Everything Together

A Second Dad Wedding

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Pub Date 01 Aug 2021 | Archive Date 15 Sep 2021
Red Chair Press, One Elm Books

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Description

When Jeremiah arrives in Minneapolis to spend the summer with his Dad, everything feels odd. His dad's fiancé, Michael, has buried the apartment in piles of DIY wedding decorations. His best friend Sage now spends all her time with a new girl as quirky and bright as Sage ever was. Everywhere he goes, Jeremiah feels like the odd one out. Eager for something to get him away from all this, he starts volunteering in an English class for refugees. As the summer goes on, Jeremiah finds community in new places and with unexpected friends.

Everything Together is about exploring your place in the world and the tangled ways we connect.

When Jeremiah arrives in Minneapolis to spend the summer with his Dad, everything feels odd. His dad's fiancé, Michael, has buried the apartment in piles of DIY wedding decorations. His best friend...


A Note From the Publisher

Sequel to highly acclaimed Second Dad Summer released August 2020.

Sequel to highly acclaimed Second Dad Summer released August 2020.


Advance Praise

"A fun and tender story about all the best things in life: family, friends, community, and all the ways they intersect." --Amy Oelkers, Youth Services Librarian, Washington County, MN

"A fun and tender story about all the best things in life: family, friends, community, and all the ways they intersect." --Amy Oelkers, Youth Services Librarian, Washington County, MN


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National Review program

Regional author appearances & signings


National and Regional Advertising

National Review program

Regional author appearances & signings



Available Editions

EDITION Other Format
ISBN 9781947159655
PRICE $16.99 (USD)

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Average rating from 20 members


Featured Reviews

Thank you NetGalley for an advanced copy. I did not read the prequel, but you do not really need to in order to understand this book. There is a lot of diversity and tolerance in this book. I wanted to read this book to see how the Muslim and refugee characters are viewed. This isn't something I would get for our school library, with the LGBTQ content and occasional "bad" word. I did appreciate the message that even while not all Christians or Muslims agree with LGBTQ, treat people with respect, because if people do not practice your religion, why expect them to follow your Holy Book, too? It's not a particularly funny or adventurous story, and but the themes of friendship, interpersonal relationships, growing up, identity, etc. really shine through. There is no room for hate against family, queer, refugees, or people from different religions.

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Another "feel-good" novel like the first. The story teaches life-skills of love and respect in diversity. Loved it.

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This is an interesting book encouraging equality, diversity and tolerance to others. It is the second book in a series, I haven't read the first book but that did not matter. Thank you to NetGalley and the publishers for my ARC.

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A sweet queer-themed middle-grade novel about 13-year-old Jeremiah navigating the impending wedding of his father and the father's boyfriend. The wide and diverse cast of characters was great, but at one point it also seemed that the author was trying to shove in too many side plots, leaving some threads unravelled in the end. For example, the friendship between Jeremiah and Sage and their drifting apart was never really addressed fully. This could be a great book to get young children thinking about diversity and inclusion in their immediate circles. At one level I felt that the book was somewhat didactic; at another, I felt that these kinds of books are so desperately needed. (Review copy from NetGalley)

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Jeremiah thinks he will have another summer in Minneapolis like the one he had the previous year only to discover so much has changed. He arrives at his dad’s home to find his dad’s fiancé, Michael, in the throes of wedding preparations including doilies and everything coordinated in chocolate and teal. Seeking to escape the craziness, Jeremiah seeks out Sage, his best friend from the previous summer only to find Sage with another best friend, Asha. Feeling as an outsider in their relationship, Jeremiah seeks out other things to fill his time. He volunteers with refugees who are learning English, even helping establish a community garden. And when Jeremiah meets Asha’s twin brother, Asad, in an awkwardly adolescent way, a new friendship is forged. With lightness and humor, Klas illustrates aspects of teen life such as friendship and parent-teen relationships. More importantly, he addresses issues not as frequently found in adolescent literature: bisexuality, the LGBTQ+ community, and racism. He gently guides his readers to see the importance of accepting people in all their differences. Fian Arroyo’s drawings at the beginning of each chapter give the readers a delightful peek into what they might expect. Readers will chuckle at times and at other times be appalled at the cruelness of people, yet readers finish the book with a sense that even in the midst of disappointment or sheer craziness, relationships sustain us through it all. And we hope to see Jeremiah again next summer!

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In this series, every summer Jeremiah has to deal with changes to his life, expectations, and the boundaries of his knowledge and world. That's exactly what it means to be an adolescent, and this series handles that so well. The first book dealt with divorce, remarriage, and LGBTQIA issues. To those this book adds dealing with changing friendships, learning about other cultures, and refugees and immigration. Everything is handled beautifully and with such a great relevance for the target age group.

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I love all the rep in this! It’s ethnically diverse and inclusive of LGBT, which is enough to make me approve of this for children. it’s super important that kids are able to read these stories :) I’m not the target audience for this book, so while I’m not going to rate it as I normally would book, I’ll rate it a bit higher.

