Cover Image: What Can You Do with a Rock?

What Can You Do with a Rock?

Pub Date:   |   Archive Date:

Member Reviews

I've always been a rock nerd. I was that kid who had pockets full of rocks. This book speaks to that inner child of mine! What a great way to get kids looking at the world with different ideas. Use that imagination!
Was this review helpful?
Well, what can you do with a rock? This book goes over all the things you can do with a rock-notice, kick, skip, collect. . . You can go to a cave or a museum or a bridge or the Grand Canyon to see them. An important thing about a rock is the some of the beauty is inside a rock and hard to see. A rock is like a friend-choose wisely and remember that some of the friend's treasure may be hidden deep inside. 

This is a great story! I love how it links rocks to friendship. It has a great message!
Was this review helpful?
I am torn on this book.. Kids love rocks. I can guarantee there are rocks in multiple rooms of my house this very minute, and I even have a large rock on my front porch from when I was a kid. So, a children's book about rocks seems like it is meant to be. However, I never got a good feel for what the target age range was for this book. The illustrations and lack of significant text make this seem like it was meant for toddlers. That would make sense, as any child allowed to play in nature really doesn't need a book to tell them all of the cool things they can do with rocks. However, the information at the end of the book and suggested learning activities at the end of the book seemed to target elementary ages. While the concept behind the book is great, there really isn't much to the book itself. This was a pass from my kids.
Was this review helpful?
A great book that I thought would be about imagination and nature and play. It turned into a nice story about friendship and how to treat others as well! Definitely a great addition to any kid's library.
Was this review helpful?
Pat Zietlow Miller has done it again with this beautiful book that encourages exploration, science, friendship, and creativity! What Can You Do with a Rock? is a perfect blend of readability and information.
Was this review helpful?
Thanks to Netgalley and Sourcebooks Kids, Sourcebooks Jabberwocky for a free digital copy.

A fun book about the magic of rocks and all the places you can find them, the things you can do with them, and what they all mean.
Was this review helpful?
I have a four year old who is obsessed with rocks (and has been since he was 3!).  He started bringing them home from daycare, and we even got him the National Geographic box of rocks for Christmas (and he loves it!)  So you can understand why I was excited to see this title on NetGalley :-)  It is a cute picture book showing a little girl going about her life while enjoying all the rocks around her in various ways - all things my toddler does and can relate to!  I especially liked the further reading suggestions in the back - I can't wait to check them all out from the library and share them with my son too!
Was this review helpful?
Some people don’t notice rocks. They walk around with their eyes straight ahead never paying attention to what’s below them. Others keep their eyes down, on the lookout for remarkable finds. And after all, rocks are pretty remarkable, aren’t they? Just think of all the things you can do with them: drop them, skip them, study them, change them. You can even share them! And that’s only the start!
What Can You Do With a Rock by Pat Zietlow Miller and illustrated by Katie Kath is a fantastic introduction to rock collecting for children, offering insight into the kinds of rocks that exist, how to organize them, and what to look for. But more than that, it is a tale about appreciating the world around us. About finding something that may be insignificant to someone else and treasuring it—whether that rock is a something or a someone! So go ahead and encourage your kids to get outside and explore. Who knows what they’ll find—or what they’ll do with it! Then ask them: what would THEY do with a rock? I’m willing to bet you’ll never get the same answer twice!
A big thanks to Sourcebooks for the early read.
Check it out yourself on October 12!
Was this review helpful?
Rocks and children are best friends. Pat Zietlow Miller’s question “What can you do with a rock?” sets the inquisitive tone right away! The gorgeous endpapers caught my attention next – all kinds of rocks – from garnet to opal – whetted my appetite to read more… 

“Some people don’t notice rocks,” it begins. But for those who see and appreciate them, the possibilities are endless – you can kick it, drop it or skip it on the water’s surface, sort it or just keep it. While rocks can be collected from many places, some rocks like stalactites are to be admired just where they are. And the best part – rocks are like friends – “Some sparkle right away, while others seem ordinary at first, but have treasure deep inside.”

