Plantagenet Princess, Tudor Queen

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Pub Date 06 Aug 2015 | Archive Date 28 Feb 2019

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Description

She was the mother of Henry VIII and wife of Henry VII, but who was Elizabeth of York? Raised as the precious eldest child of Edward IV, Elizabeth had every reason to expect a bright future until Edward died, and her life fell apart.

When Elizabeth's uncle became Richard III, she was forced to choose sides. Should she trust her father's brother and most loyal supporter or honor the betrothal that her mother has made for her to her family's enemy, Henry Tudor?

The choice was made for her on the field at Bosworth, and Elizabeth the Plantagenet princess became the first Tudor queen.

Did Elizabeth find happiness with Henry? And did she ever discover the truth about her missing brothers, who became better known as the Princes in the Tower?

Lose yourself in Elizabeth's world in Plantagenet Princess Tudor Queen.

This novel has been selected by the Historical Novel Society as an Editors' Choice and long-listed for the 2016 HNS Indie Award.

She was the mother of Henry VIII and wife of Henry VII, but who was Elizabeth of York? Raised as the precious eldest child of Edward IV, Elizabeth had every reason to expect a bright future until...


Advance Praise

"Wilcoxson makes Elizabeth an invitingly sympathetic character, and the novel’s portrait of Henry VII is truly remarkable for its humanity, a quality of his Tudor novelists often omit." - Historical Novel Society

"Wilcoxson makes Elizabeth an invitingly sympathetic character, and the novel’s portrait of Henry VII is truly remarkable for its humanity, a quality of his Tudor novelists often omit." - Historical...


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ISBN 9781511803311
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Featured Reviews

Such a good book!! Samantha is a great writer and I usually enjoy all of her books, but this one was superb. Elizabeth of York is a true Queen.

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Plantagenet Princess, Tudor Queen: The Story Elizabeth of York is my introduction to Samantha Wilcoxson and her work. I loved reading Elizabeth’s story and the author’s vivid details and descriptions of the people, setting and time period. It is obvious she did her research. I enjoyed seeing how Elizabeth lived in that turmoil she went through. Plantagenet Princess, Tudor Queen is one of my favorite Tudor era books I have read. I look forward to more by this author in the future. Highly recommended. 5+ stars.

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This was a wonderfully detailed book. I was hooked from the first page! I thoroughly enjoyed the unique writing style I voluntarily read and reviewed a copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own

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This was my first time reading from this author. Very interesting subject, Elizabeth of York and about the War of Roses. S

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I really enjoyed this book. Well researched and it was great to that it did not show HenryVII as the total villain many books make him out to be. Perfect for any lover of Tudor history of the war of the roses

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Truly well written, well researched historical fiction about Elizabeth of York. As the mother of Henry VIII, Elizabeth was exposed to the heartless War of the Roses, pitting cousin against cousin for control of the English throne. A strong woman, Elizabeth lived her life mostly on her own terms, despite the controlling men in her life.

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I received an ARC of this book from NetGalley. I completely adored it. I am always fascinated by the inner workings of court life. Secret notes, alliances, marriage contracts. This book had it all. I love Tudor life so to read the story of Henry VIII's mother and her journey was incredible.

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An excellent novel of the life of Elizabeth of York, daughter of Edward IV, niece of Richard III, wife of Henry VII, and mother of Henry VIII. She was the visible embodiment of the end of the War of the Roses. I liked that it was a novel instead of a biography because it made the people more alive. It read quickly and was just delightful.

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Overall I enjoyed this tale, which was historically pretty accurate (with a few fictional stretches by the author that could not be proved either way). Elizabeth was a Plantagenet princess, living in sanctuary with her mother as the Tudors tried to take over the throne from Richard III. After the Battle of Bosworth, Henry Tudor becomes king and Elizabeth is betrothed to marry their erstwhile enemy, in the name of uniting the houses of York and Lancaster. Her mother, and mother in law, are incredibly strong women, and Elizabeth comes over initially as a meek and pliable princess, but eventually she does build her confidence and makes her marriage work, although she can never quite shake off her suspicions about who was responsible for the deaths of her brothers - the Princes in the Tower. The story is well told, with one exception. It is clear the author is American, as a number of Americanisms sneak into the text - for example 'fall' instead of 'autumn' is used several times, along with a number of anachronisms that would not have been used in speech in the fourteenth century, nor would they have been understood. This is a shame, as it jars the reader out of the story. Over all the story is good, and the poetic licence doesn't really stray from one might have been, even if it's rather unlikely to be real, such as Elizabeth's relationship with her uncle Richard. You are drawn into their lives, and feel part of the early Tudor court. The author obviously can't resist giving young Henry (VIII) some characteristics that were well documented in his later life - again, it's impossible to dispute at this distance. The fact that we know what happens to the characters doesn't detract from the tale - it is sensitively written and very readable. Thank you to NetGalley and BooksGoSocial for allowing me access to the ARC in exchange for an honest review.

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Thankyou to NetGalley, BooksGoSocial and the author, Samantha J Wilcoxson, for the opportunity to read a digital copy of Plantagenet Princess, Tudor Queen in exchange for an honest and unbiased opinion. I love this era of history, which is the reason I jumped at the chance to review this book. I had not come across this author before, so I was quite interested to see how she would go. I thought the book was very well written. The atmosphere, the historical characters, the scenery! I felt like I had been transported back in time and was watching the life of Elizabeth of York unfold. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and will be keeping a watchful eye out for more from this author. 4.5 stars. Well worth a read.

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Plantagenet Princess, Tudor Queen, Samantha J Wilcoxson Review from Jeannie Zelos book reviews Genre: Historical fiction Sometimes I want a break from Romance, from Fantasy, and then I take a dip back in history. With these reads, as with most fiction I enjoy, I need to feel that events could have been real,. I hopefully get drawn into the story so I'm almost part of it, instead of a detached observer. This story did all that and more, I really felt for the characters, wondered about events, even knowing British history so I had an idea of what would happen. Samantha has stuck broadly to facts well known, but put her own interpretation on them. Thus all UK kids learn about King Richard putting his nephews into the Tower and that they disappeared, but we never really know, even now, if they died, escaped, were murdered, and if so by whom. Samantha has an interesting and plausible take on that. The Tudors – books generally focus on Henry V111, but we're a bit earlier here, starting with his mother and her story from childhood. We see firsthand ( well, fictionally first hand) the trials her family went through, princesses in hiding, then out in the open and then frequently back in hiding or in Sanctuary for their safety. It was a tumultuous period, with different factions vying for the throne, each gathering their own support and some pretty bloody battles. Families were never really secure, knowing that through battle they could be deposed at any time... I enjoyed seeing Elizabeth grow, marry, have children and seeing figures I know as adults in history, Henry and Arthur, it was interesting seeing them as children. I enjoy reading about lesser known figures from history such as Elizabeth, and the childhoods of more well known people. An excellent read, had me swept up in the story, worrying for the families, and feeling sad for the girls who were married off as political pawns, and the boys who faced imprisonment or execution if there was a change of king. Tough times to be Royals. Stars: five, a great historical read, that drew me in and made me feel “there” with the characters. Arc via Netgalley and publishers

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Historical fiction is an ever popular genre and in the last 20 years it can be argued, certainly in the UK that it has reached its zenith with such writers as Hilary Mantel, C J Sansom and Alison Weir. Combining known facts, the author's interpretation of the facts together with the imagining of what might have happened and have been said, done well it will give the reader both an entertaining read and an increase level of knowledge that they may now use to seek out further information of the subject and characters portrayed. A welcome addition to this genre is the American writer Samantha J Wilcoxson who has produced a series of books in the The Plantagenet Embers series. In the Plantagenet Princess, Tudor Queen the author looks at the life of Elizabeth of York whose marriage to Henry Tudor was instrumental in uniting the country and ending the War of the Roses that had torn the nation apart. This is to say the least a complicated story with the continual fighting for supremacy between the Houses of York and Lancaster together with internal fighting within the respective Houses and the continual shifting of the loyalties of noblemen between them. However the author will navigate the reader through this tortuous tale of ever changing alliances and Machiavellian intrigue. It must be said that the central premise of the book regarding the identity of the person chiefly responsible for the murder and disappearance of the "Princess in the Tower" goes against the general presumption that they were killed by King Richard but there is enough doubt and ambiguity to add credence to other claims. Although of course it is the author who propagates their theory into their fictional account of true events it is ultimately up to the reader to check other sources and come to their own conclusion. The style of writing is certainly most readable and this book is an entertaining read from beginning to end and it is clear that a considerable amount of research would have been undertaken. Without doubt after reading this book one is most tempted to seek out other historical fiction titles that have been penned by this author.

