Nubia: Real One

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Pub Date 23 Feb 2021 | Archive Date 23 Feb 2021

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Description

Can you be a hero...if society doesn't see you as a person?

Nubia has always been a little bit...different. As a baby she showcased Amazonian-like strength by pushing over a tree to rescue her neighbor's cat. But despite her having similar abilities, the world has no problem telling her that she's no Wonder Woman. And even if she were, they wouldn't want her. Every time she comes to the rescue, she's reminded of how people see her: as a threat. Her moms do their best to keep her safe, but Nubia can't deny the fire within her, even if she's a little awkward about it sometimes. Even if it means people assume the worst.

When Nubia's best friend, Quisha, is threatened by a boy who thinks he owns the town, Nubia will risk it all--her safety, her home, and her crush on that cute kid in English class--to become the hero society tells her she isn't.

From the witty and powerful voice behind A Blade So Black, and with endearing and expressive art by Robyn Smith, comes a vital story for today about equality, identity, and kicking it with your squad.
Can you be a hero...if society doesn't see you as a person?

Nubia has always been a little bit...different. As a baby she showcased Amazonian-like strength by pushing over a tree to rescue her...

Available Editions

EDITION Other Format
ISBN 9781401296407
PRICE $16.99 (USD)

Average rating from 36 members


Featured Reviews

Content warning: racism, police brutality/discrimination, attempted sexual assault, school shooting

I absolutely loved Nubia as a character. She was strong in more ways than just her superpowers. I think her fight to become a good citizen/friend/person is something that could resonate with a lot of readers. With so many of the topics described in this comic book the are on the news these days, this story could be a good starting point on how young (and older) readers can stand up and fight for causes black Americans have been fighting for so long. In addition to Nubia, I also adored her moms. You could feel their love for Nubia just power through the words and art. They gave great advice to Nubia that a lot of people can use in their own lives, not just secret superheroes. Nubia's friends and love interest were also a joy.

I loved the use of pink and purple palettes throughout the book. It showed LL McKiney and Robyn Smith weren't afraid of having a female superhero as their protagonist. I also enjoyed seeing how much diversity there was in the comic book. There wasn't just racial diversity, but also lots of different types of body types and skin tones. I felt like both KcKiney and Smith wanted to showcase all the ways that people can be different but also be part of the comic book genre. I also enjoyed the small details that truly tied this story together like the matching PJs of the moms and the incredible outfits everyone wore (shout out to Quisha and Oscar;s outfits).

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