The Narrow Window

A Novel

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Pub Date 01 Mar 2024 | Archive Date 12 Feb 2024

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Description

As the turbulent sixties draw to a close, an inexplicable crime forces two young Americans who are teaching in Africa, and those around them, to confront issues of motivation, culture and belonging.

As the turbulent sixties draw to a close, an inexplicable crime forces two young Americans who are teaching in Africa, and those around them, to confront issues of motivation, culture and belonging.


A Note From the Publisher

Gary D. Wilson is the author of the novels Sing, Ronnie Blue and Getting Right, in addition to the story collection For Those Who Favor Fire. He holds an MFA in fiction writing from Bowling Green State University in Ohio and taught fiction writing and literature at Johns Hopkins University before moving to Chicago, where he taught fiction writing at the University of Chicago Graham School. He has published widely in literary magazines across the country, including Glimmer Train, Quarterly West, Witness, In Posse Review, and the William and Mary Review. He has had stories anthologized by Red Hen Press and W. W. Norton's Flash Fiction Forward. He was been nominated for the Pushcart Prize, and his short fiction collection was a finalist for The University of Pittsburgh Press Drue Heinz Literature Prize and The Iowa Short Fiction Award. He third novel, The Narrow Window, will be released in March 2024 by Roundfire Books, an imprint of Collective Ink.

Gary D. Wilson is the author of the novels Sing, Ronnie Blue and Getting Right, in addition to the story collection For Those Who Favor Fire. He holds an MFA in fiction writing from Bowling Green...


Advance Praise

Wilson's writing is thoughtful, patient, and above all, illuminating. Setting and character converge in highly concentrated light, but it isn't a light by which Wilson forces us to see. Rather, Wilson invites us to consider, in brand new light, the ways in which humans deal with guilt, integrity, fear, duty. The gaps between these elements widen as we read each sentence and fill themselves in with increasing tension. The Narrow Window is a moving work.

Paul Luikarft, author of The Museum of Heartache 


Wilson's writing is thoughtful, patient, and above all, illuminating. Setting and character converge in highly concentrated light, but it isn't a light by which Wilson forces us to see. Rather...


Available Editions

EDITION Paperback
ISBN 9781803414621
PRICE $17.95 (USD)
PAGES 296

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Featured Reviews

I rounded this book up to three stars. The plot of the book was fascinating to me; an American couple went to Africa during the 1960s with the Peace Corps and were the victims of a heinous crime. We see the legal aftermath and how the couple deals with it. The author had a strong sense of place, particularly as the novel went on and the reader really got a sense of what this part of Africa was like at the time (one example was how the author effectively used lists of things people ate or bought, which was very poetic).
The beginning of the book was confusing. Readers were immersed in dialogue when perhaps a bit more grounding in the characters or place might have been helpful. I almost gave up because I was not sure exactly what was happening until 14% in.
However, the biggest issue with the story was that the number of characters was confusing and, even more importantly, the characters appeared to be rather "lukewarm." One would have expected them to be much more upset and/or angry about what happened. It is not that there wasn't any reaction but it did not seem proportionate to the gravity of the situation. The author showed us a little of the effect that the event had on the couple's relationship but, again, not as much as one would anticipate. I think if this aspect was reworked, it would strengthen what would have been a fascinating story.

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