But despite the murder and mayhem, the description of the Yorkshire Dales is so wonderful it should be used by the Yorkshire tourist board. I definitely will be visiting certain parts of Yorkshire on my next holiday. A great story with believable characters and an investigative team who I took to my heart. Can't wait to read more by J R Ellis.

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Thanks to NetGalley and to Thomas & Mercer for an advance copy of The Body in the Dales by J R Ellis. I really enjoyed the setting of this novel. As an adopted Yorkshire lass, I have some idea how DS Carter feels, moving to the county from a big city. The topic appealed to me too. I've always had an armchair interest in potholing, so this story enabled me to experience the subject in greater depth - albeit still from the comfort of my own home. I found the story to be quite repetitive. Whatever the team found out was repeated every time someone new was brought in. And I wanted to skim-read these parts. I almost gave up reading, too, at once point. but I'm glad I soldiered on. Another thing that bothered me was the character confusion. There were so many characters with similar sounding names - Alan, Alice, Amy, Andy, Angela, Anne ... there's a Carter and a Cartwright and there's a Watson and a Watkins. We also had a Tom and a Tim and a Jim! And also, the same character was using different names for the same other character - for example, Oldroyd refers to the DS as both Andy and Carter, so it wasn't always clear who he was referring to. And finally, there was too much head-hopping for me, too many viewpoint changes - within the same paragraph at times. But it's a good tale, even if there are so many crimes wrapped up right at the end.

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Lots to like in this book! Great interesting location, peopled by lots of interesting characters and a unique mystery with a decidedly unusual twist. The two protagonists—the experienced old local cop and the new fresh-from-the-city detective—make a good team and an interesting dynamic. I had a little bit of a hard time at first keeping all the characters straight, but really liked learning about the wild location —the fells and caves of Yorkshire—and a mystery that added a unique and unusual twist to the usual. Offers something both familiar and new for fans of not-so-dark/traditional, but contemporary, English mysteries. Went on a bit, but I’d definitely read another in this series, and look forward to seeing more of these characters and the unusual environment they live in.

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I was sent this e-book, free-of-charge (yay!) by NetGalley, in return for an honest review. However it was yonks ago and I completely forgot to review it. Although it’s so long ago I can hardly remember it, I still feel I should do my duty and write a review. So here it is. From what I can remember I liked the characters, and found them believable, especially the relationships between the new “guy on the block” and the older Yorkshire bred police officers. It had a slowish start, and I did rather keep glancing down to see what percentage of the book I’d read, but I was engaged by about 20%, I think. That may also have been because I was reading it when I wasn’t in full health and so was tired. The central mystery of how the body got to where it was found was quite intruiging, and I was happy that I got to the answer before the police did!! The motive for the murder was — do you know, I can’t remember! I think it was believable (which isn’t always the case!) Sorry I can’t say much more, but I find I downloaded this – and presumably read it – over a year ago. Shame on me!! I will give it 3.5 stars, but have to round it up for Net Galley. I do wish it had a slightly less prosaic title though. It’s like those Ronseal adverts: It does exactly what it says on the tin. Well, this was about what it said in the title. There was a body. In the Dales.

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