The illustrations in the book have a calming effect. One that stands out in particular is that of a child balancing on rocks over a stream. This is especially good to teach children how artists sometimes have to make a conscious decision not to include a seemingly important part in order to shift the reader’s focus on another specific aspect – in this case, Katie Kath, by not including the child’s head, has beautifully shifted the reader’s attention to the child’s feet balancing on the rock. 

The books ends with more information on types of rocks and ideas on what can be done with them. And the icing on the cake is the list of more fiction and non-fiction books about rocks, right at the end. So what are you waiting for? Get this book when it comes out in October 2021 and have a rocking good time in class!
Was this review helpful?
This was a sweet story.  It was about collecting rocks. That may sound boring to some, but this book makes it sound fun.  The things they talk about could happen with many things a child chooses to collect.  I love the lesson in friendship at the end.  It just moves so well and is so cohesive of a story.  I think for some children this will be a perfect book that they will want to keep and share with the kids they eventually have.
Was this review helpful?
As an outdoor educator I am always looking for more books that inspire thinking and wonder outdoors. This new book from Zietlow Miller definitely hit the mark. I could use this beautiful book as the kick off to a rock study or a discovery in thee outdoors lesson. I loved her ideas throughout the book and the illustrations. It made me want to go hunt for special rocks like I did when I was a kid.
Was this review helpful?
A sweet book that reminds me that ordinary things can be extraordinary, to mindfully explore the outdoors. and that a little imagination goes a long way. I really liked collecting rocks as a kid, and while almost every I knew in the 90s collected *something* rocks, for sure, weren't cool. I like that this book made me feel like it's okay to like what you like, and to learn more about what you love - rocks, or otherwise.
Was this review helpful?
What a great book about rocks, imagination and friends. You can do so much with a rock: skip it, kick it, sort it, experiment with it, and of course share your love of rocks with a friend. A friend is like a rock because they might have treasure and magic deep inside. With your friend, listen to them and share your story as well, while making some new memories with your rock and your friend. This book makes me want to go outside and find some new rock friends!  You can do a lot with this book with a class, and yes, a friend and two.
Was this review helpful?
Thank you to NetGalley and Sourcebooks Kids for the arc of What Can You Do With a Rock? by Pat Zietlow Miller.

This is a fun book about rocks and rock collecting that I think would inspire many primary students to start looking at the ground with a little more wonder. I appreciate the fact that Miller discusses how some rocks have to be left where they are while some you can take with you, I think that is a very important discussion to have, especially with younger children, as they want to take everything with them. The ways that rocks can be appreciated as enumerated in this story and the pictures help to paint the picture of this really well.
I am excited to add this to my library collection once it is available as I think it will be a good way to introduce wonder into the classroom.
Was this review helpful?
Rocks are everywhere!  They are free and readily available. By using your imagination they can be created into many different things.  This fascinating story shows that rocks can ROCK! 

The award-winning author, Pat Zietlow Miller, suggests many ways you can engage with them.  You can skip, sort, kick, drop, and change them into bridges, jewellery or mosaics just to name a few. But the best thing of all?  You can share them with others. 

"Choose your friend carefully.  People are like rocks. Some sparkle right away, while others seem ordinary at first, but have treasure deep inside. "

The author takes something so readily available and simple and sparks kid's curiosities.  She inspires them to focus on creative play and having fun with rocks.  

"Don't miss their magic. Don't walk by with your head in the air and your hands in your pockets." 


The illustrations are wonderful and enrich the text greatly. They are full of detail and invite you into the story.  I love the book and encourage kids to... ROCK ON!
Was this review helpful?
I received an arc of this title from NetGalley for an honest review.  A great book for kids about all the things you can do with a rock collection.
Was this review helpful?
Nice intro to rock collecting for kids!  I love the end of the book where types of rocks are discussed. It reminded me of geology on school. I think kids can get into this book. year olds up. The story may seem a bit babyish to old kids, but they will read it just for the info on crafting and types of rock and how they are formed. I liked the illustrations for the younger group. May a nonfic can be gotten out of this book for older children, say 4-8 graders?
Kudos to the authors for filling the gap!
Was this review helpful?