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This is a great book for children to read and be exposed to diversity. Working in a grade school I would definitely recommend this book to teachers and parents of kids who meet the appropriate reading level.

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I enjoy the theme of these books. I find them to be well written for the age group and not trying to hard to get main points across, like books sometimes do at this level. I enjoy the LGBTQ+ aspect but even more so, that the book focuses on Jeremiah and his life with his family and friends having supporting roles, like adolescents’ lives truly are. I look forward to more books In this series.

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I wish I had friends with young kids, I'd be buying them this book, and the first in the series, [book:Second Dad Summer|40880154], as well- they are both such wonderful stories! I had no idea there was going to be a sequel to Second Dad Summer so it was a happy surprise when I saw Everything Together up on NetGalley! Like SDS, Everything Together was entertaining, heart-warming, and full of life lessons. Jeremiah is back with his dad and Michael for another summer, and boy how things have changed. Instead of spending the summer with his best friend Sage like he hoped, he finds himself a little lost. Sage has a new bff she's busy with, which leaves Jeremiah floundering. As much as he doesn't mind helping Michael, there's only so much wedding prep a 13yo boy can handle. Left to his own devices he ends up making a new friend, and finding something that gives his summer purpose. I really enjoyed seeing Jeremiah really grow and expand his horizons over the course of the summer. I loved how Benjamin Klas hits on relevant topics in such a way that they're understandable for the target demographic. I liked that there was such a diverse cast of characters, which I think could lead to some great dialogue for young readers. There are definitely a lot of teaching moments in this book, without being overly preachy or in your face, and I felt like I was leaning things right along with Jeremiah. Sap that I am, there might have been a few tears shed as the summer came to a close.

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It's the next summer after the events of Second Dad Summer and Jer is excited for all of the fun that he is going to have until he learns that his best friend from the previous summer has a new best friend... A really well-written, beautiful story that dives straight back into the would of Second Dad Summer. I really enjoyed the addition of Muslim characters to the story as well as watching Jer meet some amazing refugees and learn from them. Fingers crossed there will be more books in this series.

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I especially liked that this book had 2 dads. There are more books like this that are coming, but it was refreshing. I liked the way it was presented to kids and it was very age approrpriate. I liked it and hope to see more like it in the future.

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This was hilarious and adorable all at the same time. I found myself rooting for these characters and loved the representation it brought to the genre. Thank you for the e-arc!

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E ARC provided by Netgalley Jeremiah is back in Minneapolis to spend the summer with his dad and his fiance, Michael, as they are planning their wedding for August. Michael, who works in a grocery store and is very unique, is creating a lot of Pinterest worthy crafts for the wedding, in teal and cocoa, and Jeremiah frequently gets roped into helping. While he's excited to be back to hang out with his friend Sage, he is a bit rebuffed to find that she has a new best friend, Asha. Jeremiah doesn't like to share his friends, so the two don't spend quite as much time bike riding. There's still a bit of it, and Jeremiah has grown enough that he needs a new bike, and his dad treats him to a really nice one. With time on his hands, he agrees to work at the Bridge, where Sage's one mother works, to help immigrants settle in the US. He really enjoys learning about other cultures and helping out. He also makes a friend in Asha's twin brother, Asad, and the two hang out, biking around and going to Asad's father's coffee shop, Bulshada. There is a racial incident when the Bridge community garden is destroyed, but the neighborhood rallies around. As the wedding approaches, Michael gets more and more nervous, and bad weather threatens some of the plans for the outdoor wedding. While the summer wasn't exactly the same as the one before, Jeremiah still has a good time visiting his father. Strengths: There have got to be a lot of children from divorced families who spend summers with a noncustodial parent, and who have to make friends and find things to do. Jeremiah's Minneapolis neighborhood is a very fun, active, and inclusive place. Last summer, in Second Dad Summer, he was working with the garden, so it's good to mix things up with him working at the Bridge. His friendship with Sage is understandable, and it's nice to see him befriend Asad, and also think through what effective charity is like. This is a quick read that will appeal to elementary readers who want to read about older characters with more freedom, or to middle school students who are interested in summer stories. Weaknesses: What kind of heathen ModPodges crocheted doilies to balloons to make lanterns. I...feel...faint... (I also own a LOT of hand crocheted doilies, and yes, put them under things on wooden furniture. I'm pretty sure my female ancestors would actively haunt me if I ModPodged them to anything.) What I really think: This is a great book showing vibrant LGBTQIA+ communities and includes themes of racial justice as well without becoming overly political, which will add to the longevity of the book.

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I haven´t read the prequel yet but that didn't matter because I really enjoyed this book! I would really recommend this book for children, even for teachers to make kids read this book at school in class, it´s so important to show them stories with good representation about diversity, racial justice and the LGBTQ+ community. Jeremiah has to deal with changes to his life, expectations and the book shows very good how´s like to be a teenager. It really was an adorable book. Hope there's a next book of this series coming!

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It's been nine months since Jeremiah has been in Minneapolis on vacation. Throughout this time, he has kept in touch with Sage, but what he really wanted was to return to see her, spend time together and discover new places of the city while living new experiences. As soon as Jeremiah arrived at his father's house, he realized that nothing would ever be the same. Wedding preparations occupy every corner of the house and hardly any other topic is discussed. Although Jeremiah is happy for his father and his fiancé, he feels overwhelmed with so much planning. Now more than ever Jeremiah needed his escapades with Sage. But she had a new friend and new plans in which Jeremiah was welcome were it not for his great aversion to change and making new friends. Suddenly Jeremiah felt alone and out of place. He had a lot of free time ahead of him and without Sage he didn't know what to do. When the opportunity to volunteer at a refugee center came up, he didn't think twice and signed up. Jeremiah was not used to stepping out of his comfort zone. He made this decision on impulse and as a last resort to save the summer and without him being fully aware, this became one of the most beautiful and impactful gestures not only in his life, but also in the lives of the people around him. Everything Together resumes the life of the Second Dad Summer community nine months later. It follows in the line of the previous one and we will be able to meet again some of its most endearing characters, but the topics it deals with are completely different. Benjamin Klas has proven to be a writer very committed to his audience. On this occasion, as it could not be otherwise, he returns to focus on social issues of great relevance and current affairs treated from a very different perspective, through feelings, our beliefs and ability to adapt. Everything Together is written in a simple and direct way. Its characters in one way or another represent a large segment of the population, making it easy to identify with. But the author also talks about complex and less everyday situations that, perhaps due to lack of information or prejudices are not well explained and transmitted to young people, which can generate even more conflicts and uncomfortable situations. Jeremiah is a sensitive, big-hearted boy who, in the midst of adolescence, has to face changes for which he is not prepared. He feels overwhelmed by the situation and doesn't know how to process his emotions. Every time he returns to his father's house for vacation, he suffers a major culture shock when he realizes that everything, he thought he knew was nothing more than unfounded preconceived ideas, and this causes him a great deal of bewilderment. Benjamin Klas' books are a door to another culturally rich reality, with very powerful characters, difficult to categorize or label, unique in their simplicity and beauty, free of prejudices and with a very open mind. This has been a very enriching read that has opened my mind and heart a little more.

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“𝑷𝒍𝒂𝒏𝒕𝒔 𝒄𝒂𝒏 𝒃𝒆 𝒍𝒊𝒌𝒆 𝒑𝒆𝒐𝒑𝒍𝒆, 𝒏𝒐𝒕 𝒎𝒖𝒄𝒉 𝒐𝒏 𝒕𝒉𝒆𝒊𝒓 𝒐𝒘𝒏 𝒃𝒖𝒕 𝒆𝒗𝒆𝒓𝒚𝒕𝒉𝒊𝒏𝒈 𝒕𝒐𝒈𝒆𝒕𝒉𝒆𝒓.” Second Dad Summer was my very first NetGalley approval and ARC, and I loved it. When I saw that a sequel called Everything Together was ready to be requested, I jumped at the opportunity. When Jeremiah spends the summer in Minneapolis with his Dad, and his Dad’s fiancé, Michael, everything feels different. There’s the mad dash to prepare for the August wedding, his best friend, Sage, now spends all her time with a new girl, and he doesn’t know where he fits in. As summer goes on, Jeremiah finds community in new places he never expected. Much like Second Dad Summer, I loved this book. It was great spending time again with characters that I already knew; Benjamin Klaus expertly weaved new characters in and quickly they became new favourites. This book (and hopefully series) continues to spend time looking at the beauty in differences, and how that beauty enriches our lives. Not only acting as a great middle school read about the LGBTQ+ community, it also touches on immigration and different cultures, which fits wonderfully with my Grade 6 Social Studies curriculum. It is the story of connection, with family, chosen family, and friend, along with the surprises life can give us when we lean into relationships and get to know people on a deeper level. I will be adding this book to my classroom, and will strongly recommend both Second Dad Summer and Everything Together to my students. Benjamin Klaus, I hope that you continue to write this series; I’m not done spending time with Jeremiah, his family, friends, and Minneapolis! Thank you to NetGalley, One Elm Books, and Red Chair Press for the ARC. “𝑰𝒇 𝒕𝒉𝒆𝒓𝒆’𝒔 𝒐𝒏𝒆 𝒕𝒉𝒊𝒏𝒈 𝑰’𝒗𝒆 𝒏𝒐𝒕𝒊𝒄𝒆𝒅 𝒂𝒃𝒐𝒖𝒕 𝒉𝒂𝒕𝒆, 𝒊𝒕’𝒔 𝒕𝒉𝒂𝒕 𝒊𝒕 𝒖𝒔𝒖𝒂𝒍𝒍𝒚 𝒄𝒐𝒎𝒆𝒔 𝒇𝒓𝒐𝒎 𝒑𝒆𝒐𝒑𝒍𝒆 𝒘𝒉𝒐 𝒂𝒓𝒆 𝒂𝒇𝒓𝒂𝒊𝒅.”

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