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PLANTAGANET PRINCESS, TUDOR QUEEN by SAMANTHA WILCOXSON is an historical novel in which the author has rounded out the characters' personalities without in any way changing the historical truth. The story is very well told and the characters are believable. It is obvious that the author has done a great deal of research into the life of Queen Elizabeth, the first Tudor queen, and she is seen here as a devoted and loyal wife to the man she never wanted to marry, a loving mother, sister and friend. She was the daughter of a king, but was humble and caring, not wanting to draw attention to herself although she was incredibly beautiful. She was by nature a peacemaker. We see what life was like in fifteenth century England, with, not only the poverty of the lower class, but also the dangers of having royal blood and the lack of freedom for those who were otherwise privileged. It was a world of conspiracy, war and bloodshed, plague and death, into which Elizabeth brought her children. For anyone who enjoys historical fiction this book is a must read! I was given a free copy of the book by NetGalley from BooksGoSocial. The opinions in this review are completely my own.

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4 stars This is a great book about Elizabeth Woodeville (eldest daughter of King Edward IV), a Plantagenet princess who becomes the wife of King Henry VII. Elizabeth has decided to put aside the hurts of her past, the deaths of her father Edward IV, brothers, and other relatives to marry Henry Tudor who some think doesn't deserve the throne. There are those who feel that since he had very little “real” royal blood, he didn't deserve the throne and those who believed that since he won the throne on the battlefield he was not fit to become king. But Henry and Elizabeth surprisingly turn out to have a loving and devoted marriage and Elizabeth comes to love him in spite of the rumors and turmoil that surrounds the his reign. The book shows that Elizabeth's mother, another Elizabeth, was a scheming and volatile woman. It shows a side of Henry that I hadn't read about before. Or perhaps I never considered it, but have read that they had a loving relationship. Henry's mother Margaret Beaufort was a very controlling woman and managed to get her own way most of the time. While the book mainly focuses of Elizabeth, the reader meets many other people in Elizabeth's life: Henry, her cousins, her sister Cecily, her mother and her father and other relatives and those who played a major part in the War of the Roses. We see Elizabeth grow from a naive and too trusting girl to a woman not only of incredible beauty, but she matured to have a remarkable sense of self possession. The book also discusses the War of the Roses and its major players and how the Plantagenet's played a part. It discusses how Henry finally triumphed over the unrest and put an end to the War of the Roses. Another underlying theme is what happened to the princes in the tower. It has long been speculated that Elizabeth's uncle King Richard III had them put to death, but the evidence has not yet been uncovered to prove that. Perhaps it never will be and this shall remain one of the unsolved mysteries of history. Ms. Wilcoxson has certainly done extensive research in writing this book. The descriptions she draws with words are clear and beautifully drawn. It is a very easy and enjoyable read. This is my first Samantha Wilcoxson novel for I have relied mostly on Alison Weir and Hilary Mantle for my readings about the Tudor period. It won't however, be my last. I immediately went to Amazon to look for other books of hers and was pleased to see that this book is one of a series. I want to thank NetGalley and BooksGoSocial for forwarding to me a copy of this most enjoyable book for me to read, enjoy and review.

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Princess Fuzzypants here: Elizabeth of York is one of the most fascinating women in a time ripe with fascinating men and women. First she is the daughter of a King, Edward IV and then the niece of a King, Richard III. As fond as she is of Richard, even she has doubts whether he might have if not murdered at least ordered the murder of her two younger brothers. The Plantagenet family had been tearing each other part during the War of the Roses seemingly with no end in sight. After Henry Tudor defeated Richard, he becomes King with an even more tenuous grasp on direct lineage than many others. Elizabeth is the best possible solution for the divisions as the daughter of York but wife of Lancaster, forming the new line of Tudor. She expected little from her marriage and the love that grew between them surprised them both. This was not to say there were many times when they were in conflict, none so great as when Henry felt forced into dealing harshly with her extended family members. She had suspicion throughout her life that he might have had a hand in the execution of her brothers. Yet, despite rifts that might have torn them apart, they seemed to be able to reconnect, even when she went on an arduous journey while pregnant. She desired to know the truth and she did discover it although neither Henry nor his malevolent mother would know. A kindly and thoughtful woman of great beauty both inside and out, the people loved her and she softened Henry. She was the matriarch of the Tudor Dynasty. They lost much when they lost her. The book provides a fair glimpse into the characters who moulded history, painting with many colours and lots of shades. No one is black or white and there is an empathy for the people who often had to wend their way through treacherous waters, often just trying to survive. As much as a historical fiction can, it gives an insight into the humans whom we seek to understand. I give it five purrs and two paws up.

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Plantagenet Princess, Tudor Queen is easy to read historical fiction about Elizabeth of York, mother to Henry VIII. She's not often the subject of historical fiction, being somewhat sublimated to her famous son, but she's worth a book, and the book is worth a read! Plantagenet Princess, Tudor Queen starts when Elizabeth is very small (around 4 years old) and covers her entire life.. the war of the roses, the famous battle on Bosworth Field, the birth of her children, her marriage, everything. It's well written and an enjoyable read.

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This is a story about Elizabeth of York and how she became Queen. It is beautifully told. I highly recommend this book to fans of historical fiction. I would like to thank Netgalley and the publisher for providing me with a copy of this book free of charge. This is my honest and unbiased opinion of it.

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This is well-written historical fiction, suitable for both young and older readers. It does a good job of humanizing a period of history that can feel very far removed from us today. It describes the life of Elizabeth of York, princess and queen of the late 1400s, member of the waning Plantagenet royal family, and eventually wife and mother of the emerging Tudor house. I felt so indignant at some of the aspects of life that these people took for granted... the battles, the executions to prevent other claimants to the throne, the idea that kings ruled by divine right and had the right to play God with the lives of their subjects...but me taking umbrage at all that and still managing to have a sympathy for the woman who feels she has to submit to all of it, was how I knew the book was well written.

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First, thanks to NetGalley for the chance to read this historical fiction novel. Based on the true life of Elizabeth of York, the author delivers an interesting fictionalized account of her life from childhood to death. She was the mother of Henry the 8th, and the wife of Henry the 7th, both very strong characters yet, Elizabeth, to me, is the more interesting of the bunch. How did she end up loving her enemy? What kind of woman was she to Henry? Read this book and find out! I recommend this book for lovers of all things Tudor, like I am. Easy to read and a good introduction to the family. Tally Ho!

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This book covers a LOT of history, and the author did a great job of pulling together the entire story of Elizabeth of York. I really enjoyed this book. The story moved along at a good pace, and the characterizations were well done.

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Historical fiction is quickly becoming a favorite genre for me, with books like this one paving the way. While Plantagenet Princess was released back in 2015, I only recently became aware of it, and the author. In this novel you follow the life of Princess Elizabeth of York. Now if you have a hard time keeping all of the Elizabeths' and Edwards' and Henrys' of old England straight, join the club. Going into this I had a vague about WHO I was going to be reading about, and I try not to do any research beforehand so I can get a feel of the fiction part without having that nagging voice that says "Thats not what happened!" This book is a fairly easy read, and Samantha adds in small details to make it clear who the main character is referencing when so many people of the same name exist. The only thing that made me stop reading on occasion was the P.O.V. changes. They were occasionally abrupt, and made me have to reread it for clarity. I do have to say that the author has a way with surprises. There were several times in the book where I reread the paragraph because I could not believe what I had just read. I am excited to continue my journey into historical fiction with some more of Samanthas' work.

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I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not regurgitate the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it. She was the mother of Henry VIII and wife of Henry VII, but who was Elizabeth of York? Raised as the precious eldest child of Edward IV, Elizabeth had every reason to expect a bright future until Edward died, and her life fell apart. When Elizabeth's uncle became Richard III, she was forced to choose sides. Should she trust her father's brother and most loyal supporter or honour the betrothal that her mother has made for her to her family's enemy, Henry Tudor? The choice was made for her on the field at Bosworth, and Elizabeth the Plantagenet princess became the first Tudor queen. Did Elizabeth find happiness with Henry? And did she ever discover the truth about her missing brothers, who became better known as the Princes in the Tower? Lose yourself in Elizabeth's world in Plantagenet Princess Tudor Queen. This novel has been selected by the Historical Novel Society as an Editors' Choice and long-listed for the 2016 HNS Indie Award. As a book that I have already read, I was delighted to see this available for me to share my review! Elizabeth was a fascinating person and so much is known (and unknown) about her and her place in history is deeply cemented. To go from being a Plantagenet to a Tudor was not just a question of marriage, it was a question of allegiance and leaving loved ones behind as you are now the enemy. As a lover of history, we chose this for our next biography book club and I highly recommend that you read this book alone or as part of a group as it is a fascinating look into the past and at a brave, amazing woman. Maybe she should have raised Henry VIII to be less of a jerk and womanizer, but, hey, he was the King and Kings can do what they want. As always, I try to find a reason to not rate with stars as I love emojis (outside of their incessant use on Instagram and Twitter) so let's give it 👸👸👸👸👸

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I'm obsessed with all things royal history. So this book spoke to me immedaitely. I didn't know much about Henry VIII's family (his mother and father basically). Thsi book delves into the relationship between Elizabeth and Henry from the beginning when he took the crown from Richard. Even though thrown together for political purposes, Elizaveth came to love her husband, even while grieving her former love Richard and her possibly murdered brothers in the tower. The book moved quickly through Elizabeth's life, and even touched on maybe a little bit of post partum depression after one of her children are born. It shows her trying to remover herself from her mother's shadown and also fight for attention with her new husbands mother, who continued to grasp for power. It also touches on Henry growing up. It read like an exciting history book, and I lvoed learning more.

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Plantagenet Princess, Tudor Queen by Samantha Wilcoxson is specifically about the life of Elizabeth of York. This is a fabulous novel depicting the "under-the radar" details of a lesser-known important character in English History. The Daughter of Edward IV, niece to Richard III (and most likely perhaps more, however we will never truly know HOW much more), wife of Hendry VII (Henry Tudor), and mother to Henry VIII. A pivotal character in history, yet glossed over for her famous male counterparts. Wilcoxson does an excellent job making sure that this fictional novel of her life is as historically accurate as possible and gives readers a glimpse of how difficult and trying her life truly was. One has to sympathize in regards to the many losses she experienced (the Princes in the Tower), loss of her parents, her uncle (first love?), and the difficult marriage she was forced to consent to with Henry Tudor (and dealing with his overbearing mother Lady Margaret Beaufort, and the loss of 2 children (not including the last child that ended in the death of Elizabeth herself. One has to be inspired by her perseverance in all that she lived through and overcame. The author paints this picture perfectly and encourages the reader to dive in and search out more information in regards to WOR and the Tudor dynasty. I give this book 5 stars. Thank you NetGalley for allowing me to read this book in return for an honest review.

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I have read a few books about this period but there are few about Elizabeth. I enjoyed it and looked forward to getting time to read it. The only slight criticism was some American words and terms which seemed odd in an English historical novel . Elizabeth had a difficult,complex life in a volatile period of history. She seemed to have to hide her feelings and fears and although Henry loved her she did not trust him. The novel was very good at depicting the underlying terror and how the princesses were used as currency. Great read

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Tons of research are evident in Ms Wilcoxson's novel and once wrapped in the storyline, one truly cannot tell fact from fiction. So good at blending the two together here in this interesting novel. It was great to hear of characters other than the norm that one usually knows about from history. While I like the book, a few times I found myself skimming ahead just to get through the page filled with description, rarely were there any lulls, it flowed well and kept pace. Overall I do recomend it. Thank you to the publishers for letting me read an advance copy in exchange for a review.

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I've always been a Henry VIII fan and read most everything I can find on his era. This book enlarges the view of the Tudor reign with focus on Elizabeth, wife of Henry VII and mother of Henry VIII. This was such a glorious, yet treacherous time in history that it's easy to become spellbound by Samantha Wilcoxson's writing style. She builds each character, using history for the bones and fleshing out using the history of the times. Every piece of the story is easily "seen" and while you know the outcome, the story is still fascinating enough to keep your interest. I read this over a long weekend and found myself neglecting my "to do" list until I'd finished the book.

