A Coin for the Ferryman

A Novel

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Pub Date 01 Mar 2022 | Archive Date Not set

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Description

The story can now be told.

In 1999, an elite interdisciplinary team headed by Nobel laureate Andrew Danicek gathered in California to carry out a ground-breaking time-travel experiment. While the rest of the world remained unaware, Julius Caesar was successfully transported from the last day of his life to a specially-constructed covert facility. Four days of conversation with historians and Latin scholars were planned, followed by Caesar’s return to the moment from which he was extracted. But despite the team’s meticulous efforts to maintain secrecy and plan for all possible exigencies, a kidnap attempt plunges Caesar into peril. Fully aware that the future of civilization may hang in the balance, one team member must summon strength she didn’t know she possessed to return Caesar to the Ides of March.

The shocking details of Caesar's visit and its effect on subsequent events have been protected by draconian nondisclosure agreements....until now.
The story can now be told. In 1999, an elite interdisciplinary team headed by Nobel laureate Andrew Danicek gathered in California to carry out a ground-breaking time-travel experiment. While the...

Advance Praise

" If you have studied Classics in Rome as she has, or if you just want to know more about what might have happened on the Ides of March, this book is for you. A Coin for the Ferryman provides fun reading for beach or forum.”–Michael Maas, the William Gaines Twyman Professor of History at Rice University, and author of Readings in Late Antiquity, The Cambridge Companion to the Age of Justinian, and John Lydus and the Roman Past.

"Megan Edwards gets us turning pages”–David Brin, best-selling author of Star Tide Rising, The Postman, Existence, the Out of Time series.

"“Fascinating characters and their often sad stories coalesce into an unforgettably wonderful tale of time travel and its consequences, thrilling one moment, tragic the next."–W. Jeffrey Tatum, best-selling author of Always I Am Caesar, The Patrician Tribune, and Professor of Classics at The Victoria University of Wellington.

"“A Coin for the Ferryman is a fascinating thought experiment, and one rooted in a deep love for the classics and knowledge of them."–Greg Woolf, the Ronald J Mellor Professor of Ancient History at UCLA, and author of Et tu Bruté, The Life and Death of Ancient Cities, and Rome: An Empire’s Story.

“Megan Edwards masterfully combines her extensive knowledge of the classical world with her literary skills to produce an intriguing and compelling novel.”–Stephen L. Glass, Professor Emeritus of Classics and Classical Archaeology, Pitzer College




" If you have studied Classics in Rome as she has, or if you just want to know more about what might have happened on the Ides of March, this book is for you. A Coin for the Ferryman provides fun...


Available Editions

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ISBN 9781945501159
PRICE $29.95 (USD)

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Average rating from 32 members


Featured Reviews

I thoroughly enjoyed this story! Nobel prize winner Andrew Danicek has built a “time machine”. He sets up a team and after a series of positive tests decides to bring a prominent historical figure to the future, Julius Caesar. So now you have a man who lived 2000 years ago, walking around in our time. One of our other MC’s Cassandra is picked to be his “hostess” because she’s fluent in Latin. But nothing goes as planned! Caesar can’t remain in our time, because they don’t know how and if it will influence the future. But will they be able to, with everything that has happened?

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This book sounds amazing, as in its story, and really it is. It doesnt get bogged down in the science, but there is enough there to make it sound plausible, and that is all you really need. The writing is good, descriptive but not flowery, and the characters are fun, if you love them or hate them. I did not see elements of the ending, and I loved being surprised by that. This is a must read!

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The premise of A Coin for the Ferryman is an intriguing one, especially for anyone interested in Ancient Rome. What would one of the most famous ancient Romans think of today’s modern society? I felt that Edwards gave us compelling characters in Caesar and Cassandra, but so many others fell flat for me. And the introductory chapters, especially the parts with the 1970s archaeologists, felt unnecessary. However, the book really picked up for the last third or so, and I found myself saying “just one more chapter” over and over, well past when I should have gone to bed! Thank you, NetGalley, for providing the book in exchange for an honest review. #netgalley #acoinfortheferryman

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I love time travel novels. This book by Edwards does not disappoint. The writing style keeps one captivated throughout the book. I was surprised to the last page.

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I really enjoyed this book and it gave me a well needed lift to my day. The insight and humour spoke volumes about the experiences and challenges that we were guided through as the audience. I am very glad I read this book and would highly recommend..

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4.5 stars. This novel surprised me. My interest was piqued by the synopsis. A time machine brings Julius Caesar into the present day for a four-day visit? Sounds good to both my science-loving side, and my history loving side. I was expecting something a little dry with lots of history and scholarly references. Something smart, and a little clinical. What I got was a rich novel that I couldn’t put down. It was definitely smart. But rather than clinical it was personal. This was all about the characters, for me, which I loved. It was beautifully written, and a unique story. The pandemic has been hard, and reading this novel turned out to be a bright light. I got to experience wonder, and awe, the satisfaction that comes from dedicating oneself to a scholarly pursuit - to dedicating oneself to high level values. There was adventure. Uncertainty. Drama. Hope. Philosophy. Messy, imperfect humans just being messy, imperfect humans. It reminded me a little bit of The Overstory by Richard Powers, in writing style. Lighter in terms of the narrative. Storytelling which can be complicated, using a gentle, nuanced voice. So happy I found this novel and had the pleasure of reading it. Thank you to NetGalley, Megan Edwards, and Imbrifex Books for providing me with an ARC in advance of the March 1, 2022 publication date so that I may provide my fair and honest review.

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If you could pick anyone in history to talk to, who would it be? Well, what if it could happen? A Coin for the Ferryman blends philosophy, sci-fi, and a whole lot of drama into an entertaining read! It's great (and consistent!) that Cassandra's name and the title of this book tie in with Greek mythology. After all, they were planning to pluck Julius Caesar out of time! Speaking of, I love the concept of the book. Time-travelling shenanigans? Playing around with history and historical figures? Sign me up! Plus, the attention to detail regarding the dangers of time-travelling and said-plucking-out-of-time, from things such as being vulnerable to diseases or altering history, adds to the tension. That being said, it took some time for the book to gain momentum. Around the end of the first quarter 'till the middle, the plot was unfolding a little slower than expected due to some stray subplots that might've been better acting as backstories. But, right after that things took a turn and the action kept coming! P.S. That surprise twist at the *very* end caught me off-guard (But I should’ve known!) Thank you to Netgalley and Imbrifex Books for providing me with the e-arc.

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Thank you netgalley for providing an ARC in exchange for a review What would happen if scientists brought Julius Caesar to the 20th century? While Julius Caesar isn't my favorite historical figure from this time, it makes sense that he was the chosen by scientists to bring to the present : he's well known, and his life influenced many others. The plot of this book is very interesting, there are many characters, points of views and periods covered, but the author manages to keep it clear and interesting. The latin-nerd in me is very happy!

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I wasn't sure what to expect when I opened this book and I'm happy to say that I was pleasantly surprised! As a fan of time travel and ancient history, I loved *almost* every moment of this book. While some bits were a bit slow-paced, they fit well within the framework of the story and served to build up to those moments that made the wait worthwhile. My sole gripe was that most of the characters were somewhat unlikeable, but then again, who ever said that characters had to be likeable for a story to be good? My favorite character was undoubtedly Julius Caesar himself. Despite being a historical figure that I despise (I mean, the guy colonized half the world), I found his characterization here to be quite endearing. Edwards didn't recreate some cheap, gimmicky knock-off Julius Caesar, she brought the real one to life. He was calculated and cunning, just like his real-life counterpart, and I loved how he was portrayed as a human being more so than an antique statue brought to life. I would have loved for the other characters to have the same level of development and detail as Caesar and Cassandra had, but alas, c'est la vie. I loved how Edwards weaved in bits and pieces of history throughout the novel, which brought the history itself to life as well. And I was glad that the romance aspect was mild, as I was afraid it would consume the entire plot. A very enjoyable read that I would heartily recommend to anyone who's fascinated by ancient history and the concept of time travel.

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An interesting premise not dissimilar to Timeline by Michael Crichton. In this, scientists in a secret lab successfully lift Julius Caesar out of history moments before his murder on the Ides of March and bring him to the 21st Century for 4 days before returning him to Ancient Rome. It's a fun if preposterous lead - the characters' behaviours are a bit 2- dimensional and the main character completely unbelievable as a gorgeous showgirl plucked from Vegas to study Latin. It's daft but enjoyable..

