Powwow Day

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Pub Date 08 Feb 2022 | Archive Date 08 Feb 2022

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Description

In this uplifting, contemporary Native American story, River is recovering from illness and can't dance at the powwow this year. Will she ever dance again?

River wants so badly to dance at powwow day as she does every year. In this uplifting and contemporary picture book perfect for beginning readers, follow River's journey from feeling isolated after an illness to learning the healing power of community.

Additional information explains the history and functions of powwows, which are commonplace across the United States and Canada and are open to both Native Americans and non-Native visitors. Author Traci Sorell is a member of the Cherokee Nation, and illustrator Madelyn Goodnight is a member of the Chickasaw Nation.
In this uplifting, contemporary Native American story, River is recovering from illness and can't dance at the powwow this year. Will she ever dance again?

River wants so badly to dance at powwow day...

Available Editions

EDITION Other Format
ISBN 9781580899482
PRICE $16.99 (USD)

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Average rating from 23 members


Featured Reviews

Powwow Day is about a little girl recovering from an illness who attends a powwow but can't participate. We learn about traditions and the illustrations are beautiful. She eventually begins enjoying the powwow and embracing her community's support. The book also includes information about Native American traditions. Thank you NetGalley and the publisher for providing this ARC.

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In this beautifully illustrated picture book, a young Native American girl named River and her family attend a powwow. River wants to dance in her jingle dress at the event, as she does every year, but she is overcoming an illness and isn’t well enough yet. In the beginning, she is very sad but once the dancing begins and she embraces the fact that their dancing is also for her healing, she begins to enjoy the day. This book would be a great addition to any elementary classroom or child's personal library. There is also information at the end of the book on the history of powwows. #PowwowDay #NetGalley #TraciSorell #nativeamericantraditions #picturebookreview #indigenouspicturebooks #indigenouschildrensbooks #diversepicturebooks #indigenousculture #childrenslibrary #classroomlibrary Thank you NetGalley and Charlesbridge Publishing for the ARC.

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River, a young girl, makes the trip to the annual powwow, but is sick and can't dance. She repeatedly wants to get up and dance but keeps sitting to watch. The story shares a message of the importance of community, healing, and ritual in Indigenous life. The book is beautifully illustrated and uses a lot of sounds to make you feel that you're at the powwow. What a gorgeous book!

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If you are looking for a perfect book for indigenous people's day or perhaps a shorter read aloud for 4th grade US history you have found the book. I have enjoyed the beautiful work of Traci Sorell for two school years now and have worked her book Otsaliheliga into my curriculum on indigenous people for two years now. I am excited to have a new book that weaves a more personal tale of a young girl and an essential ceremony for her tribe. I felt a part of the action as she used descriptive language to illustrate the thrumming of the drums and the ways in which the music and dance communicated messages to the tribe. Additionally I really appreciate the notes on Powwows at the end they provide a helpful starting point for planning lessons to education children on cultures and rituals of indigenous people.

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This book is delightful from the moment you pick it up to the moment you tuck it back onto it's shelf. The illustrations are vivid and vibrant, capturing the beauty of Native American culture. It would be the perfect addition to a classroom bookshelf to share information about powwows and Native American life with students, especially around Indigenous Peoples Day or during units of study about Native Americans. It is a doorway into the world of Native American culture that so many children never get to learn about or develop an appreciation for. The main character River is taken to the powwow with her family. She has recently been ill, her hair is cut shorter than the other members of her family. It is never explicitly said why she was sick or what she was sick with, which I appreciated because children struggling with any disease or illness can connect to her character and see themselves in her character. The story touches on her disappointment and how things don't always go the way we want them to. River wants to dance, but isn't able to. I also loved the theme of healing and how River understands that her sister is dancing for her. There is an informational page at the end explaining some of the terms and history of the powwow and its dances. A wonderful book that all children should have an opportunity to read.

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This picture book was a wonderful introduction to powwows, in a well-written, well-illustrated way. The storyline of the girl who is unable to dance in the powwow is moving. This one is definitely a book to recommend to parents and children.

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This is a educational and informative book. It brings indigenous culture to life for non-indigenous people. Children and adults need to learn more about different cultures and traditions and this is a great way to try and do that . The illustrations are superb and add a wonderful visual to the story.

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Oh I really liked this one. I thought it was very important to introduce the process of recovery from an illness or injury to kids, I really liked the message and the information on powwows at the end. The illustrations were great too.

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River has been sick, and she has recovered, but not enough to do dancing at the powwow. But she is well enough to go, and so we see the powwow through her eyes, as she describes all she sees, and misses. Lovely picture book that shows the march and the jingle dresses, and the other dancers, and how they honor River, because of her illness. And the end of the book goes into the history of the jingle dress, as well as modern day powows. Excellent book to have in any library. <em> Thanks to Netgalley for making this book available for an honest review. </em>

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Colorful illustrations and short text build this story well for the reader. Inferences need to be made as to why the young girl can’t dance, but it is clear the tradition is strong. Supplementary text is excellent in explaining aspects of the PowWow itself. I’d like to see more like this, in particular if pictures of a real PowWow rather than cartoons were included. The colorful cartoons are engaging, but do not portray that this is a story taking place in present day, not long ago.

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River is woken up on Powwow Day, a day for celebrating her people and culture, with an impending sense of disappointment. Because of her recent unnamed illness ,she is unable to participate in the special dances she loves. We witness the Powwow through River's eyes as she appreciates the beauty of the prayers, drumming and dancing all whilst fighting off feelings of fatigue and gloominess. When her friends dance the healing dance, River's sense of determination and hopefulness return to her. This book is beautifully illustrated with an inviting color pallet that will make it a popular choice for young readers. The author provides detailed explanation of the Powwow ceremony at the end of the book, making it an excellent addition to school libraries and classrooms.

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It's powwow day, a day River usually loves, but she is sick this year and not able to dance as she wants. As River watches her community and family dance for her and healing, she feels comforted knowing she will dance again. This lovely story is a great introduction to modern indigenous culture and traditions, and a good read for preschool and early elementary. Illustrations by Madelyn Goodnight beautifully capture the story by Traci Sorell.

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I read this book in one sitting with my daughter and she loved the illustrations. The book is really colourful and bright and the images really did capture her attention. As a mum I thought that it had a good underlying theme and a great introduction to a different culture too. I am teaching my daughter about differences, respecting others and different beliefs so this tied in nicely to that. It is 4 stars from me for this one – highly recommended!

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This book is absolutely excellent, and I can't wait to order a bunch for my store and read it to all the little ones in my life. Focused on a little girl who hasn't yet fully recovered from an unnamed illness (probably cancer, judging from brief comments about her hair still being short), it's about a family's trip to an annual powwow and how the girl is frustrated about not being able to dance yet. But it's more about the girl finding hope and peace in her community and knowing that "next year', she will be able to dance. It's also got some beautiful art and some great 'teaching by showing' moments about some Indigenous Nations' dance traditions (including a very brief appendix in the back).

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Powwow Day by Traci Sorell follows River as she returns to the powwow grounds after being ill. She isn’t yet well enough to dance again, and she sorely misses participating in the traditions she loves. River’s story is beautifully told with simple flowing language that makes her narrative easy to follow for little ones while still being full of meaning. The explanation of traditions including the drums, jingle dress, grand entry, grass dancers, and more are wonderful educational tools that don’t disrupt River’s narrative. The importance of these traditions translates clearly, and the reader sees the impact of both participating and observing inter-tribal powwows. The overall tone and voice is hopeful while also acknowledging the hardship of not being able to participate in something you love because you are still recovering from illness. River’s story will be relatable for readers of all ages. River’s yearning to get back to normal life is thwarted when she doesn’t have the energy to stand, and when she can no longer feel the drum’s heartbeat rising through her feet. River’s story is sure to encourage empathy, while the people around her who help her throughout her story stand out and are sure to inspire readers to look for ways to help others. The illustrations perfectly match the tone and voice of the narrative. Chickasaw Nation citizen Madelyn Goodnight captures River’s emotions and the powwow setting in her gorgeous illustrations, fully encompassing the vivid experience of attending a powwow. Each page is full of gorgeous illustrations, capturing the beauty of individuality and community simultaneously. Traci Sorell is one of my favorite authors and a fellow Cherokee Nation citizen. I am in awe of the work she is doing to have more indigenous representation. Each of her books is absolutely excellent. While you wait for Powwow Day to release on February 8, 2022, I highly recommend her other books. I’m fully obsessed with We are Grateful Otsaliheliga, At the Mountain’s Base, and We Are Still Here. Sorell consistently creates Native stories with a strong narrative while also teaching about Native experiences, whether it is in her nonfiction book (We Are Still Here) or by weaving facts into her fictional books (At the Mountain’s Base discusses female Native service members, We are Grateful Otsaliheliga on modern Native experiences). These picture books are great to read aloud and teach kids and their grownups that Native Americans are not a part of the past, but are real living people. Powwow Day will be available February 8, 2022 from Charlesbridge. Thank you to Ms. Sorell, NetGalley, and Charlesbridge for an advanced copy of the book so I could share my honest opinions.

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This was such a great book for kids. My daughter loved this one, and I enjoyed it as well. It’s always great to teach kids about other cultures, and I would love more books like this.

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A touching book about a little girl dealing with illness and a beautiful exploration of celebrations by the Ponca and Omaha tribes. I loved the gorgeous illustrations and information in the back!

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I got an ARC of this book. I am not Indigenous. My Chickasaw is better than my French, but just barely. So I really can’t express just how incredible it is to see Indigenous faces and culture in a picture book. It is something that I am incredibly excited about, because I like picture books, but imagine an Indigenous kid actually being able to see themself in a book. That is what is more important than what I think about this book. That being said, here is my opinion of this book: I really liked it, but the art is what made me excited. I was talking to my Chickasaw partner about this book last night. They said that the art was wonderful, because the faces are not just tinted white faces, that they had Indigenous features. That isn’t something I noticed, but I feel like it is more important than anything I noticed. I noticed the colors, I noticed the outfits, I noticed the hair. I noticed things that just felt exciting. Everything felt alive and exciting. I don’t know a great deal about powwows, so the last few pages that explain the different words and the important of the celebration was really appreciated and meant that this could be used to teach kids that aren’t growing up with these celebrations. I am going to recommend books by name that you should also read if you are looking at this one. There are other Indigenous picture books out there that seem to be a “if you know you know” situation. 47,000 Beads Ho’onani: Hula Warrior Little Loksi C is for Chickasaw Chikasha Stories (there are multiple volumes, this is the first one) There are more out there. These are just the ones I have learned about in the last year or so. Please keep looking, please keep talking about these books.

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Wow! Just wow! Knockout illustrations and the storytelling has a gentle touch. We know that our protagonist is ill, but the illness is never identified, though the back matter refers to Covid-19. The story conveys the power of community to heal. The back matter also explains how the powwow is one of the inclusive traditions, where outsiders are welcome.

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This beautifully illustrated book does a fantastic job of describing a tribe's culture, traditions, and spirituality as told through the eyes of a little girl whose health has prohibited her from dancing this year. The reader views the story as she does, from the audience. The traditions and meaning are described in easy to understand language, and the importance of learning from other cultures is celebrated in this book. I love that there are more books featuring youth who identify as a member of an indigenous culture. This book is a wonderful story that should be shared with all children and their families.

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After Traci Sorell’s “We Are Grateful” and “We Are Still Here”, I was looking forward to her upcoming picture book “Powwow Day”. This book is a great window for me to know more about ‘Powwow’, a sacred social gathering held by many North American indigenous communities. River, who is recovering from illness, would not be able to participate in the Powwow Day this year. A simple yet enriching story, it is a vibrant narrative about Powwow Day and the uplifting quality of community. It is important to read this book even in this part of the world, because when we hear stories about customs and traditions from the opposite end, we know that we are more alike than different.

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