Cover Image: The Introvert’s Edge to Networking

The Introvert’s Edge to Networking

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Member Reviews

This book is exactly what the title implies.  It’s a book about networking as an introvert and how to make it work for you.  And I would think this book would be perfect for introvert people who want to be able to network better.  There are many good things to take away from this book.

Matthew Pollard first guides you in coming up with your “story” to use when networking and then explains how to work that story into the networking arena.  The ideas presented in the book are pretty good ideas for those networking.  I personally will be working in a few of the suggestions into my own life, and even in areas not related to networking.  I liked Pollard's view on the various types of people networking; the "givers, takers, and balance sheet makers" and also how Pollard works a room when networking.  

Since I used this book kind of like a workbook, where I read a chapter and then worked through the concepts presented, this book was a slow read for me.  

Overall, a useful book for introverted people who are networking or who want to learn to network.
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Are you an introvert? Want to be better at networking? Just do it. That's the advice contained in The Introvert's Edge to Networking. Nothing special. No magic formulas. Just do it and everything will be fine. In fact, the author claims you'll do better than any extrovert because you have an advantage. What is it? Who knows but you're going to rock them. Don't worry, you can't lose because he's been amazingly successful and you should want to be like him too and wish you could network with such ease.

It's a silly book that seems to be written by an author who is completely clueless on his on topic of choice and clearly is just looking to pat himself on the back, while bragging to his friends that he has a book.
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<b> I was given an Advanced Reader Copy of this book by the publisher in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own*</b>

<i>The Introvert's Edge to Networking: Work the Room. Leverage Social Media. Develop Powerful Connections</i> is a great resource for those who have their own business or are in sales. The problem I had with this book though, was that it was advertised as if it would work for all introverts in any area of business, even the corporate world! From what I read, this seems to not be the case. A lot of the successes Matthew Owen Pollard mentioned, focused on small business owners who greatly benefited from these steps. That is absolutely wonderful for them, but I just felt as if reading this was a great waste of my time.

Another thing I had a problem with, was his steps seemed to be very marketing based. Basically, Pollard recommends coming up with a Unified Message. Essentially instead of replying to the question "What do you do?" with the answer "I'm an accountant", he wants you to reply with something like "I'm the Dream Saver". This way instead of feeling like you're being transactional, others will be dying to understand what you do! You can tell them a story about what you do and how you've saved someone's business, or benefited their life. As an introvert, this is way out of my comfort zone and seems very "markety" to me. 

This system seems like it's proven to work, but I don't see how any introvert is comfortable using this system. Personally I will be sticking to my current way of things, but I do think Pollard brought up some thought provoking questions. Why do we insist on explaining ourselves based on our technical skills, when we are so much more than that? Why do we as introverts try to play the same game as extroverts when it comes to networking? We are tiring ourselves out with little gratification, we need to work smarter when forming connections. This is one message I will be taking with me in the future.
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Does anyone actually like networking? Matthew Pollard is betting that we'd like it a whole lot more if we saw results! Pollard recognizes that introverts hate awkward chit-chat that goes nowhere. To fix this problem, he lays out steps to defining your niche, creating a unified message, and making clients see the potential you can offer them. Rather than walking up a table cold, he shows you how pre-networking prep can help you find the people you want to meet (who also will love meeting you!) Pollard clearly has a ton of experience in this area, and he backs up his advice with success stories from his own networking experiences, as well as from his clients.

I think Pollard is right on the money when he discusses the value of preparation before networking and taking the time to figure out who you are and what you can offer. Some of his general advice is applicable to everyone (probably extroverts too!) However, a lot of the advice towards the end of the book is mostly for people in sales who are looking for clients, rather than the majority of us who might just be looking for our next job. I would have appreciated some additional targeted advice to the general introvert job seeker. 3.5/5 stars

Thank you to HarperCollins Leadership for providing an ARC on NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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Having read The Introvert’s Edge, I was looking forward to reading The Introvert’s Edge to Networking and this book did not disappoint.  In fact, it blew me away!  I have recently relocated to a new city where I have no network, no connections, and no relationships built for my business.  This has caused me to have to start again building a new network in a different part of the country and do the one thing I really do not like:  networking.  I thought I knew networking even though I dislike it only to find out through this book that the reason I dislike it so much is that I have been doing it mainly transactionally instead of relationally.  That is the secret to great networking that makes you want to get in the room to do it.  Matthew has provided a system with simple steps to make the most out of networking even when you are not thrilled to do it.  I have already started implementing the first step in his system and it is paying dividends for me and my business expansion.
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This book was really, really good! I have never read any of Matthew Pollard’s books and his writing was easy to follow. I liked his stories/examples, even if the person was not in the same industry as me. Actually, I like that he included stories from people in different industries. It just goes to show that with his method, any introvert can network anywhere. I haven’t done it yet, but I’m looking forward to going through his steps and putting pen to paper. I’m also very interested in reading his previous book The Introvert's Edge: How the Quiet and Shy Can Outsell Anyone.
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This is an excellent book for those of us who are introverts and looking to grow our networking skills to better ourselves and move up in our careers. The language is motivational and the author clearly writes as someone who shares the traits of an introvert functioning in a world that seems designed for extroverts. I never really thought about how important listening can really be. Highly recommended.
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I was lucky enough to get a chance to read this book prior to its official release on January 19th. The first book in this series was excellent and I was curious to see if the second was just as good. Overall I was very satisfied with the book. It has many good strategies and stories to show how networking can make a big difference. I would have liked the strategic recommendations to have a separate section so it could be easily flipped to instead of flipping through to find each one. However, even with this minor frustration, I am very pleased with the work of the author and find his stories helpful and engaging for the reader.
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I was first introduced to Matthew when I read his first book, The Introverts Edge – How The Quiet and Shy Can Outsell Anyone.

While you don’t need to read the first book to get the value from The Introverts Edge Guide To Networking, when you have read both books, you will have a complete outline in creating your own successful sales system.

In his new book, Matthew explains why introverts make better networkers.
As an introvert, yes me! I was highly skeptical. How can you even say introvert and networking in the same sentence without breaking into a cold sweat, right?

After four chapters, I stopped being skeptical, and by the end of the book, I actually became a believer that I, too, can do this, and I began to put my own system in place. Which leads me to – you will want to have a pad and pen next to you as you go through the book.

The premise behind this book is that you can take the ideas and information and use them starting now. “As introverts we’re willing to put in the work to obtain a consistent successful outcome.”  Implementing this series in a step-by-step actions that will work for you, if you do the work.

And it’s not hard! Just have your highlighter and the notepad next to you. Think as you read. Which is perfect because we “love being super prepared and equipped for success before we ever walk in a room”. 

It took me about two weeks to read the book, because the first few chapters I kind of read through with the mindset of “networking will never work for me”. Then I really started to connect, to see how this could actually work for me, and any sales professional that identifies as an introvert.

 With true stories and real life examples from people whose paths have changed by using some strategic planning and making a few small tweaks to what they were already doing, Matthew takes you on a journey of how you can systematically become a successful networker, and teaches you how to articulate your value in a way that will make you stand out and inspire genuine interest.

As I went through the book, I realized how much of a networker I am, just not in the traditional way. Yes, I talk to people in line at the grocery store. Yes, I talk to people on planes. Or even online at a theme park. Yes, I am  passionate about what I do and why. And yes, I love what I call “matchmaking” – sharing things (and people) that I really like that I know would be a great fit for each other. Hence the reason for this book review.

By sharing this book with you, my fellow sales professionals, I am introducing you to someone that I know could have a major impact on how you look at your business, and massively help you on your sales journey.

The overall theme about networking that I got from the book is that “being strategic, being prepared, practicing and knowing how to cultivate deeper relations”, and Matthew definitely shows you, throughout the book, to do just that.

Because he’s a very successful Rapid Growth ™ coach, keynote speaker and the founder of the Rapid Growth Academy, who has transformed over 3,500 struggling businesses worldwide. His mission and I quote, is “to help introverts like us to realize that we don’t have to be (or pretend to be) extroverts. That our path to success is different. When we embrace that, while leveraging the power of systemization, we find our Edge, we make our own luck, and we realize our dreams”. 

I can’t think of a better way to summarize this book and the review. 

If you haven’t figured it out already, I highly recommend you read the Introverts Edge to Networking, by Matthew Pollard. 

As a true introvert and skeptic, I did have to push through the first couple of chapters. But it was worth it to get to the gold. Even as a seasoned sales professional, I learned so much on how to improve my networking, and sales. 

This book also comes along at a time in our world where things are constantly changing. By learning how to strategically network in an online world, or face-to-face, and hopefully without a mask someday, you will be more prepared to stay relevant and successful in turbulent times.
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Great book! I would highly recommend this book to anyone just getting into the business world or anyone looking for tips on how to climb from your current position. There are many great ideas in here that will definitely help you meet people and leverage those relationships.
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Introverts and networking aren't words you often put together. Author Matthew Pollard intends to change that. In this new book, Pollard describes the method he teaches his clients to use when networking. Without giving away the book, his method loosely involves scripting what you plan to say in a type of elevator speech, prepping for networking events, and engaging in strategic followup. He demonstrates that his formula is successful by sharing the stories of others who have used it with great success. While I found his method interesting and aspects are applicable to anyone, I think individuals who are entrepreneurs or have their own business will find this book most helpful as that is his specific audience.

I received a complementary copy via NetGalley.
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Having been lucky enough to get an advance copy, I can say that this book follows the strong lead that the first in the series on selling gave; showing the advantages that introverts have in fields that are normally dominated by the extrovert personality.

Matthew shares lots of actionable techniques and tips to help you successful navigate networking in todays noisy world. Highly recommend.
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Honored to receive a review copy from HarperCollins Leadership in exchange for genuine feedback.

Coming from the 1st book, this has the familiarity and tone that one can easily recognize.
The structure, flow, stories... It's so much better, but also very different.

While the previous book focuses on the stages within a sales, this talks about not just within the networking event itself but also the preparations leading to one and the best strategies after it.
As such, the scope is on another level.
Being strategic not only for the main event but also pre- and post-.

Matthew has included a rich personal collection of steps and exercises for reader.
As with the 1st book, they are simple and deceptively effective, but by no means easy.
Covering a wider time-frame, this installment also contains that much more actionable tools.

One will really appreciate how Matthew shared stories this time.
The stories covered come from such a diverse background with different settings looking for different professional outcomes.
It illustrated clearly how the application of the strategies is extensive.

When it comes to business, many people can have a hard time understanding and making sense of niching.
It's a pleasant surprise how Matthew clarified it in such a concise and quick manner.
He talked about what niching down actually is, why it matters (A LOT!), and how and when to do it correctly.

Those are well and good, but nothing beats the values and virtues highlighted inside.
Matthew is such a huge propagator (and embodiment) of authenticity, kindness, being a giver and always putting the others first.
In the world of business and networking, these are rare but deeply appreciated qualities.
The best thing? They work in perfect tandem with everything in this book!

All in all, this book is absolutely a book recommended wholeheartedly - one that's quickly landing on many top lists and becoming a classic!
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I loved how the author gave helpful insights that introverts like me can use in a social setting such as networking, which is the case in this book. I already know most of what is in here before reading the book and I'm a little bit disappointed because I only learned bits of new information. However, this book can really be helpful to introverts that are yet starting to come out of their shell and haven't read or practiced the things included in this.
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Networking looked easy for many of my friends, but it always felt awkward to me. On the other hand, it was easier for me to research and find solutions to difficult problems. Matthew does a great job explaining his first-person research and provides an easy to follow roadmap for making networking both easier and more productive. His storytelling is clear and entertaining, and the examples are easy to apply. While the book is targeted at introverts, the advice would be valuable to anyone interested in networking more effectively.
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As an introvert this book was really helpful and I will definately try some of these things because I really don't like networking even though I know and appreciate the importance of it.  I'm really trying to change my mindset as to what networking really is and this so far has taken some of the fear out of it.  I really appreciate this book and I'll refer to it again.

Thanks to NetGally for the advanced copy of this book and for allowing me to provide my honest review.
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Networking: the plot of every introverted business person’s horror movie, am I right? Well, what if it didn’t have to be? What if we - the introverts of the world - could use our innate skills to network naturally and leave an event with a smile instead of a cringe? We can. Absolutely. In fact, thanks to this book, I am starting to see my introversion as a strength where it has been historically perceived as a weakness. 

Turns out, some of those natural abilities that help define me as an introvert are some of the best networking skills available. Matthew Pollard’s book, The Introvert’s Edge to Networking not only showed me how to see this as reality, it also showed me how to use them to my advantage. 

Matthew discusses one simple trick: being prepared. The depth to which he clarifies his methodology and how he got to it is wonderful and illuminating. A number of tips and tricks are elucidated for us to take, modify, or discard as appropriate. 

It’s not like he’s reinvented the wheel or achieved Networking Enlightenment (well, maybe he has, but that’s another story). Matthew has simply seen what is in front of us and packaged it in a lovely little present for us to open. He provides stories, suggestions, thoughts, inspiration, templates. There is woo-woo stuff and full-stop logical stuff. Bottom line, the way Matthew presents his information works for all sorts of people, probably even those weird extraverts. ;)

Perhaps the biggest thing I have gotten out of Matthew’s books is comfort with my introversion, especially in marketing and networking. Even though they are about all I’ve ever known, it turns out that ‘Spray & Pray’ and ‘If you Build it They will Come’ are not valid marketing strategies. Who’da thunk it? 

