Autism Is the Future

The Evolution of a Different Type of Intelligence

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Pub Date May 01 2019 | Archive Date Jul 26 2019

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Description

In Autism Is the Future, Marlo Payne Thurman reveals how cognitive differences are the constructing pieces in understanding those with autism. Through her findings, she shows how those with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) constantly challenge assumptions about intelligence and measuring intelligence.

Thurman proposes that sensory and cognitive development have evolved together into a very different form of intelligence in those with ASD, and it should be viewed not as a disability but instead as a difference to be celebrated and followed.

Thurman began working with children diagnosed with ASD in 1986. With group home management and intensive ABA therapy in her early career, she developed a special interest in meeting the unique needs of those individuals who were asynchronously developed into the realms of the "ASD savant." Most recently, she completed a landmark study proposing an alternative sensory-cognitive difference theory based on her extensive discussions and interactions with diagnosed adults. This research was the foundation for this book.

In Autism Is the Future, Marlo Payne Thurman reveals how cognitive differences are the constructing pieces in understanding those with autism. Through her findings, she shows how those with autism...


Available Editions

EDITION Other Format
ISBN 9781941765890
PRICE $16.95 (USD)
PAGES 150

Average rating from 13 members


Featured Reviews

Excellent! Through and thought provoking.
In Autism Is the Future, Marlo Thurman reveals how cognitive differences are the constructing pieces in understanding those with autism. Through her findings, she shows how those with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) constantly challenge assumptions about intelligence and measuring intelligence. Thurman proposes that sensory and cognitive development have evolved together into a very different form of intelligence in those with ASD, and it should be viewed not as a disability but instead as a difference to be celebrated and followed.

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Ms Marlo Payne Thurman, Phd began working with children diagnosed with ASD in 1986. Marlo holds board positions with the US Autim and Asperger’s Association. Marlo has been recognized for her work by People magazine, the Special Educator, ADDitude Magazine, The New York Times, and National Public Radio as well as numerous local venues.
She completed a landmark study proposing an alternative sensory-cognitive difference theory based on het extensive discussions and interactions with diagnosed adults on the spectrum. This research was the foundation for this book.
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++ a copy of this book was offered in return for an honest, and unbiased review.
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With very little few accounts about autism by those affected in literature, and with the majority of Marlo’s own opinions and thoughts about autism, she decided to explore life experiences of seventeen adults who had been diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder. This study took about eighteen months, with six months simply conducting interviews.

She chose a research method that would allow her to understand detailed aspects concerning neurodiversity, as she wanted an insider’s perspective on cognitive difference and neurodiversity in autism. Volunteers were recruited from professional autism networks, social media pages, and from her own affiliation with the US Autism Association. On the seventeen individuals that volunteered, twelve were men and five were women, aging from twenty-one to sixty-three. Some where diagnosed as children, few (very) late in adulthood.

Initially, they, or their parents, were told they would never graduate, go to college, live independently, have true friendships, would marry or would have kids some later in life. However, most did surprisingly well later in their (professional) life, and have risen to highly skilled jobs, where others were forced to accept entry-level positions levels on for health reasons, despite being highly qualified.
Previous methods to understand those on the spectrum largely focussed on cognitive deficits, receptiveness or so called ‘splinter skills, and doctors or teachers are often at a loss what to do or how to help those with ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder).

Through interviews, we learn that even in those with a spectrum disorder, differences are paramount. Some are hypo- where others are hyper-sensitive to sound, light, smell, light, touch. Some don’t hear sirens, or alarms, whereas others can be bothered by the smell of other people. There are other huge differences between ASD individuals Some are exceptionally good at languages, and cannot do math, others can only do math and are very dyslectic. Gifted in one are, hopeless in many others. Surprisingly, some ASD individuals even consider themselves stupid, whereas their IQs are on the genius scale, as they often don’t appear to be very intelligent.

Since there seems to be such a different manifestation of cognition for ASD individuals, and standardized tests don’t work for them, maybe it's time we should ask ourselves what cognition really is? Marlo calls for a different approach on how to teach and help those with ASD and states that if you first learn ASD children how to cope with sensory input, their communication and overall performance will increase.

A superb read, highly recommended, the book offers great insight in what it means to be on the spectrum. Marlo gives detailed information about the differences in processing, memory, and how we learn and look at the world, in comparison to the neurotypical way of processing information.

Having been officially diagnosed at age 45 myself, this book has offered me true insight of how and what it means to be on the spectrum. The various intervieuws with the volunteers are very interesting to read and a added bonus to this overall very interesting book!
This book has been more helpfull than all those ‘therapies’ that forced me to ‘fit’ in and ‘act as everyone else’, for which I am forever greatly thankful to Ms Payne Thurman.
And I agree with her: It’s arrogant to believe that every individual sees the world in the same way!


***** 5 stars

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Having a child on the spectrum, I love to read new research and thoughts, beliefs, recommendations, and/or ideas.
I was in complete agreement with Thurman that without the "right" support and 'education" the "system (schools) may be failing children on the spectrum. Attempting to "treat as "all" vs looking at the individual.

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This is a really useful book. It has taken me a while to read it, as I’ve dipped in and out of it when I needed to. I’d recommend this to anyone with a child/partner who has ASD or someone who works with ASD children/adults.

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