Cover Image: A Coin for the Ferryman

A Coin for the Ferryman

Pub Date:   |   Archive Date:

Member Reviews

I'm not a huge sci-fi person, so take this with a grain of salt. I enjoyed the combination of history and sci-fi, but ultimately this was not for me. I was expecting something a bit more like the Sparrow and while this was not at all that, it was a pretty solid read.

Was this review helpful?

This was just a big no for me. I thought the premise was interesting, but it was just too long. The writing wasn’t very captivating and nor was the audio.

Was this review helpful?

Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for this ARC in exchange for an honest review.

The idea of the book which is a group of scientists creating a time machine in order to tranport from the past to the present (1999) Julius Caeser before the moment when he was going to be assassinated by his senators. I was curious to see what the author will do with such an idea. Can you imagine meeting Caeser now?!

However, I have to say that it ended up not being really what I was expecting. I had to ask for the audiobook in order not to DNF this book and it still remained not being an enjoyable experience. The last chapters were the worst for me, how could I believe such a thing?! Did the author wanted to copy Dan Brown or something like that!

It was bad, that's it, I have to be honest. The author could have only wrote an historical romance with Caeser and Cassandra à la Outlander without all those superfluous details that just made this book so long and confusing. I really was hoping for something more exceptional.

Was this review helpful?

I just did not click with this book. The writing style was strange, the jumping between POVs confusing and some subplots or scenes unnecessary

Was this review helpful?

I couldn't get this ARC title to download and am not sure why.

I know my reviewing friends loved it, and I hope to read it some day.

Happy reading!

Was this review helpful?

I had a lot of trouble getting engaged with the story. Strong premise, less strong characters.
I ended up DNFing about 30% through because I kept coming back to it, and couldn't get engaged.

Was this review helpful?

An interestring blend of history and sci fi that makes it a great cross genre intro. Pacing can be a bit off at points but not enough to complain or not enjoy the book.

Was this review helpful?

This ended up not being my particular flavor of historically inspired novel but I'm glad I tried it out! I would read another book from this author for sure

Was this review helpful?

While I liked the story, the format of the arc was extremely difficult to read. But focusing on the overall story, I love Greek mythology and so enjoyed the twists that Megan Edwards brought to this idea.

Was this review helpful?

Took me awhile to really get into this book, but once I did I enjoyed it for the most part. It was slow at times, but I still wanted to know how it all ended

Was this review helpful?

I received an ARC via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

While the idea of this book seemed pretty interesting, it just didn't go any where for me, and I was glad when I finally finished it. I did not like all the extra information we got on every character, and the way women were portrayed and talked about in this.

I would not recommend this book.

Was this review helpful?

I grew up in a classical school, so Caesar and his writing is intimately familiar to me. Not only that, but the mythology and history of ancient Greece and Rome have always fascinated me. So I picked up A Coin for the Ferryman with huge expectations-
and it met every single one of them. I absolutely adored both the characterization of Cassandra and Caesar, the two main characters of the story. I adored the parallels drawn between the modern characters, such as Cassandra and Alexander, and their ancient namesakes that Caesar would have recognized so well.
Amazingly, this story manages to combine technology and science with ancient literature and classical influences in a way that is incredibly enjoyable. (AND THE TIME TRAVEL MADE SENSE, GUYS. IT MADE SENSE.)

Was this review helpful?

Such an interesting plot, I have to say. Time travel is quite hard to write and I love that the author managed to make it flow easily for the readers not to get confused. The ending was slightly predictable but it was still an enjoyable read.

Was this review helpful?

“In 1999, an elite interdisciplinary team headed by Nobel laureate Andrew Danicek gathered in California to carry out a ground-breaking time-travel experiment. While the rest of the world remained unaware, Julius Caesar was successfully transported from the last day of his life to a specially-constructed covert facility.”

Another book that just wasn’t for me. The premise for this book was fantastic. Time travel? Academia? Ancient Rome? Romance? This checked so many boxes. I just couldn’t get into the story, however. The author spent so much time on character backgrounds, that I was 40% into the story and still nothing had happened. Add to the glacial speed of the plot, the flatness of characters and the unaddressed misogyny, I was glad when this book was over.

4/10

Thanks to NetGalley and Imbrifex Books for this ARC.

Was this review helpful?

I loved this weird, quirky story. Bringing someone to the future from ancient Rome seems impossible. Yet this book makes you think that just maybe the science works. Plausibility is the key to a great science fiction book and for classicists this is a cotton candy read.

Was this review helpful?

I expected this book to be a rollicking read along the lines of Michael Crichton's excellent 'TImeline'. THis book was a huge disappointment, and a waste of time. It has a fun premise and I think the author really does know her classics-her references are quite fun at times, but the book is awful. The author seems to have an unhealthy fascination with powerful men who can supposedly wave a wand and get tings done, and valorises that, while completely ignoring socio-economic realities that make things that way. It's also a deeply misogynistic book despite having a female protagonist. Not recommended at all.

Was this review helpful?

*I received an ARC via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. Thanks for the free book*

"A Coin for the Ferryman" is about a group of scientists discovering time travel. There's rules to it but what they end up doing, after a few trial runs, is getting Julius Caesar to their lab just moments before he is stabbed (BEWARE OF THE IDES OF MARCH BRO). There is chaos, intrigue, and of cooooourse one of the scientists kinda falls in love with Caesar.

It was a nice thought experiment, I give them that. But the outcome was somewhat predictable and at the same time underwhelming. Nice touch taking Caesar to Caesars on the Vegas strip though, I enjoyed the irony.

If you like stuff like this, read it.

3.5 stars

Was this review helpful?

Many thanks to Netgalley, Imbrifex Books and the author for the ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.

A coin for the ferryman follows the story of a time travelling experiment by Andrew Danicek and his multidisciplinary team, where they are trying to bring back people from history who are destined to die, so that the world can know firsthand what happened in the past. The persona they decide to bring back is none other than Julius Caesar. The story that follows is a mixed plot with mafia, science, history, classics, and love.

I am a sucker for historical fiction, especially, anything Greek or roman, but unfortunately this book was a big let down for me. The story plot was gripping and the journey was a bumpy ride but the over explanation of each characters pasts, the subtle (not-s0-subtle) sexism, misogyny, profiling, was absolutely frustrating.

When I started reading the book and was reading all these extended explanations of how hot the women are, I would go back to ensure that this book was not written by a man. Why? because the way the women here are portrayed, was in many ways worse that the so called 'male-gaze' (all women referred to here are scholars in their own right, however the only time their knowledge or talents are appreciated is in the form of backhanded compliments noting them as eye-candy). The age difference between couples was entirely a different topic of discussion, in short the profiling and cringey weird ass romance had me running the other way. I don't think I have rolled my eyes so much in disgust while reading a book. I understand the book being set in 1990's, there was a certain need for flair towards the women to denote the era, but considering the author themselves note that this book took 20 years to be completed and the story actively ends during the pandemic, a little more respect would have made the book bearable (come on, hundreds of years of fighting for respect and we are still written as 'she may be a researcher well-versed in Latin and history, but she sure does make good eye-candy so even if Caesar does not appreciate the knowledge, he will appreciate her body!! excuse me what?? and this coming from a Nobel laureate!! ughhhh)

Also the whole insistence in the beginning about Caesar being gay and then Caeser coming along and insisting he is straight with 4 wives was just....sorry...this book as you can see tested my patience.....

TW: misogyny, sexism, homophobia, death, blood, violence, 'instalove'😖😖🤢

Was this review helpful?

If Julius Caesar were given a choice of when and where in the far flung future to visit, I'm pretty sure it would have gone as Ms. Edwards outlines! While this was a fun read, there was explaining at the front of the tale that seemed like extra-credit. Weaving in myths and cultural landmarks was too brief for me. . . I would have loved more of that.

But the real rodeo started with the actual time-jumping four days, and his JC's time with Cassandra - that was fun to imagine along with the book. With all the warnings about consequential changes that could ruin the future, it seemed odd that the ultimate consequence being left in the future wasn't even really addressed - Julian - but still fun to think about!

If you're into Ancient Rome, Latin and Caesar's Palace. . .you'll dig this!

A sincere thanks to Megan Edwards, Imbrifex Books, and NetGalley for an ARC to read and review. #ACoinfortheFerryman #NetGalley

Was this review helpful?

In literature, as in anything, too much is too much. And 'too much' is the main flaw in this book, which would have all the makings of a delightful thriller with elements of hard science and an exceptional co-star: Julius Caesar. It is clear that the author has done his homework in the historical reconstruction of the character, carefully reading what Caesar wrote about himself and others wrote about him (for the record, Caesar was not gay, but like many men of his time bisexual, but perhaps a certain prudishness prevented the author from touching the key of how his contemporaries described him, i.e. 'the husband of all wives and the wife of all husbands'). Having said that, since I am an editor, I have to say that a good editing job would have discouraged the author from inserting at least two too many characters, which forced him to introduce some completely unnecessary subplots and a long scene that almost made me close the book, and would have made him put the end where it should have been put. A pity, because this is a well-written and, in general, quite entertaining novel.

Was this review helpful?