Matthew GETS introverts because he is one of us. He shows us we can all get where we want to go. We just have to play to our strengths and not try to force our square selves into round holes.

If you, like me, are an introvert who has always struggled with networking but has to do it to live your best life, this book is worth a read. I received an advance copy of this book in exchange for this review, but all thoughts and opinions are my own. Great book.
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I had the chance to read Matthew Pollard’s second book, The Introvert’s Edge to Networking. The book comes out in a few weeks and follows up his previous book called The Introvert’s Edge. As you’re probably picking up, these books are written by an introvert for those of us who are introverted.

In case this term is unfamiliar to you, I’d generally define introverts as people who draw energy from being alone and spend energy from being with people. By contrast, extroverts draw energy from being with people and spend energy being alone. Most of us enjoy being with people and being alone, but the defining characteristic is how it affects your energy levels.

Like his first book, this one is loaded with practical insights for how to leverage the best of your wiring. By far, the most helpful insight for me from this book was to prepare an answer to one of the most common questions asked when we meet new people: “What do you do for a living?”

Normally, we give a one-word answer. I’m a pastor, a realtor, a salesman, a teacher, an accountant, etc. The problem with these as answers—especially if you’re an introvert—is that it rarely leaves the other person wanting more. They put you into a box of other people they’ve met with that same profession and the conversation usually dies off from there (especially if they have bad examples of your profession, which has often been my experience).

As he explains in the book: “To truly succeed in strategic networking, you can’t bend yourself to what others want, or even what you mean to sell… Everything you do has to be authentic to who you are as a person and a professional.”

As a result, Pollard explains how you need to come up with something they’ve never heard of before and which will prompt them to ask you to explain it. As an introvert, this helps you guide a conversation without needing to come up with small talk (which we are not good at, to begin with).

This was especially timely for me as I was already wondering what to call myself these days. After a bit of thought… I came up with my new title. I’m the Wine Pastor. This gives people enough context since they are likely familiar with wine and also familiar with what a pastor does, but most people have never seen the two put together like this (I hadn’t either). That gives me a chance to tell them more about what I’m passionate about and we can see where the conversation goes from there.

And that’s just one of the steps the book encourages. If you are introverted, I’d encourage you to give it a read and see how it allows you to be more intentional and even excited to meet people you don’t already know.
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As a freelance writer and historian who doesn't have a traditional corporate structure to help with networking and mentoring, I'm always looking for tips and tricks to make the sometimes-awkward process of meeting new business contacts more pleasant. Since I'm an introvert, this book felt like it was written just for me. Matthew Pollard's focus on the ways that introversion actually helps with networking felt like a refreshing take on the topic.
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I received an electronic ARC of this book via Netgalley for an honest review.

This book does, at its core, have some useful advice that I hope to work into my life. That said, it could have taught its lesson in a fraction of its length--and in my opinion, at least, would have been stronger for it. Most of the book's advice centers around identifying your professional passion, identifying a niche audience for it, and then--in essence--crafting a clear mission statement and using that when you meet people.

The biggest issue I had with this book was that, despite being an introvert who struggles with the idea of networking, I spent most of the book feeling like the target audience was a person I both am not and have no desire to be. A considerable portion of the text seems to be aimed at a hypothetical reader who is already either a small business owner or else very successful in their field of passion, working in a capacity that specifically involves sales to wealthy clients. As a government employee whose interests (if not actual employment) are more in public history and cultural resource management, it's a bit of a leap for me to try to apply a lot of this to my own life and career goals.

While the stories that Pollard tells throughout the book do illustrate the method he suggests using to network, they often serve to bulk up the length of the book without adding much substance. The various ways in which he has dazzled everyone he meets (as long as they're affluent, powerful, and/or own a business that caters to the affluent and powerful) is not particularly interesting to me, but I suppose it might have more appeal to someone who really sees themselves in the "business world" or aspires to entrepreneurship.

All that being said, many of Pollard's points doubtlessly are good advice for anyone. Convey your passions clearly and succinctly, be an engaging storyteller, don't try to be everything to everyone but instead be very good at what you are and do. In the end, what I got out of it is that the principles that apply to writing good interpretive signs and exhibit labels probably apply to telling people about yourself, too (though of course Pollard never puts it in those terms--he's "The Rapid Growth Guy," not a cultural resource management/interpretation/public history guy).
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