Wiijiwaaganag

More Than Brothers

This title was previously available on NetGalley and is now archived.

Buy this Book on

You must sign in to see if this title is available for request.
Send NetGalley books directly to your Kindle or Kindle app

1
To read on a Kindle or Kindle app, please add kindle@netgalley.com as an approved email address to receive files in your Amazon account. Click here for step-by-step instructions.
2
Also find your Kindle email address within your Amazon account, and enter it here.
Pub Date 01 Jan 2023 | Archive Date 31 Dec 2022

Talking about this book? Use #Wiijiwaaganag #NetGalley. More hashtag tips!


Description

YA/Fiction - Niizh Eshkanag is a member of the first generation of Anishinaabe children required to attend a U.S. government boarding school—schools infamously intended to “kill the Indian and save the man,” or forcibly assimilate Native students into white culture. At the Yardley Indian Boarding School in northern Minnesota, far from his family, Niizh Eshkanag endures abuse from the school staff and is punished for speaking his native language. After his family moves him to a school that is marginally better, he meets Roger Poznanski, the principal’s white nephew, who arrives to live with his uncle’s family and attend the school. Though Roger is frightened of his Indian classmates at first, Niizh Eshkanag befriends him, and they come to appreciate and respect one another’s differences. When a younger Anishinaabe student runs away into a winter storm after being beaten by a school employee, Niizh Eshkanag and Roger join forces to rescue him, beginning an adventure that change their lives and the way settlers, immigrants and the Anishinaabe people of the Great Lakes think about each other and their shared future.

YA/Fiction - Niizh Eshkanag is a member of the first generation of Anishinaabe children required to attend a U.S. government boarding school—schools infamously intended to “kill the Indian and save...


A Note From the Publisher

Peter Razor is the author of the award-winning While the Locust Slept, a memoir chronicling his time as a ward at the State Public School in Owatonna, Minnesota, in the 1930s and the farm indenture he suffered thereafter. He is an enrolled member of the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa (Nahgahchiwanong) and a decorated Army veteran of the Korean War.

Peter Razor is the author of the award-winning While the Locust Slept, a memoir chronicling his time as a ward at the State Public School in Owatonna, Minnesota, in the 1930s and the farm indenture...


Available Editions

EDITION Other Format
ISBN 9781938065224
PRICE $29.95 (USD)
PAGES 240

Available on NetGalley

NetGalley Shelf App (PDF)
Send to Kindle (PDF)
Download (PDF)

Average rating from 16 members


Featured Reviews

As someone who has been learning more about First Nations American history, I was really intrigued to read this one. I loved the inclusion of native language as well as the inclusion of culture. This novel did highlight the racism and abuse experienced by First Nations people during the implementation of U.S. government boarding schools.

Was this review helpful?

Wiijiwaaganag focuses on two boys; the first is Niizh Eshkanag, an Anishinaabe boy forced to go to a residential school. This school will attempt to strip him of his name, language and culture. Roger is the nephew of the school principal and is going to be attending the same school. The boys quickly learn that they have many of the same values; they stand up for their classmates and have strong morals. When summer comes, Roger decides to run away to experience Niizh Eshkanag's life, much to the dismay of many White Americans in the area. The boys set off on an adventure. We see many of the problems they run into aren't because of the Anishinaabe, but the Caucasian community, who feel they need to right a wrong.

The duality of using ojibemowin and english for dialogue was a little distracting at first. But when thinking of the book's central themes, I believe it is essential to include the ojibwemowin as a matter of principle to counteract the attempts at removing the language. There was also a translational key in the back of the book, a character list, and some teacher's tools, which were all very helpful. I wish I had seen them earlier in my reading!

The writing isn't anything special. Some scenes could have been very suspenseful and exciting but fell flat. The plot, characters and setting made up for it. They were all fleshed out and felt very vivid and real. There is a lot of fantastic nature imagery during Niizh Eshkanag and Roger's adventures.

Often, in stories involving residential schools, it's all the negative experiences of the indigenous children. It's important to tell these tales as residential schools were horrendous and were swept under the rug for too long. Still, some people want to read happy books, so they aren't likely to read these types of books and learn about those experiences. Seeing a white child's positive experience with the Anishinabe group was a lovely way to shine a positive light on the indigenous culture while acknowledging and including the horrors of residential schools. Many of the problems Roger ran into were due to the Caucasian people in the community thinking that they knew what was right.

I hope people take the time to read this book. It may not be the most straightforward book to read, but it is well worth it.

I want to thank Netgalley and Michigan State University Press for an e-ARC of Wiijiwaaganag: More than Brothers in exchange for an honest review!

Was this review helpful?

The blending of English and Anishinaabemowin challenges non-native readers to enter another culture and provides native people with a story that affirms their history and culture.

Was this review helpful?

Readers who liked this book also liked: