Contempt of Court

This title was previously available on NetGalley and is now archived.

Buy this Book on

You must sign in to see if this title is available for request.
Pub Date 19 Jul 2018 | Archive Date 18 Jul 2018

Talking about this book? Use #ContemptOfCourt #NetGalley. More hashtag tips!


Description

Twelve years. Three jailbreaks. One fight for justice. 

To some he’s a thief, to others he’s a champion, to most he’s Alfred ‘Houdini’ Hinds, the most prolific jailbreaker in British history. Convicted for a high stakes jewellery robbery to which he pled his innocence, Hinds was sentenced to 12 years in prison in 1953. 

Contempt of Court is the seemingly improbable story of the next 12 years of Hinds’ life: the fugitive who escaped from three separate high security prisons and spent 248 days on the run; the convict who taught himself law in jail, the man who went on to win a libel suit against his arresting offer and gain a pardon from the court.

Hinds became a media darling and a public fascination but this, finally, is his story in his own words.  

Twelve years. Three jailbreaks. One fight for justice. 

To some he’s a thief, to others he’s a champion, to most he’s Alfred ‘Houdini’ Hinds, the most prolific jailbreaker in British history...


A Note From the Publisher

If you enjoyed reading Contempt of Court, we'd really appreciate seeing your honest review on Amazon. Thank you and happy reading, Agora Books.

If you enjoyed reading Contempt of Court, we'd really appreciate seeing your honest review on Amazon. Thank you and happy reading, Agora Books.


Available Editions

EDITION Ebook
ISBN 9781912194834
PRICE £4.99 (GBP)

Available on NetGalley

Send To Kindle (MOBI)
Download (EPUB)

Average rating from 6 members


Featured Reviews

Alfred (Alfie) Hinds was a renowned criminal from the 1950s who was convicted against all the evidence of a burglary from a furniture store and while serving the savage 12-year sentence for a crime he did not commit, ,managed to escape three times from prison before eventually winning libel case against his accuser, a police officer, and receiving a pardon and proving his innocence. Heady stuff indeed and Hinds uses this book to set the record straight. This is a reprint of his memoirs, first published in 1966, and they are still well worth reading as they provide a comprehensive account of how the criminal justice system worked - or rather didn't way back then. Hinds's memory is phenomenal as he apparently recalls verbatim conversations from many years previously but he writes well and with forensic detail and the book is never less than fascinating.

Was this review helpful?

Readers who liked this book also liked: