A Coin for the Ferryman

A Novel

Narrated by Mark Ashby
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Pub Date 01 Mar 2022 | Archive Date Not set

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Description

He came. He saw. She conquered.

In 1999, an elite interdisciplinary team headed by Nobel laureate Andrew Danicek gathered in California to carry out a ground-breaking time-travel experiment. While the rest of the world remained unaware, Julius Caesar was successfully transported from his last Ides of March to a specially-constructed covert facility. Four days of conversation with historians and Latin scholars were planned, followed by Caesar’s return to the moment from which he was extracted, thus keeping subsequent history intact. But despite the team’s meticulous efforts to plan for all possible exigencies, an unscrupulous antiquities dealer who learns of Caesar’s visit disrupts the experiment with a kidnap attempt. Cassandra Fleury, the youngest member of the team, must summon strength she didn’t know she possessed to return Caesar to the Ides of March. Kept silent by draconian non-disclosure agreements for more than two decades, the team members who participated in Danicek’s experiment have said nothing. Certain events have now permitted the story to be revealed. Perhaps the most surprising result of the experiment is that the lives of each team member were inexorably altered in ways no one could have predicted.

He came. He saw. She conquered.

In 1999, an elite interdisciplinary team headed by Nobel laureate Andrew Danicek gathered in California to carry out a ground-breaking time-travel experiment. While the...


Advance Praise

“We’ve all been asked at one point, who would you invite to a dinner party, dead or alive? Andrew Danicek, is a Nobel Laureate who creates a time machine to bring back Julius Caesar from the minute before he dies at the Ides or March. The book flows like a river through it’s twists and turns, while never losing sight of it’s main goal. The characters are well written, and the plot is easy to follow, although the only hole I can see is when Andrew searches for Andrej, the German boy he stood in for. Why didn’t it occur to him to search for Dieter? This is a beautifully written book that I shall be buying when it’s published.”–Emma Potter, Bookseller at Historic Royal Palaces, Goodreads.com

“Megan Edwards, who knows ancient Rome very well, retells the circumstances of Julius Caesar’s assassination in 44 B.C. with some highly entertaining twists and turns. This imaginative yarn has it all: time travel and Las Vegas, archaeological digs and billionaire poultry magnates, and a good portion of sex and skulduggery. If you have studied Classics in Rome as she has, or if you just want to know more about what might have happened on the Ides of March, this book is for you. A Coin for the Ferryman provides fun reading for beach or forum.”–Michael Maas, William Gaines Twyman Professor of History at Rice University, and author of Readings in Late Antiquity, The Cambridge Companion to the Age of Justinian, and John Lydus and the Roman Past

“A Coin for the Ferryman is a fantastic time travel thriller fiction. The plot has everything, from time travel to romance. But, the best part of the book is its climax which will keep you thinking about the plot for a long time. The author has amazingly plotted thrill, adventure and romance in one book. Also, diverse characters make the story more interesting.”–Sucharita Biswas, bibliophileverse.blogspot

“We’ve all been asked at one point, who would you invite to a dinner party, dead or alive? Andrew Danicek, is a Nobel Laureate who creates a time machine to bring back Julius Caesar from the minute...


Available Editions

EDITION Audiobook, Unabridged
ISBN 9781945501180
PRICE $32.00 (USD)
DURATION 13 Hours, 16 Minutes, 2 Seconds

Available on NetGalley

NetGalley Shelf App (AUDIO)

Average rating from 39 members


Featured Reviews

I just adored this. Most time travel books are terrible, but this was just perfection. It reminds me of Connie Willis. Review copy provided by publisher.

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There was a novel called The Rise and Fall of DODO that was about time travel, and the authors decided they needed to show all the intricacies of a realistic time travel experiment. The result was a tedius, dull, unending montage of people doing the exact same thing over and over and over again with a detailed accounting of every single failure no matter how pointless or boring. It was like being stuck in an endless loop in a video game. This book approached the time travel experiment the same way, but it shaved off 90% of DODO's monotony to GET TO THE DAMN STORY. What a concept! As a result, this was a fun time travel adventure. Twists, double crosses, secret agendas, all that fun stuff. I do get annoyed by books with the concept of "This is just a manuscript I found," or "This really happened but I have to call it fiction or people will think I'm crazy." It bugs me and pulls me out of the narrative faster than anything else. Definitely worth reading if you're interested in time travel or Caesar. Thanks to Netgalley for the advance copy of the audiobook.

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I received an early copy of this audiobook from Netgalley and Imbrifex books! All opinions are my own! When a time-travel experiment brings Julius Ceasar to the present, Cassandra discovers much more than secrets of the past. In order to get Ceasar back to the past, she must find strength she never knew she had, and maybe a bit more love than she had ever expected. I wasn't sure how I was going to feel about this book at first, but I ended up really enjoying it! It did start out a bit confusing because there were a lot of characters that I couldn't keep straight, especially in audiobook format. But after getting into it, I got really invested in the story and the characters! I really liked the way that Ceasar was portrayed in this book. It didn't focus so much on how we perceive Ceasar, but about making him into a human being with flaws and emotions just like anyone else. The romance did feel a little forced, likely because of the short timeline that the characters are on, but I still found myself invested in it. I also really liked that the book didn't seem to focus too much on the science. Time travel plots can often get messy and complicated, but I liked that this one kept it simple and made it understandable. It made the story more enjoyable without trying to wrap your mind around this huge scientific theory. If you're a history buff and/or a sci-fi lover, this might just be the book for you!

