Holmes Coming

You must sign in to see if this title is available for request.
Send NetGalley books directly to your Kindle or Kindle app

1
To read on a Kindle or Kindle app, please add kindle@netgalley.com as an approved email address to receive files in your Amazon account. Click here for step-by-step instructions.
2
Also find your Kindle email address within your Amazon account, and enter it here.
Pub Date 01 Nov 2022 | Archive Date Not set

Talking about this book? Use #HolmesComing #NetGalley. More hashtag tips!


Description

The genius reappears, but is the twenty-first century ready for him?

Dr. Amy Winslow tells the story: in foggy, nighttime San Francisco a jogging SFPD captain is savagely attacked by a Bengal tiger which then vanishes. In her ER, Amy labors unsuccessfully to save the captain’s life, then consoles his aggrieved closest friend, Lt. Luis Ortega. Neither suspects their lives will intertwine in a life-or-death mystery.


The next day, checking on former patient Mrs. Hudson at her Victorian house isolated in Marin County’s forest, Amy discovers in the cellar a secret, cobweb-covered 1899 electrochemical laboratory containing a Jules Verne–esque steam-punk sarcophagus out of which springs a wild-eyed, half-mummified, crypt-keeper-like man who injects himself with something before falling dead at her feet. Amy barely revives him.


He claims to be a real-life Victorian master chemist and detective named Holmes, who allowed Conan Doyle to write stories based on his cases, though was slightly annoyed when Doyle changed his real first name to the catchier Sherlock. Becoming uninspired by 1890s crime, Holmes devised this method to hibernate for a century to investigate future mysteries.


Amy assumes he’s a lunatic. His Scotland Yard identity papers were stolen while he slept, so it takes her a while to realize his amazing story is true.


Respectably handsome when cleaned up, Holmes is still the same brash, egoistic, uber-English, cocaine-addicted, non-feminist genius—but now a century out of sync—so his still-brilliant deductions are sometimes laughingly or dangerously wrong. Holmes and Amy, his reluctant new Watson, find themselves unexpectedly attracted to each other while perilously involved in reclaiming his proof of identity, aided by cybersavvy street teen Zapper. It’s all connected to the horrific death-by-tiger, only the first of several bizarre, mystifying murders being committed by an exquisitely fiendish descendant of Holmes’ Victorian archenemy, Professor Moriarty.


The tone is classic Holmes—plus a refreshing twist of fish-out-of-water humor with a surprising spark of real romance.

The genius reappears, but is the twenty-first century ready for him?

Dr. Amy Winslow tells the story: in foggy, nighttime San Francisco a jogging SFPD captain is savagely attacked by a Bengal tiger...


A Note From the Publisher

Kenneth Johnson is the bestselling author of numerous books including The Man of Legends and The Darwin Variant. He is a successful writer-producer-director of film and TV. Creator of the critically acclaimed landmark TV miniseries V, Kenneth also produced The Six Million Dollar Man and created the iconic Emmy-winning series The Bionic Woman, The Incredible Hulk, and Alien Nation. Recipient of multiple Saturn Awards from the Academy of Science Fiction, Kenneth lives with his wife, Susan, in Los Angeles. Visit him at www.KennethJohnson.us and www.Facebook.com/KennethJohnsonAuthor.

Kenneth Johnson is the bestselling author of numerous books including The Man of Legends and The Darwin Variant. He is a successful writer-producer-director of film and TV. Creator of the critically...


Marketing Plan

National and regional reviews and author interviews

Mystery-fiction buzz mailing

Digital and print advertising campaign

Social media campaign

Author website: KennethJohnson.us

National and regional reviews and author interviews

Mystery-fiction buzz mailing

Digital and print advertising campaign

Social media campaign

Author website: KennethJohnson.us


Available Editions

EDITION Hardcover
ISBN 9798200706884
PRICE $25.99 (USD)

Available on NetGalley

NetGalley Shelf App (PDF)
Send to Kindle (PDF)
Download (PDF)

Average rating from 8 members


Featured Reviews

I am a huge fan of Sherlock Holmes! I love reading the old stories, and I especially love seeing authors expand Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's work by writing the famous detective into new stories and new timelines. Kenneth Johnson's "Holmes Coming" does something with Sherlock I have never seen. Yes, I have read the books where Holmes is living in present day, and watched the TV shows like "Sherlock" and "Elementary." But what I haven't seen before, and thought was just so much fun, was having turn of the 20th century Sherlock Holmes in present day having to adapt to 21st century advances and catch up on all the crime he's missed for the last 100 years. I thought this was a smart twist and Johnson executes it splendidly.

"Holmes Coming" opens in the emergency room with Dr. Amy Winslow trying to save the life of an SFPD police captain, who has been brutally attacked by a Bengal tiger while out on his morning jog. Unable to save the captain. Amy gives her condolences to his close friend Lieutenant Ortega not realizing Ortega is going to become a part of her life in a big way. The next day Amy goes to visit an old friend Mrs. Hudson, who informs her that she unfortunately has to sell her house and wonders if Amy is interested in buying it. While exploring the house, Amy comes across a hidden cellar containing 1899 electrochemical lab equipment, and a chamber housing the body of a man who suddenly springs to life. This man claims to be the inspiration for the famous Victorian era detective, Sherlock Holmes. Feeling as though he has caught all the criminals and solved all the crimes that his era would provide, Holmes had put himself into a deep sleep for over a hundred years in hopes of waking up in a new era with new adversaries and crimes to solve. The first being, who stole his money and personal documents that he had hidden away within the secret cellar. While on the search for his belongings, Holmes begins to explore San Francisco and all the 21st century has to offer, while finding himself entangled in the tiger killing case and Lt. Ortega's disappearance, with a new Watson in Amy and perhaps a familiar foe.

I really enjoyed this book! It was an easy read, yet felt like it was filled with so much detail and plot. The characters were entertaining and engaging. I quite liked watching Sherlock learn the ways of the 21st century, and I literally laughed out loud reading him converse with his new Irregular, Zapper. Slang just isn't in Sherlock's repertoire just yet, and it was a hoot seeing him learn everything on the fly. It's refreshing to see Sherlock actually have to learn something, instead of already having knowledge of the subject. This novel really does have the spirit of Conan Doyle's original Holmes stories, but Johnson has done a great job of infusing his own voice and humor into the story. I am not sure if this is meant to be the beginning of the series, as I felt the end of the book did have a definite ending, but if Johnson does choose to make this a series, I would continue to read it.

I did have two little baby issues however. The first being, I wasn't a fan of some of the characters of color's dialogue. Not everyone who is younger and comes from rougher neighborhoods speaks improperly. I felt it was playing into a stereotype when it really didn't suit the characters, especially Zapper who is a genius with electronics and visits the library to check out books every day. Secondly, I really appreciated the gender flip on "Watson" by having Amy be a woman. But for crying out loud, does every male and female character who work closely together have to have some kind of sexual tension and feelings? Can they not just be platonic friends and colleagues?

Overall, I thought this was a fun, entertaining and engaging book. Fans of Sherlock Holmes will love it! Thank you Net Galley and Blackstone Publishing for giving me an advance copy.

Was this review helpful?

I must confess that I went into this book with a sense of trepidation. I'm a big Sherlock Holmes fan, having read the canon many times. Holmes traveling through time? It just sounded weird. But, after reading Holmes Coming, I have to say that it is among the best books I have read in the last year. And I read a lot of books.

Surprisingly, the scientific explanation as to how Holmes travels from the Victorian period to the present makes quite a bit of sense. Emotionally, it makes a lot of sense. The explanation of how Sherlock Holmes really existed in a complicated arrangement with the real Dr. Watson and a struggling writer, Arthur Conan Doyle, was probably the biggest stretch. But with a little suspension of belief, it worked.

Dr. Amy Winslow is a modern doctor in San Francisco. When she first witnesses the revival of someone claiming to be Sherlock Holmes, she doesn't believe it. Who would? But the blend of Holmes discovering all of the changes of the last century and Amy slowly coming to grips that he is who he says he is makes for an interesting read.

While the ending was a bit more of "The Streets of San Francisco" than The Hound of the Baskervilles, it was still a pleasant experience. The book set the stage for a series of enjoyable books. And a movie or two would would be a treat.

Was this review helpful?

I liked it very much. It's just a fun romp and exactly what I wanted it to be given it's stellar premise.

It's got plenty of plot to keep things moving on 3 different fronts, but the real star of the show, as it should be, is Sherlock.

This is a wonderful version of our favorite detective, full of all the acerbic humor and brilliant deductions we have come to expect.

And the lead female character, Amy, is a perfectly spunky foil to Mr. Holmes. She delights in not only showing him around 21st century America, but also around the new cultural mores of this world. A woman can be a doctor? An astronaut? A vice president? And for his part, Holmes adapts quickly and well, to these new gender roles and to all things technological, which delight him.

I also was delighted by the notion of Sherlock Holmes finding himself in San Francisco. We see him in London, of course, and in NYC in my favorite Holmes adaptation, Elementary. But he really finds his feet in San Francisco - it fits his personality so well - and I was so happy to spend some time with him in that eccentric, beautiful, foggy city.

I will say that there's no question that anyone who loves Holmes will enjoy this story. There is so much canon used to great effect there. But, if you have never dipped into Holmes, I fear 70% of the enjoyment would be lost, so for that reason, I want to be sure to issue that warning.

But, if you love all things Holmes, you are going to want to check out the unfortunately titled, but delightful Holmes Coming by Kenneth Johnson.

Was this review helpful?

A fun read with some humor along the way. It seems risky to create another Holmes story, particularly one set in modern times. But this worked quite well. Recommended.

I really appreciate the free ARC for review!!

Was this review helpful?

Readers who liked this book also liked: