Cover Image: Jazz Age Cocktails

Jazz Age Cocktails

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Member Reviews

A fun book of history during the times of prohibition. And after the interesting and vibrantly written historical accounts, recipes that go with that topic. After reading this, I'm wondering if most of life's problems didn't stem from prohibition! The book was a fun and informative read about an era in our history that most people couldn't fathom happening now but that is interesting to know about. A unique and well-written book.
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This book is a great collection of classic drink recipes, lots of them new to me. There are some esoteric ingredients so if you want to step up your drink game, this book will provide you so many new ideas.
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This is an absolutely charming book, chock full of interesting reading and delightful cocktails. It is everything you need to be the most interesting person at a cocktail party. 

I received an ARC, but my opinions are all mine.
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Jazz Age Cocktails is a delightful look into the history behind some cocktails that were beloved in a time that alcohol wasn't always allowed. The detailed explanations of what was happening in that Era combined with the look into what it took to continue to enjoy the forbidden vice makes this book a must read for history and cocktail lovers.
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I loved this book. Loved the history of it and the traditions behind the simple and established act of making a drink. This was a great read and made me quite thirsty!
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It is a quick and interesting read Though it was more of a history book than a recipe book. It was like a condensed version of the history but I think that’s part of what made it so easy to understand.
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My husband and I have recently taken up at home bartending as a hobby which made this book such a fun read! As a history buff (and teacher) the Jazz Age has always interested me. Adding in another hobby of mine made it even more fun. I appreciated the mix of history and cocktail recipes. From the passage of prohibition to the rise of speakeasy’s with passwords and more this era has lots to offer and the book does a wonderful job of encompassing the 1920s. Many thanks to NetGalley for the ARC.
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I enjoyed this book a lot! It has a lot of information, it’s easy and quick to read and it makes me want to look into certain topics more
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Really enjoy the history behind the story of  "Probation era" in America, the information was well presented, easy to understand and interesting, especially to an Australian reader. The cocktails included in the book sound very agreeable, as did the pen drawing that illustrated the book. 
Interesting book.
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This was definitely a fun book with many creative cocktails.

I found some of the trivia quite fascinating.

While all of the above is true, I probably will not buy this book when published because I have so many other cocktail books and this one doesn't stand out as exceptional.
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Jazz Age Cocktails is a charming history of the US Prohibition era, basically the 1920s through the early 1930s. Despite its title, this is not really a “cookbook”. It looks at the social history of the Prohibition era with a focus on how bootlegging worked along with shedding light on the era’s literature and movies, its obsession with flight, and so forth. There’s a good bit about Ernest Hemingway and F. Scott Fitzgerald and his wife Zelda. At the end of each chapter, the author gives recipes for popular cocktails, some of which are familiar to us today (the Old Fashioned, for example) and many more which have faded into obscurity, but which sound delicious. I have had the chance to try a Scofflaw and a Bee’s Knees and they should definitely be more popular, since they call for easily available ingredients. Then there are the drinks named after famous people or types, such as The Flapper, The Sheik or The Theda Bara. Delightful illustrations are scattered throughout the text.

Thank you to NetGalley and NYU Press for the opportunity to read an advance readers copy of this book. All opinions are my own.
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Jazz Age Cocktails is a fun mixture of history and drinks that will satisfy history buffs and cocktail aficionados alike. Tichi provides 17 chapters of 1920s history followed by cocktail recipes that correspond to topics covered in each chapter. All the drinks have colorful names that emphasize the carefree vibes of the Roaring Twenties, and sprinkled throughout are black/white illustrations that, to me, are reminiscent of comic strip style artwork. 
Having already purchased Tichi's book on Gilded Age society ("What Would Mrs. Astor Do?"), I was familiar with her witty, informative writing style. That style is maintained in this book, making it a fun and enjoyable read. As I read, I learned some interesting things; just to list a few: the various words used to describe being tipsy or drunk; the man who and the place where the Bloody Mary drink originated; how the commercial flight industry developed; the fact that drinking alcohol on-screen didn't happen in movies until Prohibition was repealed. My favorites chapters were those covering the 1920s gangsters and rum runners, male and female! The only downside for me is that, while they sound tasty, I probably won't attempt to make or drink most of the cocktails described in the book. Despite that, I enjoyed the book so much that I intend to get her book on Gilded Age cocktails, and have already purchased her Gilded Age novels. I encourage you to do the same!
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This is such a fun and informative book. As a historian, I love to read about history, but this takes it to a whole new level. Tichi makes history fun by relating her discussions about the Jazz Age with delicious cocktails. If you love history, and want to taste it in a new way, I suggest giving this book a try.
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I LOVE books like this where I can learn how to whip up a classic cocktail and regale my friends with the most random information about Al Capone. The illustrations are lovely and this would be a great book to give to a friend who has a bar cart in their house but doesn't know what a Collins is. Books like this oddly come in handy now since a lot of us are limiting time spent at restaurants and bars on Saturday nights. Its nice to stay in and play bootlegger - to whip yourself and a small handful of friends some classic drinks (but only if they know the password to be let in the door) and talk everyone's ear off about Al Capone.
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With Jazz Age Cocktails, I was expecting a typical drink recipe book. Lots of recipes and pictures with a few little tidbits about Jazz and the time era mixed into each recipe. Jazz Age Cocktails was more about the stories and how each cocktail was represented and played a part in the history. One thing that I really appreciated was the hand drawn illustrations that were included in the book. Many times recipe books focus on cultivating beautiful pictures to sell copies. Jazz Age Cocktails really focused on the history without adding a lot of colored images. It was an interesting read that I would highly recommend for anyone interested in classic cocktails, jazz or history.
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I decided not to finish this title. The formatting of the digital copy was terrible. No numbers or the letters "th" were transferred. So, when you are reading about history and want to know a date, it isn't there. Plus, this book is full of recipes for cocktails, which was another reason I was interested. But, they are pointless because there are no numbers or amounts included in the recipes. I did enjoy reading about prohibition and how homes became the center of entertainment and the way to have a cocktail. Homemade drinks became the center of attention at these gatherings. 
Very disappointing as I was interested in this book, but it isn't the fault of the author. It's a formatting issue.
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Jazz Age Cocktail recipes? Yes please!