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My interest was piqued by the synopsis. I liked the idea, and it was full of all needed “spices” for a good novel: philosophy, history, sci-fi, and a lot of drama. Caesar is one of the greatest characters in human history. A great portrait of the figure of the one who knew how to rise from complete darkness to become the richest man in the world and has a power capable of ending the Roman Republic. At his death Caesar dominated almost the entire known world and this charisma lasts after more than 2,000 years. I liked how the author made him more human and showed a very sensible face of the entity. It was so much fun to just imagine how Caesar would react in today’s modern society and how his attitude might be translated to our modern times.

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This was truly an experience. I was hooked from page one up until the very end. What started as a story of a normal girl working in Las Vegas turned into an extraordinary experience bending the timelines and the perception of right and wrong. The experiment of kidnapping Cesar so realistic that after finishing this book I wondered if it really happened. It made perfect sense to keep it a secret and share the story now after some years. But what felt even more real was the relationship between Cesar and Cassandra. It was wonderful. It was all I ever wanted. And it brought up the main question of a book. How much would you sacrifice for someone you cared for, even if it meant disrupting your world completely.

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What a fun book - the premise is a great one to start with, the characters are interesting with good depth, and the writing is solid. It was so fun to think about how Caesar would react today, and how his attitude, worldview, everything would translate to how we live now. This is just a really fun book that flips a few tropes around, with a somehow endearing Caesar (which honestly, is not how I generally would have ever thought Caesar would be) who was still calculating and cunning. I loved how history was woven throughout, that I would recommend to a lot of people but especially those looking for a different type of historical fiction, has a bit of a latin nerd inside them, and has a very clever twist that I really enjoyed. Absolutely worth a read. Thanks to NetGalley for an ARC.

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A coin for the ferryman had me hooked until the last page and for good reason. Edwards creates an incredible atmosphere while at the same time, teaching about historical events. Admittedly, despite being a Classical Studies major, I do not know a lot about Ancient Rome or Julius Caesar and this has definitely opened my eyes to many different things that I didn't know about happened in Ancient Rome (or that I simply knew of but did not know the details). I definitely had a very enjoyable time with this book and will be buying it and checking out more of Edwards' future books! Thank you to NetGalley for an e-ARC

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The well crafted story of " a coin for the ferryman" is a great entertainment, The synopsis introduces the intrigue, and then it is a guessing game ! The book is to be enjoyed bits by bits, just to have the fun to try to guess what will happen next. I am hoping for more now, Megan Edwards produced the best time travel story I ever read ! I want to buy a pile of books to offer as gifts ! All my opinions are mine, I received an advanced copy from NetGalley.

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🖊 B O O K - R E V I E W 🖊 ⬇️A Coin for the Ferryman by Megan Edwards ⬇️ Plot: ⚡️⚡️⚡️⚡️⚡️/5 Protagonist: ⚡️⚡️⚡️⚡️/5 Ending: ⚡️⚡️⚡️/5 Plot: In 1999, an elite interdisciplinary team headed by Nobel laureate Andrew Danicek gathered in California to carry out a ground-breaking time-travel experiment. While the rest of the world remained unaware, Julius Caesar was successfully transported from the last day of his life to a specially-constructed covert facility. 🌈 I was hooked the second I started reading this book, so much so, that I began taking notes on characters stories. The narrative is told across different timelines, a little confusing at first but it does get easier. I created a wild spider diagram so I could understand who I had met and why. Totally worth it. 🌈 I love to read a book based only on the title & cover art. Sometimes it works out, others it doesn’t. But this time, it worked. I thought it was going to be a story set in Ancient Rome, I was mistaken, instead I got Las Vegas & LA. I wasn’t disappointed because I thoroughly enjoyed it none the less. 🌈 Overall, I would say it’s a good book but the ending was lackluster. Personally, I would have ended the book earlier, the end chapter is irrelevant. But, I still loved it. Solid 4. Overall Rating:⚡️⚡️⚡️⚡️/5 Would I read it again?

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I feel like this book had so much potential it just didn’t hit the right spot for me. Other people would 100% enjoy it but for me it was too complex & tedious throughout. There was a lot of jumping back and forth between past and present and honestly i was lost 99% of the time. Absolutely loved the concept & idea of it i just didn’t personally vibe with the writing style.

