Allison's Gambit

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Pub Date 12 Oct 2021 | Archive Date 31 Oct 2021

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Description

When Allison began to care for her mother with Alzheimer’s, she started to ask some difficult questions. At what point is a life no longer worth living? Would dementia be in her future too?

Worried that her mother’s fate may be her own, Allison comes up with an unusual approach to try and control her own demise: start smoking. After all, she would rather die of cancer or a lung infection than the way her mother did—unable to recognize her own family, to take care of herself, or even speak. The tough part will be getting her family and friends on board with her new perspective.

Full of compassion for both Alzheimer’s victims and those it affects—caregivers, family, and loved ones—Allison’s Gambit brings a taboo topic to the forefront and asks us all—what would we do?


When Allison began to care for her mother with Alzheimer’s, she started to ask some difficult questions. At what point is a life no longer worth living? Would dementia be in her future too?

Worried...


A Note From the Publisher

C.A. Price is a family practice physician in California. The philosophy of Allison’s Gambit was inspired by patients of his who have been caregivers to those with dementia and his continued observation that these family members often end up with tremendous guilt. His work with hospice has taught him that those who change their views about dying seem to live so much better. It is his first novel.

C.A. Price is a family practice physician in California. The philosophy of Allison’s Gambit was inspired by patients of his who have been caregivers to those with dementia and his continued...


Available Editions

ISBN 9781953639103
PRICE $16.95 (USD)

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Average rating from 6 members


Featured Reviews

This book calls on the reader to wrestle with fundamental questions of death, how we might want to die, and how an individual's dying can affect those around them. It offers an honest examination of the challenges faced by a caregiver whose parent is suffering from advanced Alzheimer's as well as the repercussions caretaking for a person with dementia has on her family and personal relationships. Anyone who has lived through this incredibly difficult experience will find the stark honesty of the book refreshing. Anyone who has not yet lived through this caregiving experience may discover helpful perspectives and ideas for how best to manage what is undoubtedly one of life's most difficult situations. While some fiction offer readers a beautiful, well-told story, few such books inform the reader about life-and-death issues or have the capacity to really impact critical life (and death) decisions. Allison's Gambit is one such book, ambitiously tackling a subject that verges on modern taboo.

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I wasn’t sure what to expect from this book from reading the blurb but it was absolutely a great book. The main character is an anxious person who seen the worst happen to a parent and decides that she wants to control her destiny. The results are heartbreaking and hilarious.

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I enjoyed this. I do feel it started a bit slow. It took a bit to really get in to it. It seemed to jump around a bit. It made me think a lot about death and the caregivers around us. The idea was whether you would want to die a slow death with people having to care for you, or if there was a way to decide to die a quick/peaceful death. Overall I really felt for the main character and what she went through as a caregiver. Thank you Netgalley and circuit breaker books for the chance to read this book.

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Overall, the story was quite good and did investigate some interesting topics. Unfortunately the pacing was extremely slow which took away from the enjoyment a lot, with some of the detail feeling unnecessary.

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