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Elizabeth of York was the daughter of Edward IV, niece of Richard III, wife of Henry VII, and mother of Henry VIII, Margaret, Queen of Scotland, and Mary, Queen of France. But what was she like as a person? In Plantagenet Princess, Tudor Queen: The Story of Elizabeth of York, Samantha Wilcoxson brings the matriarch of the Tudor Dynasty to life for readers of historical fiction. I continue to be fascinated with the Tudors and Tudor era of history, so it isn’t surprising that this novel immediately appealed to me even before I read its description. Not having read a book that focused on Elizabeth of York made this an even bigger must-read for me. The story is told in two sections: Part I–Plantagenet Princess and Part II–Tudor Queen. The one constant throughout both sections of the book was intrigue, particularly involving what happened to the Princes in the Tower (Elizabeth’s brothers Edward and Richard) who vanished and were presumed murdered—a mystery that continues to endure centuries later. (I enjoyed the author’s imagining of what happened to the Princes, by the way. The timing of the ‘revelation’ was perfect!) Another constant was the conflict Elizabeth often feels regarding Henry’s actions to retain the throne. It was so easy to put myself in Elizabeth’s shoes and imagine how torn she must feel over her loyalties to her family and her husband, and being forced to choose between them time and again. Wilcoxson’s writing is fantastic, and I adored the descriptions of events happening within the Tudor Court, and the various locations or general surroundings Elizabeth found herself in. Dialogue between characters was easy to follow and consistent, and Elizabeth’s inner thoughts made perfect sense in relation to the conversation at hand. These aren’t things I’d ordinarily make a point of mentioning in a review, but as these things were greatly lacking in something I recently reviewed, it stood out to me while reading this book. This is the first book in the Plantagenet Embers series. I’m currently reading book two, Faithful Traitor: The Story of Margaret Pole, which I’ll be reviewing sometime later this month. Based on what I’ve read so far? It’s a sure bet I’ve found a new historical fiction author to follow. Hooray! I’m definitely recommending this book to historical fiction fans. I received an advance reading copy of this book courtesy of BooksGoSocial via Netgalley.

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This is a fascinating look behind the scenes at a particularly poignant time in English history. The Wars of the Roses devastated England/the United Kingdom for a ridiculously long time; the marriage of Elizabeth Plantagenet (House of York) to Henry Tudor (House of Lancaster) was unprecedented and unexpected and unconventional to say the least. It was also lovely to read about... With a marvelous eye for historical detail and a lyrical storytelling style, Wilcoxson has taken this particular moment in history and brought it to life. The characters are well developed and spring to life off the page. The history is compelling and presented with just the right touch of mystery to keep readers engaged. This was a thoroughly enjoyable book!

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I really enjoyed this book, it’s well researched and well written. Full of information this life of Elizabeth of York brings to life the tumultuous times in which she lived. A great addition to a historians library.

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Tudor fiction is one of my favorite subjects, and Wilcoxson's history of Queen Elizabeth is no exception.

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Elizabeth of York was the daughter, niece, sister, wife, and mother of kings. However, her story has often been overlooked in famous of her son’s tragic wives. This novel is written well-written and humanizes Elizabeth as both a victim and survivor. I recommend this for fans of Alison Weir, C. W. Gortner, and Philippa Gregory.

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It's historical fiction let's not forget that, but Wilcoxsom manages nevertheless to lay down an entertaining book based on historical facts. It's not a surprise the big lines of the story is known to those who love British history and therefore offers none to hardly any big surprises. BUT this book is recommendable since it will entertain and keep you reading.

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This was such a good book. I love historical storie and even more so when the author has done a lot of research in the development of the story. Not only is this really easy to read, I loved that there were then parts that I could look up and learn more about. Highly recommended!

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I enjoyed this book I really felt I was there perfect for fans of Alison Weir and Elizabeth chadwick

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I am a lover of Tudor history so my expectations were high in this book and I was not dissapointed. The author had researched her subject well and this clearly showed. Very interesting facts of which I was unaware with the War of the Roses. I would recommend this to anyone who enjoys Tudor hstory.

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*Many thanks to Samantha J Wilcoxon, BooksGoSocial and NetGalley for arc in exchange for my honest review.* Elizabeth, just like her mother-in-law, was always in the shadow of her husband and children, fortunately this well-researched and well-written novel gives her the credit well-deserved. Highly recommended to all fans of historical fiction.

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A fascinating story and well researched. Have read Samantha Wilcoxson books before and love the detail. Can't wait to read the next one. Thank you NetGalley

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This was excellent book about Elizabeth of York. She trusted her uncle Richard III and was key in legitimizing Henry VII's reign. She loved her brothers and did not know who she could trust with not only their safe being, but whether they were even alive still. She was pulled by the politics of the time, but became the mother of the Tudor dynasty.

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