Lost and Found

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Pub Date 10 Sep 2019 | Archive Date 04 Sep 2019

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Description

New York Times bestselling author Orson Scott Card's story of a boy with the power to return lost objects to their owners who is put to the test when his best friend disappears. 

"Are you really a thief?"

That's the question that has haunted fourteen-year-old Ezekiel Blast all his life. But he's not a thief, he just has a talent for finding things. Not a superpower-a micropower. Because what good is finding lost bicycles and hair scrunchies, especially when you return them to their owners and everyone thinks you must have stolen them in the first place? If only there were some way to use Ezekiel's micropower for good, to turn a curse into a blessing. His friend Beth thinks there must be, and so does a police detective investigating the disappearance of a little girl. When tragedy strikes, it's up to Ezekiel to use his talent to find what matters most.

Master storyteller Orson Scott Card delivers a touching and funny, compelling and smart novel about growing up, harnessing your potential, and finding your place in the world, no matter how old you are.

New York Times bestselling author Orson Scott Card's story of a boy with the power to return lost objects to their owners who is put to the test when his best friend disappears. 

"Are you really a...


A Note From the Publisher

Orson Scott Card, the author of the New York Times bestseller Ender's Game, has won several Hugo and Nebula awards for his works of speculative fiction. His Ender novels are widely read by adults and younger readers and are increasingly used in schools. Besides these and other science fiction novels, Card writes contemporary fantasy, American-frontier fantasy, biblical novels, poetry, plays, and scripts.

Orson Scott Card, the author of the New York Times bestseller Ender's Game, has won several Hugo and Nebula awards for his works of speculative fiction. His Ender novels are widely read by adults and...


Advance Praise

"A winning combination of wit, a twisted crime drama, and a fresh take on teens with powers."

-Kirkus Reviews

"Only a few authors have the ability to create characters that seem like real friends by the end of a book. Prepare to meet several in this absorbing and heartwarming coming-of-age story by master storyteller Orson Scott Card."

-Nicholas Sansbury Smith, New York Times bestselling author of the Hell Divers series

"Unput-downable, unmissable. Classic Card character depth that goes to the center of the Earth, and secrets that slowly unfold until the breath-taking, heart-lurching ending."

-Mette Ivie Harrison, author of New York Times Notable Book, The Bishop's Wife, and Vampires in the Temple

"A winning combination of wit, a twisted crime drama, and a fresh take on teens with powers."

-Kirkus Reviews

"Only a few authors have the ability to create characters that seem like real friends...


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Available Editions

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ISBN 9781982613419
PRICE $18.99 (USD)

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Featured Reviews

The protagonist of this narrative has the amusing habit of creating names for the people he encounters in his life; “Short Grade-School Girl” is the sobriquet for his first friend. Another example is the name sequence he imagines for the new school secretary: Mrs Nussbaum morphs into Mrs. Nuts-Bomb, Mrs. Nice-Bum, Mrs. Newsboy, Mrs. Sonicboom until he chooses Mrs. NutsBomb. In Lost and Found, Orson Scott Card crafts a fantastic and engaging story that is beautifully written as well as riveting. This new novel allows Orson Scott Card to remain one of my favorite authors. I highly recommend the book.

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Hello, I will be adding this review to my Instagram, Goodreads, and blog on September 9th, 2019. I will add the links to the reviews when they are posted. Thank you! Title: Lost and Found Author: Orson Scott Card Genre: YA Sci-fi Rating: 3.5 stars Publication Date: September 10th, 2019 eARC provided by publisher through NetGalley. All opinions are my own. Synopsis: "That's the question that has haunted fourteen-year-old Ezekiel Blast all his life. But he's not a thief, he just has a talent for finding things. Not a superpower--a micropower. Because what good is finding lost bicycles and hair scrunchies, especially when you return them to their owners and everyone thinks you must have stolen them in the first place? If only there were some way to use Ezekiel's micropower for good, to turn a curse into a blessing. His friend Beth thinks there must be, and so does a police detective investigating the disappearance of a little girl. When tragedy strikes, it's up to Ezekiel to use his talent to find what matters most." (Goodreads) My Review: The cover and synopsis is what pulled me in from the start as it usually goes. I had high hopes for this one and although it hit a few of them, there were parts to this story that just fell a tad short. Ezekiel Blast is full of sarcasm. He is a real "blast" to be around (I couldn't help myself, haha). He is pretty closed off until Beth makes an appearance into his life and its never the same. I enjoyed the character development for Ezekiel. He had dealt with loss at a young age and even some criminal issues that weren't warranted but came with his ability which inevitably labeled him as a thief. He was relatable because at times he wants to give up and forget what he can do but realizes that helping others outweighs the bad that can come with it. He is realistic with his choices and that's one thing I always enjoy about characters. Beth is a minor character but major in the plot and character development for Ezekiel. She isn't really shy but builds up walls around her because of her height, being bullied because of it, and family issues she is dealing with alone. She is very present in the beginning and because of the plot, steps into the back but is still on the mind of Ezekial. She was a decent character but at times it felt like her and Ezekial were one in the same when it came to their dialogue. It also felt this way with other characters and when everyone is saying sarcastic things it just isn't that appealing to read. The one thing that saved this book was the plot. At times it was very obvious as to what was going to happen and very unbelievable with how quickly things were solved. Even with these issues, I was still hooked with the plot and wanted to continue reading to find out how it would all play out. The micropowers are pretty micro in this story and it is more about the characters than the powers. Even though I had some issues with this book, it was still a pretty enjoyable read.

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3.5/5 stars - “...come on, this whole thing is crazy and borderline magical and if somebody told me the story he has to tell them, I’d kick him up in the loony bin.” This is a really great summary of Orson Scott Card’s upcoming YA novel, Lost and Found. The book is categorized as SciFi/Fantasy, but I’d call it Light SciFi with a dose of Thriller—which, honestly, is more my speed. In the novel, Ezekiel Bliss has a micropower—as opposed to a superpower—where he is able to reunite owners with their lost items. This unfortunately has caused people to distrust him in the past, labeling him as a thief because they assume that he must have stolen the items in the first place. After befriending Beth, he learns to use his micropower to do incredible things. I enjoyed reading this. I wasn’t the biggest fan of Ender’s Game (blasphemy, I know), so I was a little nervous picking this up. But that nervousness went away quickly. I liked that even though this had a SciFi element, it was really more of a mystery/thriller. I had some inklings about the plot twists, so they weren’t fully surprising but they were still effective. And I really liked Ezekiel. Some might find him a little too snarky. I think he had just the right amount of snark. He’d basically be my favorite student, albeit secretly. My only real complaint would be that some of the plotting seems rushed. I mean, there’s a lot of stuff that happens in under 300 pages. But other than that, this is a really solid YA novel from a well-respected writer. I’m thankful to #NetGalley that I had a chance to read it in advance.

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Lost and Found is a most human story from an author who has taken us to many other worlds. It’s a grounded approach that, at first, surprised me with its “day be day” beginning. What happens next in the narrative mingles reality with fantasy beautifully and it’s a clear display of Card’s gifts. This is the kind of book I would gladly share with middle grades/high school students and adults. More from this author, please.

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Thank you to Blackstone publishing for providing me with a copy of this book to read. I would give this book a 4.5/5 Star and deciding to round up instead of down for Goodreads because I truly enjoyed it! Summary: This follows a teenage boy named Ezekiel Bliss (or Blast depending on who you ask ;) ) who has a micropower that allows him to find lost items and return them to their owner. The only problem is how do you explain how you found the lost item and know exactly who owned it? This led to him becoming a social pariah known for being a thief. Ezekiel convinces himself that his life of solitude is a choice until Beth shoves her way into his life. He joins a group of people that meet and discuss their respective micropowers. Ezekiel decides that he should try to use his micropower for good regardless of what it would lead people to think of him thanks to the help and encouragement from Beth who ends up needing help in return. Opinion: I would consider this book to be on the cusp of middle grade to early YA fantasy. The concept of micro powers I found to be extremely interesting as they opened the door to a lot of potential cool powers that at the same time were not unrealistic like regular superpowers. The rules of each power were tested "scientifically" and did not go beyond the established boundaries. The world the Orson Scott Card built here is beautiful and based on a true growth in friendship and trust that did not feel rushed or forced. While I believe this book is meant as a stand alone (I could be wrong) this world opens up endless possibilities for future books based on Ezekiel (some more fantasy crime solving please!) Overall, the friendship that was built in the book felt solid and everlasting with (thankfully) no forced romance occurring between them, even if it was hinted in the future. The story kept me intrigued on what was going to happen next and I was invested into the characters since they were so well developed that I cared about how the plot worked out for them. If there are more books I will read them happily!

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Ezekiel Blast is a 14 year old boy with an unusual gift, he senses when objects are lost and returns them to their owners or to Lost and Found. Unfortunately other people, being cynical and suspicious, prefer to believe that Ezekiel is a thief (although why he feels the need to return things is never explained) and he has become a pariah, ostracised by his school-fellows and living a sad, solitary life with his father, the only one who believes him. Then two extraordinary things happen to Ezekiel. First, a new girl called Beth Sorenson, 13 years old but with a growth hormone deficiency and a metabolic disorder that makes her look like a proportionate dwarf, decides to make friends with Ezekiel, or at least travel in his "shunning bubble" on the way to school so she doesn't get bullied. It's the first time that Ezekiel has had a friend, although he finds her more of a nuisance at first. Secondly, Ezekiel is invited to take part in a study called 'Group of Rare and Useless Talents' which explores the boundaries of talents like Ezekiel's through scientific experiments. Then a policeman comes to Ezekiel's home, not this time to arrest him for stealing things but instead to assist with looking for a young girl who has gone missing. Although Ezekiel refuses to help the policeman at first, explaining that he finds objects not people, because people are never really lost, as he and Beth test his talent he finds he may be able to find people after all. The first half of this book is everything I would expect of a young teen novel. Funny, clever, full of the trials and tribulations of being a child, especially a clever child, in a world where adults rule. Obviously it's Orson Scott Card so the writing is witty and engaging right from the get-go but like his other young adult series, the incomparable Ender's Saga, there is a dark and scary undertone. When tragedy strikes (and it is shocking) Ezekiel must put his new found skills to their limit. I loved this book although I found the adult theme shocking for a teen novel, maybe that's a sign of my age, so I would recommend parental caution if the reader is a young or sensitive reader. I received a free copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley in return for an honest review.

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3.5 stars rounded up to 4 Thanks to NetGalley and Blackstone Publishing for providing an advanced reader copy of the novel Lost and Found by Orson Scott Card. Ezekiel (never Zeke) has the unique gift of being able to sense lost things and who they belong to. It’s not a superpower, he isn’t a superhero, and as he gets older, he finds that it isn’t always the most useful of gifts. Rather than being seen as a hero, he is shunned by his peers and suspected by the police for being a thief. After all, who could find so many lost objects and return them to their owners if they weren’t the one that stole them in the first place. That begins to change when a detective asks for Ezekiel’s help finding a missing girl and then when someone close to Ezekiel is kidnapped, it really begins to hit home. Ezekiel learns how to open himself up to others and let them in. He learns how to value himself and be valued by others. Having read and enjoyed Orson Scott Card’s Ender’s Game series I was thrilled to find this new novel by him and I wasn’t disappointed by the story, the characters, or the writing. At first, I had a hard time connecting with Ezekiel’s personality. He came across as very cynical and disconnected but as his relationship grows with Beth and Shank I found my relationship growing with him as well. By the end of the novel when he realizes that he was just as lost as the objects he was able to find, I found myself excited for him to be found and to realize that he was important to the people in his life, after all, everyone needs rescuing. Though I wouldn’t recommend the novel to everyone and it is certainly different from Card’s other novels, this was still a fun quick read that deserves its spot on my shelf.

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This book was very different from what I expected, but it was great! Lost and Found told the story of a boy, Ezekiel, who had a “micropower” of finding lost things and returning them to their owner. This micropower got him in trouble in his younger years (due to owners thinking he stole their possessions), but when Ezekiel gets introduced to a girl who believes him, a detective who trusts him, and a group of kids who also have micropowers, he begins his adventure of self-discovery. I thought this one was very good, though it did have/mention some sensitive topics (i.e. child abduction, murder, etc.).

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I loved all the witty banter between characters. The story was fast paced, and engaging. It held my attention from start to finish. Orson Scott Card has always written thought provoking young adult stories, and this one doesn't disappoint. The only negative would be that at times there are big chunks of dialog with little action, but then this is a galley proof so no big deal. Overall, the story is interesting and original. A very good read.

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This was an enjoyable read. The characters were well written and the storyline was engrossing. I would consider this book appropriate for younger readers as well. I really hope that this is the start of a series, because I would like to read more of Ezekiel 's adventures.

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The plot of this book starts off with two isolated kids becoming friends. One is outwardly different, while the other is different in a whole other manner. As the book puts it, he has a micropower that allows him to notice things that are lost and know who it belongs to. As you could expect, this puts him in a bit of trouble, since people believed he was stealing the objects and not just finding them. This leads a desperate detective trying to win his favor and help him find a kidnapped girl and the story kind of spirals from there. I won't go into further detail because this is all you really need to know to get you curious. I really enjoyed this book and the characters. I'm assuming most people will find them to be condescending and rude, but I think they're funny and upfront. You have to remember though, that the main character hasn't really had much social contact with other kids his age, so his social skills kind of suck for the most part. The other part is that he's had a shitty life of isolation and being shunned, so being an ass is basically a defense mechanism at this point. I know most people will be interested in this book becasue the author is famous for having written Ender's Game, but I actually hated the movie, which I know has nothing to do with the book, but you can usually glean enough to have an idea of the book. Let me tell you right now, this is a completely different genre and style to Ender's Game. For one, it's not sci-fi space adventure, though there is an aspect of "supernatural". I will admit though, there are some aspects that are too coincidental, like the fact that for the larger part of his life, no one believed him that he wasn't a thief and then suddenly there's a handful of people that believe him and suddenly everything exciting is all happening at the same time. But! It was still a very pleasant and fun read and I very much enjoyed it since I pretty much read the entire thing in one day, I had read only 10 or so pages the day before and finished the rest of it the next day. So I would definitely recommend this book to anyone that wants to read something intriguing, but can overlook the few flaws that are present.

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I want everyone to read this book so we can talk about it. It's one of those books. Recommended: yessssss ♥ For people who also adore Orson Scott Card's work, for those who want immediately deep and lovable characters, for an intriguing exploration of unique tiny magic that will have you thinking about what your micropower might be. For lovely warm fuzzies enhanced by the incredible darkness woven together Thoughts: Oh, lord. I saw Orson Scott Card on a new book on NetGalley, and when I got that approval message, I jumped up, clapped in delight, and shouted "YES!!!!" (luckily my boyfriend is pretty used to my book-thrills by now). I really tried to keep my expectations down, because overhyping something in your mind can ruin it, but I love Orson Scott Card's work so much that I just couldn't tamp down my hopes. And you know what? LUCKILY IT DIDN'T MATTER, BECAUSE IT WAS SO GOOD. Reasons this was so good - characters you immediately love from the first conversations - every conversation MATTERS. No space fillers - you will be drawn into the debates and think deeply on your own questions of fairness, evil, death, love, friendship, bravery, and so much more - a delicate and realistic balance of light and dark that perfectly reflects reality - an ending that lingers, and makes you think about yourself and all others a bit differently, a bit more thoughtfully and kindly - A touch of magic, but written in such a way that you have to wonder if it's really magic, or if we just overlook the wonders of the world without recognizing how incredible people can be Read this. Then get back to me with what your micropower might be. I'm still thinking on mine. Thanks to Blackstone & NetGalley for a free copy to review.

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Orson Scott Card writes thoughtful, insightful scifi. This book is no exception. As with many of Card's teenage protagonists, the main characters in this book are too smart to EVER talk like a normal teen. They are smart, sarcastic, and have problems with authority figures. Those problems are justified (as you soon discover), but this makes the lives of the characters that much harder. Ezekiel (never Zeke) has a talent for finding things. He always has. The problem is that when you constantly return things that are "lost", people suspect that you are the reason they were missing in the first place. This has lead to his being a Pariah in his little town. This all changes when Beth comes to town. The two become friends and Ezekiel's life begins to undergo major changes. The characters were above average in many ways, but flawed. This made then more relatable. As dis Ezekiel's angst. The story itself is small but filled with enough world building and action that you won't want to put it didn until you are through. I believe it is technically a YA novel and would certainly fit, but older audiences wel enjoy it as well. Really, fit for anyone who likes a drama filled sci-fi story or who wonders what happens to those whose superpowers aren't that powerful. Thank you to the publisher and Netgalley for the opportunity to read an advance copy if this work.

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A very solid 4.5 stars, which I will round up because I enjoyed it so much and had to force myself to stop halfway through so I could catch some sleep! I ended up finishing it on the plane at midnight with a satisfied sigh. So why not a 5 star rating? I think it's because the mystery of the first girl seemed to be resolved a bit too quickly, and then it was fairly easy to predict how it would end for the second part. It didn't take away from my enjoyment of the story and yet, I wish it had been a bit more balanced. So what did I love about the book? I loved the characters. I loved the banter that Ezekiel had with others, especially his dad, Shank, Beth, and "Banshee". I have always loved the author's writing style and these conversations are intelligent without being condescending. The idea of "micropowers" was very interesting and I loved how the characters explored and talked through what they were feeling or thinking of, etc., so that they could figure out how they might work. The friendships Ezekiel eventually developed as he learned what friendship was and who really mattered to him were also very enjoyable to read about. I would probably categorize this as young adult rather than middle school age, mostly because some of the topics mentioned (kidnapping, child trafficking/pornography, death) might be tough for some younger readers. But an older middle schooler could probably handle it. Thanks to NetGalley for providing an ARC in exchange for an honest review.

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Another great book from Orson Scott Card. I’ve read other books by this author this one was just as good as those. I really enjoyed the story and the characters were well thought out.

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I saw this on NetGalley and snatched it up based solely on the author, Orson Scott Card. After I downloaded it I looked at the description. It actually sounded like an interesting plot idea too. I devoured the book. This ARC is in a kind of rough state, so I half wonder if the cover might change. have another book that is in much better shape and it is not set to release until October of this year. This one comes out in September. First, imagine that you can see something lying on the ground like a scrunchy, and just know where the owner is so you can return it. Cool, right? Not for Ezekiel, who was repeatedly accused of stealing the very thing he was returning! Nobody wants to be friends with a thief. So now, he just tries to ignore the things he finds. Beth, a really short high school kid, enters his life, wanting to be his friend, and stubbornly refuses to leave him alone no matter how rude he is to her. Finally, a cop comes and asks for his help in finding a little girl. Yeah, AFTER cops spent his whole life accusing him of stealing, NOW they want his help! Right! He learns he is not the only one with micropowers. He is invited to a group of others like him that have pretty useless minor little powers. Like the ability to make someone yawn. So, no, not cool like the X-Men. The Writing Ummm. This is OSC! He is a master! He teaches other writers how to write! He literally wrote the book on How to Write Science Fiction and Fantasy. I have it on my shelf! Of course, it was excellently written! Now, as far as I know, he hasn’t written YA before. I don’t think he has even written a realistic fiction book with a smidgen of paranormal. So how did he do with YA? Great. My only issue is that the characters felt a little bit younger than they actually were in the story. They were supposed to be 9th/10th grade, but they seemed more like 7th/8th grade to me. I teach middle school, so I am pickier than the average Joe on things like that. Regardless, the dialogue was really snarky and the relationship between Ezekiel and Beth was fun! AND It wasn’t a book where the parents were non-existent clueless imbeciles. THANKYOU Mr. CARD! Ezekiel’s mom was dead so she was not there, but the dad was there. Ezekiel actually told his dad some things and they talked. Not many YA books do that very much it seems. Who will like this? If you liked Ender’s Game, you might give this one a try. The dialogue and characters in both are excellent! If you like a story about friendships and loss and parental relationships, then you’ll like this. If you enjoy some amateur sleuthing with a bit of paranormal powers, you’ll love it! I think I’ve gushed about this book enough…just go read it!

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Ezekiel has a micro power. One where he finds lost things and can find the owners. It’s a compulsion that he hides after being accused of stealing, even though he’s never stolen a thing in his life. Then he meets Betty and she starts asking questions and forces him to start testing his powers to see if there are boundaries to it and if it can be useful in the grande scheme of things. After being asked, by a resourceful police officer in the hunt for a kidnapped little girl, if he might be able to find her, Ezekiel discovers new things about his powers. When his friend goes missing he has to put his new knowledge to the test in a race against time. What an amazing story. The idea that we all may have micro powers that we don’t even notice because they’re so small or unnoticeable and that if we just focus on them we may be able to find uses for them. This is a coming of age story, not just for Ezekiel, but for Betty and the others involved. They must face the reality of how twisted and depraved humans can be and they start to become less selfish and more self aware. It was sad at times but it did make an impact. The sassiness of the characters is what really did it for me though. I love me some sass.

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Instead of superheroes, this book has "micro" heroes. Because no one can fly or use any of the awesome powers comic heroes normally have, but some rare individuals have a small unusual talent that's more comical than practical. Until a situation arises where Ezekiel's ability can save the day. This story wasn't just about using powers. It was also just as much about friendship and family. The characters are precocious teens, like Card's Ender's Game. So they're constantly using high vocabulary terms and over philosophizing every idea. I liked Ezekiel's father's profession. It's pretty rare to see in a book, though it's common enough in real life. But it added a very interesting dimension, and he's an amazing father. The idea of micro powers had me wondering about them in real life too. Some of the ideas and topics brought up in this book deserve a PG13 rating. I definitely don't think younger kids should be reading this. Aside from that, the characters, plot, and emotional impact were terrific. There's great banter here (a bit too much at times, but that's what skimming is for). I really enjoyed the characters' relationships and interactions, and I liked the micro power abilities. I'd take a useless ability any day over having zero ability. It was a great book, and I definitely recommend it. I received a copy through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

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High school freshman Ezekial Blast — pariah, outcast, weirdo. Until one day a “short” girl who looks seven but is in fact fourteen — asks if she can join him in his “shunning bubble” as protection on her way to school. Ignoring his reluctance and his loud and repeated requests for silence, she rapidly becomes the best (and in truth only) friend he has ever had. Ezekial has a “micropower” — he sees “lost” things everywhere and feels a compulsion to return them to their owners whose location he always “knows.” In the past, this “talent” has earned him nothing but accusations and interrogations — how could he have these things and know to whom they belonged to unless he stole them himself — but now a relatively reasonable police man is asking for his help in locating a missing girl… Ezekial is the epitome of Card’s signature snarky and ultra-intelligent teenager. Creative, full of self exploration and realization, this will appeal to misunderstood teens everywhere.

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I love Orson Scott Card. This man could write a phone book and make it interesting. Lost and Found tells the story of Ezekiel (do NOT call him Zeke) and his pain-in-the-neck, never-let-him-alone, annoyingly persistent schoolmate. Or friend. Or, well,... let's not get awkward. Ezekiel finds things. Big things, small things: toys, strange shoes, a bicycle once. And dozens upon dozens of lost hair scrunchies. He has determined not to turn them into the Lost and Found, or-God Forbid-return them to their owners as this has caused most of the problems in his young life. This was a pre-release galley proof, so there are one or two hiccups that passed through how many proof-readers? For instance, one conversation where a response was attributed to the wrong character. A couple of interactions seem out of sequence. Also, there appears to be some confusion about local, county, and state police forces and how they interact with the FBI. These errors dont really detract from the storytelling, I'm just a little OCD about the details. Card does a great job of fleshing out even minor characters and I found myself rooting for some of the most unlikely. School guidance counselor, anybody? He also addresses; fatherhood, God, grief and loss, and some truly odd and amazing talents. Speaking of talent, this author proves it takes one to shine the light on other's.

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Lost and Found was about one of the best books that I have read in a long time dealing with differences. Some of the most notable “differences” were a father raising his son, a teenager dealing with ostracism from his peers, and a young girl dealing with life as a “proportionate little person”. I would definitely recommend this book to my students because it would be a great way to give perspectives on real-life situations.

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What a great book! I read it in one sitting. A boy who finds lost things and attempts to reunite the lost thing with its owner...except he has been accused of stealing the item in the first place too many times. The characters are great. You will laugh at some of Ezekiel's (NEVER Zeke!) thoughts and think, "Yeah, I remember thinking the same thing." Ezekiel can only locate the owner of a lost item. That's his 'micropower'. It only works on things....or does it? Orson Scott Card never disappoints!

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This review is based on an ARC of Lost and Found which I received courtesy of NetGalley and the publisher (Blackstone Publishing). If you gave me this novel to read without the byline I’d assume it was by someone I’ve never read before. If you then told me that it was by a certain beloved sci-fi author who goes by three names, I’d assume either 1), you are a liar or 2), Orson Scott Card has a ghostwriter. I’m torn between thinking that Card is a phenomenal author for his ability to morph his writing capabilities into something entirely new and separate from the Enderverse and thinking that he lacks his own voice since I had no idea—except maybe through the power of suggestion—that this was an Orson Scott Card novel. Lost and Found is described as a Sci-Fi YA novel but I’d be more inclined to label it Magical Realism. (There’s a very fine dividing line there, but still.) In a word Lost and Found is unputdownable. From the very start, I was intrigued and the curiosity never faded out. Up until the last page, I was wondering what would happen next, and next, and next. This novel put me in a “just one more chapter” mood. It revamped my love of reading and took me out of the slump I’d been suffering! The humor of this novel is what was really endearing to me. This novel reads so much as if it comes from the head of an adolescent boy it’s almost scary. I really, really felt like Ezekiel and Beth were real people come to life, and sometimes I’d realize that they’re fictional and get a little sad. I love their platonic (possibly someday more) friendship and the dynamics of their relationship together. I loved Beth’s unique character and the notion of micropowers. Basically, this book is an awesome addition to the Magical Realism and YA genres both, by an incredible author whom I didn’t expect a story like this to come from. I hope Lost and Found does well because I can see this being a well-loved book. "Everything fades and goes away. But while you have it, be glad of it.”

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This was a lot of fun and there were a lot of twists in the story. I knew absolutely nothing about the book, just the author. I have been a huge fan of Orson Scott Card for many years. He wrote Ender's Game, in case you didn't know. I guess you could classify this as science fiction. Ezekiel is an outcast in his town because he has a special ability that he has had since he was a child. He finds things. If he sees something someone has lost he knows who lost the item. As a much younger child he would bring the item to whoever had lost it. Naturally if someone showed up at your house and claimed they "found" your child's bicycle you would automatically suspect the finder had something to do with the item missing. How else would they know who it belonged to? The police also suspected Ezekiel having something to do with all of the items he would constantly find. This caused most of the people in his town to avoid him at all costs because they thought he was a thief. Ezekiel lives a mostly solitary existence until a 14 year old girl who looks 7 decides to join him in being avoided by everyone. He doesn't want her company and she doesn't care. This is a humorous adventure mystery romance sci-fi story about life. WARNING! You might cry during a few parts. The only thing that disappointed me about this book was that it ended. It had a great ending but I want more. I really hope there will be a sequel or even a series. The story has so much more potential

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Lost and Found is a book of everyday superheroes. Labeled “micropowers” by the characters, these powers are things that seem useless to those who have them - none more so than Ezekiel, who sees no use to his power of finding lost objects like scrunchies (since who would want a dirty scrunchie back?). Throughout this story of friendship, loss, family, and loneliness, Ezekiel finds out just how powerful these small micropowers can be. I found the characters to be wonderfully weird and likable. Ezekiel, his dad, Beth, and Shank in particular - and even the side characters - are intriguing. Their relationships delve into the ideas of what it means to be a friend or a family. I thought this story developed very well. By a little less than halfway through I was hooked so much that I couldn’t put it down for the rest. Part mystery story, part superhero tale, and part story of family, friendship, and coming of age, this book has quite a bit of depth to it. I would be interested to read more about these characters and the others with micro powers and how they develop in future books. Many thanks to the publisher and to NetGalley for the free copy to review in exchange for my honest opinions.

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4 1/2 stars rounded up. I actually loved this book. Ezekiel has a knack for finding lost things and knowing who the owner is. Only problem is, when he used to try to return them, the cops got involved, assuming he was the one who took it. Beth has proportional dwarfism, so even though she is 14 years old, she looks like a 6-year old- a very witty one. Add to that some micro powers and you have an extremely engaging read that kept me smiling throughout. These two unlikely characters come together in a funny collision of banter and self-discovery. I loved their relationship, loved the dad and his support for his son, and loved Shank and his role in the book. This book does discuss topics such as kidnapping, sex trafficking and death. Probably for YA and older. I would allow my pre-teen to read this only if I was there to have discussions about what is presented- all the deep stuff.

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I am a huge fan of Orson Scott Card and actually own nearly all of the other books he has published, so I was quite excited to come across this one and have the opportunity to read it. Ezekiel Bliss, or as he calls himself, Ezekiel Blast, is a teenager with an usual ability to find lost things and know enough details about the owner to return them. To many this may seem a super power of both, however, he has become somewhat of a pariah in his school as fellow students, teachers, and law enforcement deem him a thief and liar. To them, someone could not possibly be able to find so many lost things and not be the thief. Alone with his widowed father, he lives inside his head and does not bother interacting with others until short but big-hearted Beth comes into his life and he finds the friend he did not know he needs. With her help and others, he is able to improve his micro power and help others who need who desperately need it. First of all, Card is a fabulous writer. This is no secret. He is widely recognized and a favorite of many. His prose is fantastic and I enjoy all of the books that I read of his. My only caveat concerning this in Lost and Found is that the beginning was so slow. The banter and mindless conversation, while often lending to getting a better feel for the characters, dragged on more than I would have liked. I'm a wordy person and do not mind pretty, lengthy writing, however, it was still a bit much for me. The quirkiness of the book plus the dragging beginning may have prompted me to put down another book, but not Orson Scott Card. Nope, I was sticking in it for the long haul. And the results: It was really a great book! Once I got past the first third of the book, it really sped up and held my interest. In spite of the beginning dragging, I thought the plot line, excellent writing, and character development, makes this book worthy of 5 stars. One other critique that really annoyed me was this book is a YA, but there is bad language at various points that really bothered me. It literally adds nothing to the story except really annoying me and making it inappropriate for young adults. This has been an issue in many of Card's other books and I keep hoping the language will eventually be cleaned up. Once again though, this book was overall a pretty fantastic book. It was thought provoking and the characters are very engaging. Because of their very different personal lives, I had a hard time relating with the main characters on a personal level, yet much of the statements they made or realizations about life in general really resonated to people in general and still made their characters interesting and likable. None of the main characters in the book are perfect, but they try their best to be good and decent people, and that is something that most people should be able to relate to.

