The Jewish Resistance

Uprisings against the Nazis in World War II

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Pub Date 11 Jul 2017 | Archive Date 25 Mar 2018

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Description

Threatened with extermination, many Jewish people refused to go passively to their deaths at the hands of the Nazis during World War II and instead put up heroic resistance. Prisoners at Sobibór and Treblinka organized successful revolts, while at Auschwitz they sacrificed their lives to dynamite the crematorium.

Beyond the barbed wire of the camps, hundreds of Jewish people were active in the French resistance and thousands fought with partisans in other occupied countries. One and a half million more served in the Allied armed forces. Incredibly, it took the Nazis longer to subdue the forces of the Warsaw ghetto than it had taken them to defeat the Polish army in 1939. This book reveals a little-known chapter of history and uncovers many stories of amazing courage in the face of overwhelming odds.

Threatened with extermination, many Jewish people refused to go passively to their deaths at the hands of the Nazis during World War II and instead put up heroic resistance. Prisoners at Sobibór and...


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Featured Reviews

The myth that Jews walked like calves to the slaughter without fighting back is just that -- a myth. Here, Roland documents various acts of resistance and rebellion from Berlin to Brussels to Algeria to Minsk and Sobibor. At times, it's a taste of Inglorious Bastards with the armed resistance planting secret bombs and conducting midnight raids. Other times, the rebellions were acts of utter desperation, weaponless, against an Army that had overrun all of Western Europe in just a few short weeks. In the Warsaw ghetto, as Leon Uris chronicled in Mila 18, held out against the Third Reich far longer than the entire Polish Army had and with far fewer weapons and no help from their Polish neighbors who betrayed them every chance they got. Roland tells this story - or these various stories - in an easy-to-read manner, but it doesn't lack for details and doesn't lack for bravery against all odds.

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