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Fantastic, Thrilling and Unique................. A Coin for the Ferryman by Megan Edwards is a fantastic time travel thriller fiction. The plot has everything, from time travel to romance. But, the best part of the book is its climax which will keep you thinking about the plot for a long time. The author has amazingly plotted thrill, adventure and romance in one book. Also, diverse characters make the story more interesting. I would give the book 5 stars.

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Time travel x Julius Caesar = one interesting concept; the moment I saw the description for this book, I knew I just HAD to read it. This multiple POV story takes scifi-fantasy realism and interweaves it with historical retellings of Caesar's life, bringing a touching tale with rich depth of character. This was an enjoyable read, at some times fantastical in the most comical way. I did feel that some moments that were supposed to be climactic and consequential to the plot fell a little short—at times I found myself having to flip back a few pages, confused after missing an important plot point. However, the rest of this tale was a delightfully whimsical read, and brought a breath of life through an intersection of topics that usually remain exclusive to academic fields.

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We've all been asked at one point, who would you invite to a dinner party, dead or alive? Andrew Danicek, is a Nobel Laureate who creates a time machine to bring back Julius Caesar from the minute before he dies at the Ides or March. The book flows like a river through it's twists and turns, while never losing sight of it's main goal. The characters are well written, and the plot is easy to follow, although the only hole I can see is when Andrew searchs for Andrej, the German boy he stood in for. Why didn't it occur to him to search for Dieter? This is a beautifully written book that I shall be buying when it's published.

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A group of scientists get together in 1999 to conduct a time travel experiment, ringing a person from history into the current times. Cassandra is a young scholar fluent in latin, a skill that is required for bringing Julius Caesar into the future, as she solely is able to communicate with their guest. When Ceasar arrives, things don't go according to plan. Where they expected to converse and understand more about Caesar's time, the experiment goes wrong and Cassandra and Ceasar are on the run from people wanting to hunt down Caesar. It has what you would expect, a bit of fish out of water, and whilst other books (eg. 'Look Who's Back') have dealt with the historical figure/fish out of water with a bit more humour, this book takes us through a romance which frankly, we could have done without. There's a few things that were teased at the start that just didn't go anywhere, which was a shame. Overall, it was interesting, but the emphasis on a cliched romance left behind some other elements of a story that could be been explored.

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Thank you to NetGalley and Imbrifex books for giving me a digital arc of this book to read in exchange for an honest review. This started slow and really developed characters with interesting back stories. I enjoyed that academia atmosphere and the top-secret, sketchy research vibe. Then when things were established and started to ramp up, it read like an academic thriller/suspense movie. The drama within the IDES project team kept me turning pages. There were a couple of action set pieces that added to that movie feel. I enjoyed the author's use of Las Vegas as a setting. It is clear that the author lives there and you feel the difference between the strip and off the strip. When they are on the strip, she used the extreme luxyry and theatricality of the setting well. There is the time travel element and those issues and paradoxes were addressed. Still, this did not feel strongly sci-fi forward to me. It is a well told and entertaining story with vividly drawn characters.

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Thanks to Imbrifex, Netgally and Ms. Edwards for a free ARC copy. The book started a bit slow and it was hard to fit Caesar inton the story. Once he appeared, the story became exciting and started to speed up a bit. The author did a good job breathing Julius Caesar back to life. This is not the first book about Caesar but this is surely something different. This book is for history buffs and thriller lovers.

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I was very intrigued by the summary, and I did enjoy the story. At the beginning of the book we were introduced to so many characters, and they were all in different situations…It was a little confusing and a bit overwhelming. However, once I knew the characters better it was easier for me to follow. There was a lot of back story in this book and sometimes it felt unnecessary. I did like the time travel aspect of it. I did wish there was more time with Caesar. I wish his and Cassandra’s relationship was more fleshed out. Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher in exchange for my honest review.

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I'm a huge fan of both time travel and Roman history - and overall I really liked this book, tho I wish the character development was more fleshed out. Some of the characters felt one dimensional. Overall I enjoyed it very much.

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This book hit all the right notes for a travel book. From timeline to other time travel, historical fiction was impressed with how she pulled this story together. It was an enjoyable read I recommend for others. It becomes a little predictable in the plot but was still a pleasure to read.

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