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Here's an unusual and compelling new YA mystery from famed author Orson Scott Card. His premise in Lost and Found is that not all psychic talents are superpowers, but even micropowers can make a very big difference. Fourteen-year-old Ezekiel Blast has a micropower, a talent for finding things. It has made him an outsider, till he's befriended by the very determined Beth, a 'proportionate dwarf and a genius. Together, they are embroiled in a mystery and in danger. As always, this is another superlative read from Orson Scott Card, who excels at banter between his characters, as well as engrossing plots.

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Card is a very diverse writer and this book is no exception. I love the fun language with sarcasm that seems to follow the main character, but he is so funny and sincere. I like the relationship between father and son and how he interacts with Beth. I would defiantly recommend this book, unlike any other Card book I have read, but still fun and insightful and contains a range of emotions that you will experience while reading. I received an advance reader copy in exchange for a fair review.

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I received this from Netgalley.com for a review. Ezekiel and Beth are 14 yr old geniuses in 10th grade and total awkward outcast weirdoes. They have micro powers, which is not the same as super powers. This is my first book by this author and I truly enjoyed it. Great read. 4☆

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Publisher: Blackstone Publishing Date: September 2019 ISBN: 9781982613419 Genre: Fantasy/ YA Rating: 4.2/5 Publishers Description: “Are you really a thief?” That’s the question that has haunted fourteen-year-old Ezekiel Blast all his life. But he’s not a thief, he just has a talent for finding things. Not a superpower-a micropower. Because what good is finding lost bicycles and hair scrunchies, especially when you return them to their owners and everyone thinks you must have stolen them in the first place? If only there were some way to use Ezekiel’s micropower for good, to turn a curse into a blessing. His friend Beth thinks there must be, and so does a police detective investigating the disappearance of a little girl. When tragedy strikes, it’s up to Ezekiel to use his talent to find what matters most. Review: Snarky, quit witted and fun rounds up the adjectives for this novel. OSC weaves a tale that draws you in from the beginning by building a myriad of characters with depth. Nothing fancy or overt, just subtle writing at it’s best.

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The only thought that was going through my brain when I was reading this book was "so good, it's just so good." I really enjoyed reading this book. Ezekiel Blast has this small but powerful ability to just know about lost items and needs to return them to their owners.( including disgusting hair ties on the side of the road). Unfortunately this precious ability isn't all what it cracks up to be when he is labeled a thief when he is young and he can never shake it. At age 14 he doesn't have any friends, until Beth comes into his world. Then things start changing. He has a friend, he's going to a group that studies their small and sometimes annoying powers, like the girl who has the power to make people yawn. Like big time. But when a Detective asks Ezekiel for help finding a lost girl, at first he says no, but after returning some lost items with Beth, he helps with the investigation. Then Beth goes missing....

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Thanks to the publishers for sharing this one. It's heartwarming and sweet, and I liked the weird micropowers. My full review appears on Weekend Notes.

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Orson Scott Card has a lovely way with words and a lovely way with a story, and this is no exception. I was captivated by these sweet young people and their journey of self-discovery and adventure.

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***Thanks to NetGalley for providing me a complimentary copy of LOST AND FOUND by Orson Scott Card in exchange for my honest review.*** Lost and Found focuses on Ezekiel Blast, a high school student who has a talent for finding things. He has a knack of returning all these lost items to their owners, but it has also made for a bad reputation for him. Follow along as Blast attempts to turn his life around in a way that only Orson Scott Card can write. I absolutely loved these characters and their backstories. This book is one that every one needs to consider reading. It really speaks loudly to the issues that are becoming much more prevalent in today's society and to our 'future generations.' What if having mental health issues actually highlights certain aspects of our brains and gives us these unusual talents? Looking at these issues that a majority of us have to deal with, whether we require treatment for them or not, helps to bring a real light to them instead of this faked acceptance. Add in the continued bullying that faces a majority of high school students, and it is a premise that I feel most people can relate to. As with all of Orson Scott Card's books, he kept me guessing where the book was going to head. What I thought the book was going to be about, abruptly changed and kept me intrigued in what would happen next. Let's just say that Card continues to have a few aces up his sleeve. Card wrote a book that relates to now and I imagine that it will become another classic for our future generations to learn from. Originally I thought, that this book didn't deserve a full set of stars in the rating because I wondered when I would ever re-read it. Once you read it once, would I need to pick it up again? But when I thought about it some more, I realized that I would. There are small clues and hints to pick up with each reading and the moral of the story doesn't change: maybe we are all just lost... Thank you Blackstone Publishing and Net Galley for the opportunity to read this book.

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Another wonderful book from the mind that gave the world Ender’s Game and so many others. An absolute must for Sci-fi fans

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Orson Scott Card has a fantastic writing style that provides such a compelling and put-together story. Lost and Found had me hooked - I didn’t want to put it down and I just had to know what would happen next, all while loving every moment of this fun and unique story. Ezekiel can find lost things. He’s not sure why he has this usual talent and it has certainly made his life hard, especially when everyone - from his classmates to the police- think he is a thief when he returns the lost items to their owners. His new friend Beth, a girl with her own reasons for staying away from other people, tries to convince him that his talent has the power to help people and encourages him to experiment with it. Then Ezekiel is approached by a police detective who thinks Ezekiel may be the key to solving a little girl’s kidnapping. I love YA mystery novels, yet sometimes the reason for the teen to be involved in the detective work is a stretch at best or seems a little unlikely. Not so in Lost and Found. Yes, perhaps Ezekiel’s micropower stretches the boundaries of reality but the world that is built around the story makes complete sense. Ezekiel is not the only one with a micropower and the sections of the book devoted to him meeting others with similar but unique seemingly useless powers are fantastic additions to the story. As Ezekiel discovers more about the possibility of the existence of mircopowers, comes to accept that his ability to locate and rehome lost items is a micropower and starts to experiment with this ability, he earns his place as a junior detective. And it turns out he is pretty good at it. I loved Ezekiel’s voice. Loved his sense of humour and self-depreciation. Having been labeled by the police, by teachers and peers, he expects little from those around him. Ezekiel has a colourful and unique way of viewing his world, or labelling and spinning the details he sees, and he tells the hell out of his story, with his own unique twist. It also makes him an unreliable narrator - there were a few times I had to do a double take at some of the names of streets, for example, only to realise later that Ezekiel has a thing about renaming things and people. I loved, loved, loved Ezekiel’s relationship with his dad. I loved the relationship his dad had with Ezekiel. It is a solid relationship, only made more so by the events of the book. It is a pleasure to read such a positive father-son relationship in YA fiction. While Lost and Found has a young tone to its storytelling, I would recommend this book to mature YA readers due to the reasons given behind the kidnapping, and while most details are spared, there is enough detail given and very serious themes raised that make this book more appropriate for older teen readers. The publishers provided an advanced readers copy of this book for reviewing purposes. All opinions are my own.

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Blackstone Publishing and NetGalley provided me with an electronic copy of Lost and Found. I was under no obligation to review this book and my opinion is freely given. 14 year old Ezekiel Bliss (Blast) has a talent for finding lost things, but his honesty in wanting to return them to their owners has inadvertently labeled him a thief. Ezekiel has the love of his father, but he is a pariah with regards to his classmates and teachers. When a girl from his neighborhood breaks down his barriers and they start a real friendship, will Ezekiel's solitary life gain more meaning? After a policeman asks him for help with a missing child, will Ezekiel discover that his gift has limitless potential? Lost and Found is a 3 star story, but the characters and the writing elevate it to a 4. Ezekiel is like any teenager looking to find their place in the world. The constant bullying and endless scrutiny has not broken Ezekiel; instead, his snarky comments and well practiced spiel give the young man an armor against the world. As Ezekiel finds more people who believe in him, the teenager gains a confidence and spark that is not seen earlier in the novel. This coming of age story has the science fiction aspects that I expected with this author, although it is definitely lighter than his usual fare. There were some parts of the plot that seemed to exist only to push the story along, but I really liked Lost and Found overall. Readers who like a little YA science fiction twisted with mystery may enjoy the novel for its great characterization and interesting voice.

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Lost and Found By Orson Scott Card I give this book 4 out of 5 birds. There were so many times I thought I LOVE THIS BOOK and then a few where it felt like it dragged or felt resolved too fast. The characters were mostly likable. I did like Ezekiel and especially his dad. I found Beth slightly annoying. I don’t want to give anything away but from the middle to the end I was like WAIT WHAT? WHY IS NO ONE ADDRESSING HOW ABSURED BETH IS. I mean Orson tried, but her life that she portrayed was so out there. This story focused on micro-powers. Ezekiels was returning things. I loved this concept. I have a micro power- I can remember where the most random item is when you lose it. When my husband is looking for his chapstick, instantly I’m like duh it’s on the sock on the floor on the left side under the bed….. The micro powers were fun and I liked reading about them. The plot was pretty good but also predictable. I”d say read it. It was worth it and entertaining, but maybe just check it out from the library. I also don’t know exactly what I would classify this book as… Definitely YA but it blurred the lines of contemporary, mystery, sci-fi???? Lost and Found drops on September 10, 2019. I received an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for my honest review. #amreading #mrsbirdswords #booklover #Bibliophile #bookaddict #bookreccomendation #goodreads #fiction #bookshelf #booksofinstagram #netgalley #yafiction #orsonscottcard #lostandfound #summerreading #dystopian #teenreading

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This is such a quirky and witty read !! I love Enders game and The Lost gate. I had high expectations! I adored the friendship between the main characters. Their banter and quick witted conversation kept the novel flowing quickly and made me laugh more than once. I also really enjoyed the idea of Ezekiel’s micro power. Seemed interesting enough. However the others powers just seemed a little ridiculous. By the end of the book I was so tired of reading the world micropower I was tempted to throw the book across the room. Over all cute YA read with some interring plot points (murder, kidnapping.... micropowers 🙄) but over all average execution. To be honest. I expected more from the author based on previous novels.

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4 stars because of subject matter I am nearly always a sucker for stories about teens with powers (except horror and zombies). I've also always liked Card's super smart kids. And all the snark is here, as oddball Ezekiel Blast (he tends to rename people, including himself) deals with the fallout of his micro power, which is to always know where lost things are. He finally makes a friend for the first time in his life. Beth is another really smart teen, hampered as she's a little person--at first glance she looks about eight years old. But she is determined, focused, and when she decides to make friends with prickly Ezekiel, she is going to prevail. It's she who inspires Ezekiel to stop ignoring his power (which is having emotional and even physical fallout) and help out a cop, who is trying to find a kidnapped child. Here's where I get ambivalent. There are certain subjects I try to avoid in my fiction reading, and the subject matter lying behind this missing child pretty much tops the list. Add to that that this book is slated for teens, and my ambivalence heightens. (Yes, I know teens are watching Game of Thrones etc. But I still would not have given this book to either of my teens, until they were college age.) That aside, the story was fast-paced, racing to a frenetic finish. I loved Ezekiel's relationships--with his dad, with Beth, with the crusty cop he ends up working with, despite initial antagonism. Except for that one aspect (and at least there is no excruciating detail) I found it an absorbing read, with some real gems of scenes, all of these being interactions between Ezekiel and the people he gets close to.

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"He never allowed any of the what-ifs to become a plan, because he knew that absolutely nothing was under his control." I was originally drawn to this book because of the cover, and then I realized the author is Orson Scott Card.  Ender's Game and Ender's Shadow are two of my most favorite books so I had to check out Lost and Found.  A middle grade read with less of a touch of science fiction than Card's other books,  this story was still a lot of fun.  Orson Scott Card is so versatile in his writing.  His books are always so engaging and absorbing no matter the intended audience.  I wouldn't rank this book up there with the Ender's series but it definitely warrants the read. I feel that this is a great place to start if you're looking for an introduction to this author, but not yet ready for the more science-fiction type books that's he's famous for.

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Lost and Found by Orrson Scott Card is a fun young adult novel about growing up, friendship and finding a way through isolation whatever the source. Orson Scott Card knows kids, especially gifted and isolated ones. You can see it in Enders Game and throughout his fiction and I was lucky enough to see it in person at a book signing when I was just a bit younger than the characters in this novel. They are a bit exaggerated as is often the case in YA, but they ring true and become more engaging as the story progresses. The story is technically about “micropowers” which are small superpowers and the protagonist uses his to find the owners of lost things. The important question is whether he also can use it to find lost people. The stakes are pretty high for young teenagers to deal with but their growth throughout the story is probably the most enjoyable part of the novel. Definitely worth checking out.

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4.25/5 ⭐️ Quite an enjoyable read! The characters are fun, the dialogue is silly and entertaining, and the storyline is intense! I had a blast (😉😉😅) reading this book. What is it about?: A teenage boy named Ezekiel has a micropower — a superpower that you may not always know you possess that does ordinary things, but can be used in useful ways. His micropower? Finding lost items and knowing where they belong and who they belong to. When he was younger, everyone thought he was a thief and he ran into trouble and was basically shunned, which caused him to neglect his micropower. However, he meets Beth, a fourteen year old girl who is the height of a six year old, and despite his attempts to push her away, she joins his shunning bubble and pushes him to learn more about his micropower. The base of this story is very strange and unique, but I found it highly enjoyable and exciting to read. It was definitely an adventure, and I never found myself bored at any point. Thank you to Netgalley and the publishers for allowing me to read the ARC in exchange for an honest review!! ❤️

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Title: Lost and Found Author: Orson Scott Card Publisher: Blackstone Publishing Release Date: September 10, 2019 Genre: Young Adult, Middle Grade, Sci-Fi Rating: 4 Stars Ezekiel Blast has a talent for finding things, this ability has led people to believe he's a thief. But he isn't. He has a power, a Micro-power, opposite of superpower because what good is it finding scrunchies or toys no one remembers. Or if they do, well the accuse you of stealing it in the first place. If only he could use it to the benefit of the greater good. Beth, a girl he befriends when he thought he needed no friends, seems to think he can use it for better. After the disappearance of a little girl, is brought to his attention for help, it's up to him to find is his talent can be a super-power. This story was great. Orson Scott Card knows how to write a good Sci-Fi, that keeps you at the edge of your seat. Ezekiel and Beth have such a sweet relationship even though they haven't known each other long. They start a friendship which seems at first only starts for mutual protection. As the story unfolds they become closer and tell each other about their pasts. Well mostly, Beth is very secretive. Beth is smart and funny, small for her age, and calls Ezekiel out when he needs it. Ezekiel is smart, cocky, has a micro-power and sometimes an ass. They help each other and realize they need each other very much. This was no Ender's Game. It proves that the Science Fiction genre has many faces, it doesn't have to be grand battles or space. Just a boy with power, he discovers, and a friend to help make sense of the world when you need it most. Disclaimer: I received this copy from the publisher via Netgalley, in exchange for an honest review

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Orson Scott Card shares with us the story of Ezekiel 'Blast' (Bliss). A talented boy, he is ostracized from his peers and has faced persecution from the police in the past because of his unique gift. During Grade 9, his life begins to change as he makes a friend and is approached by a detective desperately seeking a missing child. But Ezekiel doesn't find missing people - he recognizes missing things and knows who and where their owner is. Ezekiel's hunt to find his calling and the true extent of his 'micropower' is an enjoyable and identifiable journey for all middle school/upper high school students. Despite the extent to which his involvement would be allowed in 'the real world' being incredibly unrealistic, for everyone, Ezekiel is an entertaining - if somewhat snarky - young man and the relationship between him and his father is delightful. Ezekiel truly comes of age as he finds out what is important to him and where his talents lie. A fun adventure with a highly entertaining protagonist.

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Although with flaws (such as predictability and too-easy problem resolutions) the plot is solid overall. Card has obvious talent and it saves the book at times. I"m a bit old for this book, but it still has broad appeal. Recommended. I really appreciate the ARC for review!!

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Lost and Found by Orson Scott Card, 288 pages. Blackstone Publishing, 2019. $18.99 Language: R (55 swears, 0 “f”); Mature Content: PG13; Violence: PG13 BUYING ADVISORY: HS – ADVISABLE AUDIENCE APPEAL: HIGH Ezekiel hasn’t had a friend since he was six because of his criminal background, but then a pesky girl starts joining him on the walk to school. This girl, Beth, won’t leave Ezekiel alone, and she won’t stop talking. But maybe this pesky girl is the catalyst for change—change for Ezekiel and their community, whether they want it or not. Card is a wonderful author, and I was pleasantly surprised that I became as engrossed with this story as I have with his other ones (because this one seemed closer to home). The idea of “micropowers” elicited a lot of personal thought as I read, I loved that the mysteries solved were possible for me to solve alongside Ezekiel, and my favorite aspect is Ezekiel’s constant, clever quips. From the engaging first page to the resolutions of the last page, I couldn’t resist the desire to read just one more chapter. The mature content rating is for sexual jokes and mentions of child pornography; the violence rating is for death gore and mentions of rape. Reviewer: Carolina Herdegen

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I really enjoyed this book. I thought the writing was incredibly sharp, the dialogue entertaining, and the characters likable. I particularly liked that Ezekiel’s father completely supported him in spite of (and potentially because of) his intelligence and bluntness. So often I read about characters that are young and genius who are paired with parents that completely dismiss and belittle them. That wasn’t the case here and it made the story so much more interesting. I also thought it was a compelling and unique tale of police work, if slightly unrealistic - but this is science fiction! All in all, I really recommend this book. Ezekiel and Beth are wonderful characters and I found myself laughing multiple times throughout this book.

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Since Ezekiel can remember, he's had this unique trait that allows him to find the owner of lost things. Because this has led him to be questioned by police and counselors, he's avoided returning lost items for years. But when a police officer asks him to help find a lost girl, Ezekiel decides to test his micropower. This book is definitely worth a read. Such an original idea with a beautiful story of finding friendship in unlikely places. The characters are funny and original, and although it is science fiction,it feels realistic. Highly engaging young adult read.

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Orson Scott Card is, of course, most famous for Ender's Game and its sequels. His newest book, Lost and Found, has the same target audience, and features some of the same type of precious teens with unusual talents, but that's about as far as the comparisons go. In Lost and Found we meet teens who have micropowers. These are like superpowers, only less useful or significant. (For example, the ability to make people yawn, or to tell whether someone's belly button is an innie or outie.) The main character Ezekiel can see something that's lost and intuitively know whose it is and where to find that person. This got him into trouble when he was younger, because no one believed him when he said he just knew where things came from; they assumed he stole them. So he suppressed his power. Nevertheless, all the kids shunned him, labelling him a thief. Then several things happened: a detective read Ezekiel's file and tried to enlist him to find a missing girl. Beth, a classmate with proportional dwarfism, started walking to school with him, forcing her friendship on him against his initial rebuffs. And the school counselor encouraged him to go to a group called GRUT, Group of Rare and Useless Talents. This is where Ezekiel and other teens with micropowers meet with researchers who help them develop their talents. As he learns more about his micropower, Ezekiel decides to work with the detective. As it turns out, the detective is with the FBI, investigating a significant child trafficking ring. When Beth goes missing, Ezekiel is, of course, eager to do what he can to find her. Card's writing is a lot of fun. He deals with serious questions about things typical teens struggle with, serious questions about the complexities and implications of micropowers, and, as you might expect, mixes in plenty of good humor and fun. I really enjoyed the banter between Ezekiel and Beth, as well as their mild smart-alecky attitude against authority figures. I also enjoyed Ezekiel's relationship with his father. Ezekiel's mother was hit by a car and killed when Ezekiel was very young, so his dad has had to be a solo parent. It's nice to see a parent portrayed as wise and helpful, not a buffoon. On the question of micropowers, the FBI agent who recruited Ezekiel wonders if everybody has one, "only we thing the stuff we're doing just happens by chance." On the surface, Lost and Found is an entertaining adventure story with some silly premises and plot twists. But Card raises some good questions about using our gifts, whatever they are, about accepting people who are different, and about faithfulness to friends and family. Lost and Found is not your typical superhero origin story, and it's very different from Ender's Game, but should have a broad appeal for readers of all ages. Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for the complimentary electronic review copy!

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From best-selling author Orson Scott Card comes Lost and Found, a touching and quirky novel. This story was a quick page turner about bizarre "supernatural" abilities, missing people, and it handles some real issues facing teenagers and families. So back to those "supernatural" abilities. This book calls them "micropowers" as the abilities are too odd and useless to be deemed "superpowers". Ezekiel Blast has such a power. His micropower means he finds lost things and will always know who they belong to and how to return them to their owners. However, finding lost hair ties and scrunchies leaves him looking a bit odd, and at worse, finding missing bikes and toys leaves him looking like a thief. He has earned a bit of a reputation at school and finds himself alone and distrusting of adults. One day, he meets another outcast named Beth, who insists on walking to school with him. It appears he has met his match, and he cannot shake her. She talks and talks and probes him with questions. The two of them try to look at his micropower and dismantle and analyse it to see just how it works, whilst wondering if Beth has one of her own. When Beth goes off the radar, Ezekiel is faced with the challenge - is she missing, lost, or something else? Can he find her? On the surface, and when first starting the book, it seems hard to get connected with moody teenager Ezekiel, as he is a loner with an attitude, and can be quite sharp with his words. However, what unfolds is a novel which looks at anxiety, loss, bereavement, and friendship. It is handled with gentle humour, but with raw honesty too. The thing that was different about Lost and Found than other stories with "powers" in, is that the first part of the book is where the micropower is discussed at length and tested and evaluated by the characters. The readers are finding out about how this all works along with them. The reader will also come across a character that can make people yawn, as well as a someone who knows whether a person has an innie or outie bellybutton - useless micropowers right? After this, comes a mystery type story with a few shocks and turns. It was my first time reading something by this author and I was surprised by this book. It starts off as something sweet, but soon turns sinister and parts were quite sad, but there was always some form of wit, humour, or hope to keep things from becoming too dark. At first, I thought the story would be good for younger teens, but after finishing it, I would say it is more in the young adult genre due to some of the subject matter (child abduction, trafficking, and death). I didn't think I would like at first, but there were parts that got me right in the feels. You'll find lots of dialogue in this book, including plenty of back and forth banter between Ezekiel and Beth. There are sniping and playground insults, it seems like they always have to have the last word. Ezekiel argues with everyone and I think he uses his sass as a defense mechanism. Some of it seems childish, but you have to remember that Ezekiel and Beth are young teens. I sometimes felt there was too much banter and meandering conversations, and readers may feel parts of the story are about to go off tangent, but it goes with the style of the book, and to be honest, it made a change for me to read something like this and not lots of prose. I don't think this style will be to every reader's taste, but it does ease up halfway through. A special mention must go to Mr Blast, Ezekiel's father, as it is good to see a parent taking a positive and supporting role in a YA novel. He's a real hero and I really liked the tender scenes between father and son. I would recommend this to all YA fans, plus anyone who is going through a hard time at the moment, feeling lonely or lost, or missing someone, or who just wants to read a book and escape for a while and go through a whole range of emotions. Read this and come back and tell me...What's your micropower?

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Loved the book! I would like to thank the publisher for giving me a copy of this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

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This is such a well written book that I just loved! Lost and Found by Orson Scott Card is about a young man who is struggling to conquer the beast that is freshman year of high school. This time in life is hard for everyone but even harder for Ezekiel who has the "micropower" of finding lost things and knowing who they belong to. At first this may sound like an awesome ability but Ezekiel quickly learns that this isn't the case. After being blamed for various crimes he didn't commit, he decides to avoid his power at all costs. That is until Beth walks in to his life. Now his life is turned upside down! Not only did I get the pleasure of reading this fantastic book but I actually got to go to a book talk with Card this weekend. It was an amazing experience that I won't soon forget. I was so excited to read this book after the talk that I finished it in two days. Great read!

