50 Women in Technology

Pioneers and Trailblazers in STEM

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Pub Date 16 Nov 2023 | Archive Date Not set
Aurora Metro, Supernova Books

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Description

50 Women in Technology is a full-colour book celebrating female pioneers and trailblazers in STEM. It features 25 extraordinary women in history from Ada Lovelace to Emmanuelle Charpentier, as well as over 26 exclusive interviews with incredible women who are leading the way in the fast-paced world of technology today including Katalin Kariko, winner of the Nobel prize 2023 for Medicine.

PROFILES OF THE PIONEERS:

Ada Lovelace; Hertha Ayrton; Nettie Stevens; Marie Curie; Lise Meitner; Irène Joliot-Curie; Katharine Burr Blodgett; Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin; Maria Goeppert Mayer; Grace Hopper; Rita Levi-Montalcini; Chien-Shiung Wu; Hedy Lamarr; Katherine Johnson; Rosalind Franklin; Jean Jennings Bartik; Evelyn Berezin; Vera Rubin; Stephanie ‘Steve’ Shirley; Valentina Tereshkova; Sau Lan Wu; Ada Yonath; Sally Ride; Sophie Wilson and Emmanuelle Charpentier

26 Exclusive interviews with contemporary women in STEM:

Amalia Ballarino (Nuclear Engineer), Ana Oliveira (Crop Genetics), Anaïs Engelmann and Meghan Hale (Design Engineering), Anda Waluyo Sapardan (Medical Tech/Healthcare), Anna Lukasson-Herzig (Computing/AI), Brenda Romero (Video Games), Clarice Phelps (Nuclear Chemist), Claudia Brind -Woody (IT), Coty Craven (videogames/IT), Emily Holmes (Neuroscientist), Erica Kang (Cryptocurrency), Gretchen Andrew (NFT Artist), Ida Tin (FemTech), Katalin Kariko (Biochemistry), Kasia Gora (Food Tech), Maria Carolina Fujihara (Environmental Tech), Marita Cheng (Robotics), Mary Agbesanwa (FinTech), Mary Lou Jepsen (Imaging/Healthcare), Morenike Fajemisin (FemTech), Odunayo Eweniyi (Financial Tech), Rumman Chowdhury (Internet Algorithms/Data Science), Sheri Graner Ray (Videogames), Stephanie Willerth, (Bioengineering), Tan Le (Medical Tech) and Yewande Akinola (Sustainability).


50 Women in Technology is a full-colour book celebrating female pioneers and trailblazers in STEM. It features 25 extraordinary women in history from Ada Lovelace to Emmanuelle Charpentier, as well...


A Note From the Publisher

About the Authors:
Georgina Ferry is a science writer, biographer, author and broadcaster. She lives in Oxford, UK, and writes about science, and scientists past and present. Georgina writes mainly about the life sciences, then and now, and also has a particular interest in women in science, and is fascinated by the lives of scientists and their interactions with the society in which they live.

Since 2018 she has made something of a speciality of writing scientific books which include: Dorothy Hodgkin: A Life (Granta 1998); The Common Thread: A story of science, politics, ethics and the human genome with John Sulston (Bantam 2002); A computer called LEO: Lyons Teashops and the world’s first office computer (Fourth Estate 2003); Max Perutz and the Secret of Life (Chatto & Windus 2007); EMBO in perspective: A half-century in the life sciences (EMBO 2014)

Georgina Ferry – Science writer (longferry.co.uk)

Inês Almeida has a bachelor’s degree in journalism from the University of Coimbra (Portugal) and during her degree she worked at a local radio station, interviewing people from several fields, including technology. After graduating, she moved to Macau SAR (China) where she worked as a reporter at first and progressing to become editor for a local newspaper. During the six years she worked in Macau, she covered events such as an annual “Start-up Weekend” for women in technology and the launch of two new State Laboratories (one for the “Internet of Things and Smart Cities” and another for “Sciences of the Moon and Planet”). She also had the opportunity to visit the headquarters of tech giants such as Tencent and DJI in Shenzhen (China) and to interview some of the companies’ executives. In September 2021, after working in China, she moved to London to pursue a master’s degree in creative writing at the University of Roehampton which she completed, with merit, in 2023. She currently works for Aurora Metro and Supernova Books.

Bridget Greenwood is an accomplished and dynamic leader in the field of web3. The founder of The Bigger Pie, an organization that supports exceptional women in fintech and web3, and co-founder of The 200Bn Club, which aims to combat the lack of funding for female and underrepresented founders.

About the Authors:
Georgina Ferry is a science writer, biographer, author and broadcaster. She lives in Oxford, UK, and writes about science, and scientists past and present. Georgina writes mainly...


Advance Praise

“There are phenomenal women all over the technology landscape but we need to tell their stories to inspire more and to show what’s possible. Unfortunately the industry, while growing in importance has shrinking numbers of women. This is a must read.” – Martha Lane Fox, businesswoman, philanthropist and co-founder of “Last Minute”

“Women have played a fundamental part in the creation and success of the technology industry. We should all have grown up hearing their names, but unfortunately too often their contributions have not been championed. This book highlights the incredible contributions of 50 inspiring women tech pioneers, don’t miss the opportunity to find out all about them.” – Sue Black, Award winning computer scientist and digital skills expert

“There are phenomenal women all over the technology landscape but we need to tell their stories to inspire more and to show what’s possible. Unfortunately the industry, while growing in importance...


Marketing Plan

Mary Agbesanwa, one of the 26 interviewees, was at "Women of Silicon Roundabout", UK's largest tech event for women, on the 22nd of November. Feedback on her work and the book was incredible 

Megan Hale and Anais Engelmann, two design engineers interviewed for the book, were at the Women's Engineering Society Student Conference in Leeds.

Publicist campaign

Online and in person events in UK and USA

Launch in central London with women in tech groups 

Blog tour

netgalley

edelweiss +

talks in schools and colleges

Mary Agbesanwa, one of the 26 interviewees, was at "Women of Silicon Roundabout", UK's largest tech event for women, on the 22nd of November. Feedback on her work and the book was incredible 

Megan...


Available Editions

EDITION Paperback
ISBN 9781913641320
PRICE £19.99 (GBP)
PAGES 256

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Featured Reviews

As a woman who works in STEM, I was really looking forward to reading this book. It did not disappoint. A breakdown of the last 75 years of scientific advancement opened the book, sorted chronologically. Then It focused on women who were pioneers in technology, starting with Ada Lovelace. The last section was about modern women in technology, and was really interesting. Even as someone who works in STEM, I learned a lot and there are women I intend to look into further.

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Celebrating trailblazers past and present, this book pays tribute to pioneering women in STEM fields. It profiles 25 historical innovators like Ada Lovelace while also featuring over 26 exclusive interviews with today's extraordinary women driving advancements in technology.

This book is engaging, informative, and easy to read. The interviews will be especially interesting for students interested in a STEM career.

Thanks, NetGalley, for the ARC I received. This is my honest and voluntary review.

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Ines Almeida, Georgina Ferry, Bridget Greenwood, 50 Women in Technology Pioneers and Trailblazers in STEM, Aurora Metro Supernova Books, November 2023.

Thank you, NetGalley, for providing me with this uncorrected proof for review.

As I have kindle download, I am unable to comment on the full colour nature of the book. However, I am pleased to be able to comment on the text of this most useful work. In particular, the combination of the stories of early women in technology, and those of today; discussion of unequal pay in the sciences; the excellent section on depiction of scientists in school studies and popular culture; and the writers’ experience imparts the information with heft as well as being accessible read.

More well-known names such as Ada Lovelace, Marie Curie, Hedy Lamarr are represented. However, they are joined by women who, although known in scientific circles have not entered popular culture about women in technology. Bridget Greenwood’s foreword sets out the purpose of this book – to enhance public knowledge of the women pioneers in technology. She suggests that the change that has been effected, is only a start, that more needs to be done to encourage women into technology and to keep them there. Quotations from uncorrected proofs cannot be included in reviews, so it is impossible to replicate some of the pithy and inspirational propositions included throughout the book – both from its editors and the women they to whom they give a voice. Suffice to say, they make an effective voice for these women.

Today’s women in technology, such as Emily Holmes (a psychologist working on mental imagery); Ida Tin, the CEO of Clue (a menstruation tracking app); Marita Cheng (Young Australian of the Year 2012); and Stephanie Willwerth who runs an interdisciplinary program at the University of Victoria, provide some wonderful interviews. Please note that these descriptions are brief and cannot convey the value of their work and discussion s of that work.

There are some fascinating photos – it is impossible to go past those of the mainframe computers from the 1950s even if they are familiar. Similarly, the Bletchley Park story is familiar – at least in its broad-brush strokes. Here there is detail, not only about the women’s work and their aptitude, but the fight to achieve anything like parity with men in occupations, wages and status. The book ends with a comprehensive index.

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Thanks to NetGalley for letting me read this.
While it seems to be geared toward teen girls, I think almost anyone could benefit from reading this. You can get more out of this book by reading a bit at a time because there are so many discrete stories about individual women. Frankly, I would read a couple of stories and close the book because I was annoyed that once again the women who did just as much on a scientific project got zero credit.
However, this book doesn't stop there. Besides the women in history, there are stories about contemporary women who are important in scientific fields and making real changes.
Both the historical women and the contemporary women had brief biographies, but the contemporary women also answered questions about their lives, such as what they are proud of and whether they have any regrets.
Reading through some of their projects gave me hope for the world, as their quite brilliant minds are being applied to real world problems that concern me.

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Awesome inspiration to read about women in technology, science and astronomy of past and present. I enjoyed reading the stories and interviews which represented great achievements of women in different industries, research and innovation fields. This book can teach curiosity and believing in yourself, working through milestones and celebrating wins.

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