Cecelia Tichi’s book Jazz Age Cocktails is my favourite type of book: One that interprets social history through recipes. Normally, I love books that provide modern recipes inspired by the time period discussed. But this book works the other way as well. The cocktail recipes themselves inspire the history discussed.

I’ve always found cocktail titles somewhat mysterious. Despite a dedicated reading of the Savoy Cocktail book, I’ve never really understood why a Manhattan (whiskey, sweet vermouth, bitters and a cherry garnish) is called a Manhattan and why a drink with Cognac and orange is always called a Sidecar. It turns out that these names spring from the pop culture references of the day. Sort of like naming a cocktail from 2007 “Charlie bit my finger” or a 2020 drink being called “The Lockdown”.

And, as Tichi explains, despite Prohibition being one of the defining features of the Jazz Age, a LOT of drinking took place. Cocktails were creatively and ironically named with the devil may care attitude of a post-war generation flouting the rules and enjoying the ride. Some of the cocktails have lived on (in name at least) while others have died out. I haven’t heard anyone ask for a “St Valentine’s Day massacre” (whisky, rum, quince, champagne and orange) recently.

Tichi takes the reader on a tour through several important aspects of 1920s society, then provides the cocktail recipes as a kind of post-tour beverage. She discusses the big topics like Prohibition and the loophole-filled Volstead Act that banned the sale of alcohol but ultimately resulted in more drinking than ever before, as well as a rise in crime and violence. But she also looks at topics like music, literature, language, aviation, the economy as well as several others making this a comprehensive, but easy to read book summary of the American Jazz Age.

Jazz Age Cocktails is perfect for anyone who’s ever wondered what’s behind the name of their drink or anyone wanting to impress friends with knowledgeable anecdotes at their next cocktail party.
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Jazz Age Cocktails: History, Lore, and Recipes from America’s Roaring Twenties by Cecelia Tichi.

As the title of this book suggests, this history-cum-recipe book is a jazz of Prohibition, flappers, and cocktails. In the book, Tichi details, through sociological narrative, how literature, music, “politricks,” and cocktails intersected to give birth to the Jazz Age. 

To top it off, Tichi includes authentic cocktail recipes from the Jazz Age. While I’m familiar with several of them, there are others I can’t wait to try, including the Clover Club Cocktail, Live Wire, and Lipstick.
Bottom line: This book is a Champagne Cocktail—a sugar cube of recipes, music bitters, and lots of bubbling history. Serve it in an iced flute and enjoy while reading “Bernice Bobs Her Hair” or A Moveable Feast. Five Stars.

I received this book from NetGalley for review.
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Who won't enjoy a Cocktail book that combines bootleggers, flappers, bootleggers and of course aspiring authors with signature cocktails. I found this an informative and interesting way to read more about the history of the Jazz Age and it really made me think about so many other intriguing tidbits I had heard about but have forgotten over time.

I would recommend Jazz Age Cocktails to anyone who enjoys the fine art of crafting cocktails and who also might enjoy some of the history behind the cocktails that they are sipping. I think It would be a fun book to share at a cocktail party or use as a springboard for a cocktail and Jazz Age themed book club gathering.

I do think it is a shame that this book does not have color photos, the few illustrations do not do the book justice.
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I loved this book!  It is not only full of great cocktail recipes, but is also an informative, lively portrait of America in the 1920's.  The book is also peppered with delightful illustrations.  The incredible cocktail names are reason enough to get this book: "Take the Nickel," "Tommy Gun," "To the Lost," "Petting Pantry," and "Rich Daddy" are just a sampling.  Plus, you get a two-page list of synonyms for inebriated.  Tons of fun, and the perfect gift for the "fried to the hat" friend in your life.
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