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I don’t even know where to start with this one… this book crept up on me and will probably stick with me for the rest of my life. There is such intense emotions at play here that it caught me off guard. Lost And Found is phenomenal. It all starts with the unlikely friendship of Ezekiel and Beth, and I think a quote from Ezekiel best sums it up. He says, Beth Sorenson, I’m the thief you chose to walk to school with. And you’re the proportionate dwarf that I choose to walk to school with. Ezekiel is 14 and has what they call in the book a “micropower”. Ezekiel has the unique ability to be able to return lost items to their owners. This has gotten him in a lot of trouble in the past because people tend to think he has stolen the object he is returning. Ezekiel is kind of forced into this friendship with Beth, who as previously mentioned is a proportionate dwarf, because she knows that if she stands within his “shunning bubble” and walks with him to “Downy Soft” High School no one will be able to pick on her. Beth helps Ezekiel to expand his “micropower” by helping him discover what he is capable of. Through his discoveries about his power he embarks on a journey to find a missing little girl and uncover a human trafficking ring with the help of a slightly overbearing detective named Shank. I’ll be honest this book took me a while and it really won me over when Ezekiel made a reference to The Lord of The Rings. Silly, I know. But this movie is about far more than a kid with a silly power, it about loss and growth. Ezekiel loses his mother when he is a young boy. He watches her get hit by a car and she dies in the hospital. Ezekiel is kind of a jerk because of a lot of deeply ingrained hurt. From his trouble with the cops to his sadness about his mother he is a hurt 14 year old boy. His father describes his hurt like this, Your body showed no injury that the doctors could treat, but I knew it was there, I knew that it shattered you, you were maimed, you were crippled that day, and there was nothing I could do, I couldn’t replace her, I couldn’t change my whole character and become that vibrant, happy, loving, chattering, kind and generous person in whose circle of light you had spent your entire life. So through this hurt we understand why Ezekiel is the way he is. But he does not stay his guarded smart ass self all through the novel. The character grows in a way that made me, as a reader, really fond of him. He starts off as almost an anti-hero and by the end he is a no strings attached hero through and through. Card wrote Ezekiel masterfully. On top of the meaningfulness of the characters there is a great sense of humor. The characters are witty and smart. Sometimes they come off as a little over the top smart but I think it works because you are supposed to realize that Ezekiel and Beth aren’t normal kids. They are special. My favorite quote from Beth is this, I don’t make up words,” said Beth. “I coin them when I need them, and then they’re real. Each character has their quirks. Ezekiel is kind of a jerk but really a softie on the inside, and Beth is a quick witted girl who always knows the right thing to say. The one thing about this story that was a little irritating to me was the dad, and I think it had more to do with the way his personality was written than anything. He is an extremely intelligent man but is ridiculously baffled by a smart phone. I understand that this is to illustrate that he isn’t very wealthy and that he is old-school, but this man has to be in his forties and literally has zero knowledge about electronics. It’s unbelievable and it proves to be an obstacle in a tense situation. I guess my point is that I grew up in a town with a lot of poverty and 99% of 40 year olds that I know can operate a smart phone. The writing wasn’t convincing. Plus the dad also has this to say about Ezekiel trick or treating, “Totally your call,” said Dad. “Till you’re sixteen, and then it’s just disgusting to go begging for candy. I don’t know I guess that idea rubbed me the wrong way because I’d rather a 16 year old be out trick or treating than causing trouble. But with problematic dads aside this book is about coping and there is an analogy that Beth uses that perfectly sums up grief and the grieving process. It really hit me in the heart and gave me a deeper understanding of he underlying issues. She says, Look, Ezekiel Blast, the past is like gum stuck to the bottom of your shoe. When bad stuff first happens, it’s like when the gum is sticking to everything—the road, the sidewalk. And you can’t wear that shoe into the house because it will get all involved in the carpet and the bathroom rug, but when you try to scrape it off on the edge of the sidewalk or the edge of the porch, or you try to rub it off in the grass, it won’t come off. So you have to just live with it. You walk along, your foot trying to stick with every step, but gradually as the gum gets dirtier and dries out more and more, it loses its stickiness. And eventually, without ever actually removing it, you forget the gum is there. Except maybe on a hot day the gum gets soft and a little sticky again, and you think, Oh, yeah, gum on my shoe. I thought this was so beautifully worded and it is so easy to digest. Everyone knows what it is like to have gum stuck to the bottom of their shoes. Everyone knows what hurt feels like and for Orson Scott Card to put it together so nicely really impressed me. This book also has a lot to say about people as individuals. The insinuation can be made that everyone has some kind of “micropower”, I won’t spoil some of the others for you because I think they add to the story. I felt Orson Scott Card was saying that everyone is special, everyone is unique, and everyone is useful in their own way. The message is beautiful and Ezekiel’s power proves to be way bigger and way more useful than he could ever imagine. Even the “dumbest” of powers prove to be valuable in the right situation. I’m going to use one more quote from Beth, she says to Ezekiel, You said no person is ever really lost because you always know how to find yourself, because you’re always right there. I think this rings true for more than just Ezekiel’s power. If you ever feel lost remember that you aren’t because you know where you are and that is where you are supposed to be at the time. Ezekiel can only find lost things, but a person is never really lost just in a different space than where they wish to be. It felt good to read those words and apply them to my life, and I believe that is what Orson Scott Card intended. It was hard for me to rate this one because for a long time I didn’t know what to say. Now that it is all written down and I see how many quotes I pulled from the text I think it would be dishonest to give it anything less than 5 stars. So 5/5, this book was a real treat and a surprise. Thank you to NetGalley and Blackstone Publishing for allowing me access to this title.

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This book had such a solid and different premise~ About a boy with superpower of finding things. But I felt the execution was subpar even though it had some really great moments the overall message or I think what the author was going for failed. It clearly has a lot of potential and it’s still. A great read would recommend it most of the people starting with YA fantasy ❤️

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Ezekiel isn't a superhero, but he does have this ability--it usually gets him in trouble, and makes him seem odd, so he tries to keep it to himself. It's just a micro-power, seemingly insignificant. He can find things, little things like toys or hair scrunchies; things that are lost. And he returns them. But how do you explain something you don't understand yourself? People think he's a thief, or a stalker. Then a girl goes missing. Can Ezekiel's micro-power find a person that is lost? Detective Shank thinks so. I was a little unsure about how this scenario would be set up and played out. No, Ezekiel is NOT a psychic; he does NOT seek supernatural/demonic revelations to guide him. This would not be something I would read or promote to other readers. Like a superhero, Ezekiel is just a fourteen year old boy who has a power that sets him apart, and may save the world...his world, at least. I have only ever read Ender's Game by this author before taking up this book. I didn't make it all the way through that one. But this one was better--it does drag for a bit at the beginning, but there is also an engaging banter, wit, and sarcasm as well as eye-opening wisdom and bold insight that draws you in. Ezekiel is being raised by his father after his mother's tragic death. I love seeing this father/son relationship, and how they are trying to navigate their way through unending grief and loss, and live their lives the best way they can. Ezekiel's friend, Beth, is spunky and somewhat strange, but very likable, as is Ezekiel. There is some mild language. And I would not consider this a read for young or sensitive readers. Triggers would include: the dark world of child-kidnapping as well as murder (more talked about than seen). Other than this, and some mildly mature discussions about a person's anatomy, this was an intriguing and fascinating read, and I really enjoyed it. I received an ARC copy from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.

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Wow! What great characters!! I remember thinking how great the characters were every other page I read. Although this story is not for me, I would 110% recommend this to younger readers or for those looking for something refreshing.

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