Racism, Not Race

Answers to Frequently Asked Questions

This title was previously available on NetGalley and is now archived.

Buy this Book on

You must sign in to see if this title is available for request.
Pub Date 07 Dec 2021 | Archive Date 16 Mar 2022

Talking about this book? Use #RacismNotRace #NetGalley. More hashtag tips!


Description

The science on race is clear. Common categories like “Black,” “white,” and “Asian” do not represent genetic differences among groups. But if race is a pernicious fiction according to natural science, it is all too significant in the day-to-day lives of racialized people across the globe. Inequities in health, wealth, and an array of other life outcomes cannot be explained without referring to “race”—but their true source is racism. What do we need to know about the pseudoscience of race in order to fight racism and fulfill human potential?

In this book, two distinguished scientists tackle common misconceptions about race, human biology, and racism. Using an accessible question-and-answer format, Joseph L. Graves Jr. and Alan H. Goodman explain the differences between social and biological notions of race. Although there are many meaningful human genetic variations, they do not map onto socially constructed racial categories. Drawing on evidence from both natural and social science, Graves and Goodman dismantle the malignant myth of gene-based racial difference. They demonstrate that the ideology of racism created races and show why the inequalities ascribed to race are in fact caused by racism.

Graves and Goodman provide persuasive and timely answers to key questions about race and racism for a moment when people of all backgrounds are striving for social justice. Racism, Not Race shows readers why antiracist principles are both just and backed by sound science.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Joseph L. Graves Jr. is professor in the Department of Biology at North Carolina A&T State University. He is a fellow of the Council of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. His books include The Emperor’s New Clothes: Biological Theories of Race at the Millennium (2001) and The Race Myth: Why We Pretend Race Exists in America (2005).

Alan H. Goodman is professor of biological anthropology at Hampshire College and a former vice president for academic affairs. He is a past president of the American Anthropological Association and codirects its public education project on race. He is a coauthor of Race: Are We So Different? (second edition, 2019), among other books.

The science on race is clear. Common categories like “Black,” “white,” and “Asian” do not represent genetic differences among groups. But if race is a pernicious fiction according to natural science...


Advance Praise

"In Racism, Not Race, Graves and Goodman lay out comprehensively and accessibly that notions of race as applied to humans are social constructs that cannot be justified in biological terms. Packed with contemporary and historical references that place race in perspective, this is a coherent and authoritative clarification of an issue that is critically important for society but is widely misunderstood despite its ever more pressing social ramifications. A valuable resource."

--Ian Tattersall, author of Troublesome Science: The Misuse of Genetics and Genomics in Understanding Race

"In Racism, Not Race, Graves and Goodman lay out comprehensively and accessibly that notions of race as applied to humans are social constructs that cannot be justified in biological terms. Packed...


Available Editions

ISBN 9780231200660
PRICE $27.95 (USD)

Available on NetGalley

NetGalley Shelf App (PDF)
Send to Kindle (PDF)
Download (PDF)

Average rating from 9 members


Featured Reviews

"Racism, Not Race" was very approachable and readable due to the fact that it was formatted in questions and answers. After taking classes on racism and anthropology in college, I've been very interested in the distinction between race as biological, social, and cultural constructs. This book directly answered those questions and was written by expert scientists in those fields.

Was this review helpful?

"Racism, Not Race" by Graves and Goodman , two outstanding scientists, was an eye-opening treatise. One of the items that was of interest is the differentiation between racism and race as the title alludes. Historical perspectives as well as current timely views are brought into focus.

There are allusions to the biological basis of race, which actually does not exist in humans and the ties that have been used to further the notion of better and worse races. All of this is explained biologically and why the actual idea of "race" does not apply to people.

The book is well-written and describes several eye-opening ideas to help academics and others understand what humans get wrong about ideas of race but how we can resist what some would claim to be a natural order of racism.. The hate of others is a pernicious trap that racists often use to excuse their feelings and try to give it a scientific rationale.

Reading this treatise really opens the eyes of the reader, assuming there is an openness to learn and change. Some readers will find fault with the ideas and maybe even the science but to this reader they would be pulling on prejudices that have become ingrained.in their psyche and are looking for excuses.

Id opine that this should be required reading at the collegiate level and maybe even in high schools, although there would be likely repercussions, certainly in some areas (maybe most) of the United States. We still have a long way to go to be inclusive and not excuse ideas that are inspired by a racism, maybe even a subliminal one.

Was this review helpful?

Readers who liked this book also liked: