Trippy

The Peril and Promise of Medicinal Psychedelics

You must sign in to see if this title is available for request. Sign In or Register Now
Send NetGalley books directly to your Kindle or Kindle app

1
To read on a Kindle or Kindle app, please add kindle@netgalley.com as an approved email address to receive files in your Amazon account. Click here for step-by-step instructions.
2
Also find your Kindle email address within your Amazon account, and enter it here.
Pub Date May 07 2024 | Archive Date Jul 06 2024

Talking about this book? Use #Trippy #NetGalley. More hashtag tips!


Description

A riveting look at the tremendous promise and inherent risks of the use of psychedelics in mental health treatment through the lens of a New York Times reporter whose journalistic exploration of this emerging field began with a personal crisis.

When he signed up for a psychedelic retreat run by a mysterious Argentine woman deep in Brazil’s rainforest in early 2018, Ernesto Londoño, a veteran New York Times journalist, was so depressed he had come close to jumping off his terrace weeks earlier. His nine-day visit to Spirit Vine Ayahuasca Retreat Center included four nighttime ceremonies during which participants imbibed a vomit-inducing plant-based brew that contained DMT, a powerful mind-altering compound.

The ayahuasca trips provided Londoño an instant reprieve from his depression and became the genesis of a personal transformation that anchors this sweeping journalistic exploration of the booming field of medicinal psychedelics. Londoño introduces readers to a dazzling array of psychedelic enthusiasts who are upending our understanding of trauma and healing. They include Indigenous elders who regard psychedelics as portals to the spirit world; religious leaders who use mind-bending substances as sacraments; war veterans suffering from PTSD who credit psychedelics with changing their lives; and clinicians trying to resurrect a promising field of medicine hastily abandoned in the 1970s as the United States declared a War on Drugs.

Londoño’s riveting personal narrative pulls the reader through a deeply researched and brilliantly reported account of a game-changing industry on the rise. Trippy is the definitive book on psychedelics and mental health today, and Londoño’s in-depth and nuanced look at this shifting landscape will be pivotal in guiding policymakers and readers as they make sense of the perils, limitations, and promises of turning to psychedelics in the pursuit of healing.

A riveting look at the tremendous promise and inherent risks of the use of psychedelics in mental health treatment through the lens of a New York Times reporter whose journalistic exploration of this...


Advance Praise

"New York Times correspondent Londoño debuts with an arresting survey of the “medicinal psychedelic field” and where it’s headed...a scrupulous study of a fascinating development in mental health care."

Publishers Weekly, starred review

"New York Times correspondent Londoño debuts with an arresting survey of the “medicinal psychedelic field” and where it’s headed...a scrupulous study of a fascinating development in mental health...


Available Editions

EDITION Other Format
ISBN 9781250878540
PRICE $29.99 (USD)
PAGES 320

Available on NetGalley

NetGalley Shelf App (EPUB)
Send to Kindle (EPUB)
Download (EPUB)

Average rating from 32 members


Featured Reviews

My thanks to both NetGalley and the publisher Celadon Books for an advanced copy of this book that is both a memoir about depression and the new treatments that are being adapted to fight this scourge, by looking to old ways, and new chemical compounds.

Ask anyone today how they are doing and a surprising amount of people will answer not well. The economy, politics, social media, employment or lack of, everything and everyone seems off. I know I have. Depression has been something I have always dealt with, meaning that it has always been there, has controlled me in many ways, destroyed relationships and made me an unpleasant person, ie a bore to be around. I have tried different things, but none of theme took. Talk therapy never clicked, and prescriptions always gave me the side effects, never a good effect. Over the last few years I have quite about psychedelics and treatment for a variety of mental issues. Some sound too good to be true, some sound, eh maybe maybe not. There is a bit of hucksterism, to it, psychedelics will change depression therapy, like bitcoin will change currency and social media will make us all come together. Trippy by Ernesto Londoño, a war correspondent, New York Times reporter and self-confessed unhappy person, has given me something this other books really didn't. Hope.

Ernesto Londoño, at the opening of this book is at the top of his game. A war correspondent, op-ed writer, now made chief of Brazil Bureau for the New York Times, Londoño seems to have it all, but is literally teetering at the edge, thinking thoughts of self-harm, and self-loathing. Londoño's life seems empty and meaningless, even with a recently adopted dog. Londoño decides to take part in a ayahuasca ceremony, something he can cover for the Times, and see what all the fuss was about. Ayahuasca is a psychoactive brew, that has become the new cure all for finding one's self, and even more finding where the mind is hurt, and aid in curing it. Londoño is amazed to find out that it helps, exposing feelings, hates, and disappointments that he never even knew, and after a few more treatments radically changes his life. Londoño begins to investigate this lucrative, controversial field, discussing the many dangers psychedelic tourism can offer, from being sold stuff, to sex predators. Londoño also looks at America and the changes that are happening in laws and even thinking, helping veterans deal with PTSD, with a high success rate.

The book is written as a memoir and an investigation into the world of psychedelic treatment, and really is a stunning read. Londoño holds nothing back about himself, his past, his sexuality, and his fears and life. One can tell that this treatment, not only changed his life, but changed Londoño entire outlook on life, people and understanding. The personal, explaining his treatments, what he saw, sharing how it changed really gives a focus to what these medicines can do for people. And his examination of the scammers and predators are even more important, and makes one wish that American healthcare and insurers get on the ball, and make this treatment more available. Which is an impossible dream, I know. Something that I had never thought of either is the stigma that is still present dealing with depression, PTSD, and treatment like this. There are many mentions of future employers, or government contractors looking at one's history and going, yeah you got problems, wait your went where for what, isn't that illegal, no thank you. For these people Londoño included to come out, is a real act of bravery, and probably of better mental feelings.

To read about Londoño being so miserable, and so trapped by feelings he didn't even know he had, and getting to the last chapter and seeing what lays ahead for this freed soul is really wonderful. A fascinating and touching book. I'm so glad this has helped Londoño, and I want to thank him for sharing his tale, for this has given me a bit of hope that even I can change.

Was this review helpful?

Readers who liked this book also liked: