How to Teach Grown-Ups About Pluto

The cutting-edge space science of the solar system

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Pub Date 24 May 2022 | Archive Date 30 May 2022
Publisher Spotlight, Britannica Books

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Description

A witty guide to Pluto’s discovery and demotion, which puts kids in charge.

Pluto has not been a planet since 2006. But this tiny world still inspires people of all ages while sparking controversy. In this delightfully witty book, astronomer Dean Regas teaches you how to educate your grown-up about the cutting-edge science of space, most crucially the reason why Pluto is NOT a planet anymore. Delving into the history of space discoveries, the key players who have helped our understanding of the universe (including the 11-year-old girl who named Pluto in the first place), and the ever-changing nature of science, this book will equip every reader with the tools they need to bring their grown-ups fully up to speed, and to sneak in as many amazing astronomical facts as possible. And there’s a handy quiz at the end so that you can check your grown-up has been paying attention!

A witty guide to Pluto’s discovery and demotion, which puts kids in charge.

Pluto has not been a planet since 2006. But this tiny world still inspires people of all ages while sparking controversy. In...


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ISBN 9781913750510
PRICE $14.99 (USD)

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Average rating from 9 members


Featured Reviews

A delightful book for kids to teach them (and adults) about Pluto! It goes through the history of the discovery of Pluto and then why Pluto was declassified from being a planet. It is super informative about a lot of space ideas too. I thought it did a great job of breaking down these more complex ideas for kids (and adults!). Plus all the illustrations were so cute!

I received my copy from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

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Oh my goodness! I need this book for every planet! My son and I both love space, and what a fun way to learn together and connect over a common interest!

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"Science is a living, breathing, changing adventure. That's what makes science so fun!"

The tongue in cheek premise is that kids are helping their grown-ups to let go of the need to argue about Pluto's demotion from planet to "dwarf planet". It gives a great overview of the discovery timeline of the objects in our solar system and why they fit into different categories.

I love this book because while it's a great middle grade science book with cute illustrations, it's also about information literacy. It's introducing kids (and maybe their grown-ups as well) to the idea that the scientific community changing its mind when it learns new information is a feature, not a bug.

It's fun and easy to understand, a great book for your curious kid that may also teach you a few things about scientific discovery and debate as well.

This book includes a bibliography, index, and glossary.

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This non-fiction book about planets and the history of astronomy is so much more than your average space book! Based on the premise that millennial (and older) parents are reluctant to confirm to the notion that Pluto is not actually a planet, this book prepares children with the information required to win an argument with their parents about why Pluto is not a planet. Through hilarious additional content, such as describing the 5 stages of grieve grown ups might go through, silly pictures, and interesting chapter themes, this book teaches a lot of really important information without feeling like a typical non-fiction or educational text. As a grade 3 teacher I can definitely see this book being a hit in my classroom. And as a millennial who grew up with nine planets I would recommend the section on the stages of grief to my peers (just kidding). This is a great book and I think kids in the 9-12 age range will love it. Thanks so much to Netgalley and the publisher for giving me the opportunity to read and review this great book!

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