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A group of scientists conduct a time travel experiment where Julius Caesar is transported from 44BC to 1999. Of course, all things do not go according to plan resulting in an entertaining tale of adventure, romance and drama with the magic of Las Vegas thrown in. I stumbled on this audiobook while browsing ARCs on Netgalley and was hooked from get go. Written in an easy manner with lots of wit and humour thrown in, the book has well-developed and likable characters and an engrossing story line. An interesting meld of historical fact and fiction, adventure and sc-fi - this one has something for everybody. Thank you Netgalley and Imbrifex books for the ARC

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This is the best book I've read ALL YEAR. It was SO GOOD. I swear to god I haven't read a book this good in so long I actually cried when I finished it. I'm not at all exaggerating. This is a new favorite book of all time for me. Whether or not you were considering reading this book, just do it. It is so enjoyable and interesting and intriguing from the very start. Honestly, my only criticism is that she should have married Alexander and her not doing so makes absolutely no sense. In my head and in my future physical copy this is in fact what happens.

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What a fun read this turned out to be! Be aware this is not high literary art here just an enjoyable if implausible ride! It is 1999 and Andrew Danicek, Nobel Prize winning physicist, leads a team of scientists researching time travel. He has built Tessa a machine capable of transporting an object from the past into the present. Phase one is successfully completed-the transmission of an inanimate object, a coin, to the present day and returning it back to the same spot and time in the past. Phase two just ended with the successful transport of a dog round trip. Now the hard part doing the same with a human. To maintain a high ethical standard the subject must be within minutes of death in case something goes wrong. The exact time and place of subject must be known to history. Andrew decides on Julius Caesar and the story takes off. Expect a lot of action from a car chase to a romance! I really liked that the novel doesn’t attempt to explain the science too deeply. No in-depth understanding of physics is needed here! Each team member is introduced in their own section. This leads to fully fleshed out characters and gives the reader an understanding of motivations throughout. Some may find all the detail given excessive and unnecessary but I found the side stories interesting so I enjoyed them. This novel is not just an enjoyable read there is some explorations about the ethics involved in disrupting a life, even if just moments from death. No answers are given but it does make one pause to think. My only complaint is not regarding the book itself rather the audiobook. I really did not like the narrator. I found much of his performance was flat and monotone. This became an issue as the action began, there was no use of his voice to help build tension and a sense of urgency. I also prefer female narrators. They tend to do a better job differentiating gender. This narrator kinda sounded creepy when he was doing a female voice. Recommended for those who want an interesting take on the SciFi-time travel genre. 3.5 stars. I received an ARC of this book from the publisher, Imbrifex Books and NetGalley. This fact in no way influenced my review.

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My love for Rome is eternal! If there is just 1 thing you get to name that caught you into reading historical fiction - it's Julius Caesar & Shakespeare for me. That's where it all began in the 9th grade. After reading so many books that discuss the aspects of Julius Caesar's life, the events in the sequence of before and after of what happened in the Roman Empire this by far is the most astonishing one (apart from Shakespeare himself of course) It is the story of time itself. Of travelling 20 centuries back to abduct one of the greatest people - history has ever known for a research experiment. To have him for 4 days in the present with Latin scholars & move back to the exact time and space from where he was transported. But, even after taking meticulous precautions, things don't go the way they planned... You move through captivating twists of events with a plot within plot buildup. What kept me pondering even after I finished up the book was the part that was it all really fiction? What is myth - to me it's only a fact with no evidence OR proof of the statement. But in this modern age, it doesn't take time to gather facts and convert fiction to reality. From the days of Galileo to the present every fact was first considered either madness OR a myth. To me, this book presented that capability. My only turnoff point while I was reading this was that I had to wait for almost 50% of the book to really get Julius Caesar talking. After that, it was all butter flow! Loved the ending & wrap-up of the whole story. The way it challenges the written history in the face ca through you off-guard, & that's apparently what I like the most about such books.

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I received an advance review copy of this audiobook via NetGalleys in exchange for an honest review. [Content notes for this book include violence involving guns and knives, as well as discussions about war.] A Coin for the Ferryman is an exciting novel about an adventure that starts with the task of bringing Julius Caesar to the present time to learn from him, but the experiment does not go as planned as the unexpected complexities of Caesar being in the year 1999 come to light. I have a lot of good things to say about this book. Dealing with time travel can be a very difficult thing, but I have to say Edwards did a brilliant job of addressing its intricacies without boring the reader at all. I think everyone wanting to incorporate the element of time travel into their stories should use this book as an example of how to do it right. The characters are well-developed and not sanitized in any way, which is especially refreshing when we see Julius Caesar who has to navigate the present day by still being, well, himself as a BC man. For the most part, everyone felt very realistic (as much as is possible with a time travel scifi adventure), with a light touch of humor in their backstories. The novel is funny and well-written and also a bit emotional. It has the right amount of everything that a book of this nature would need. It also needs to become a movie; I'd definitely watch it in movie form, too.

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Historians, Time Travel, Julius Ceasar, and oh the drama! A group of scientists is working on a project to bring people from the past to the present. The first one to be transported is Julius Ceasar and it's a great success. The people who participate are not allowed to talk about it, not even with each other. Most importantly, they are not allowed to talk to Ceasar about his own future and death. But when Cassandra starts getting more attached to him than she should, things get complicated. Friendships are tested and secrets are revealed. The characters are a bit flat, but the overall writing is great. Loved the audiobook. I want to thank Netgalley for the free copy.

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An elite team of scientists and a young woman who can speak Latin are gathered to in a secret laboratory where they have been working on a time travel experiment. Nobel laureate Andrew Danicek, who heads the team, wants to make sure the experiment is a success. He doesn't want to just bring anyone into the present from the past. He would like to bring a historical figure. One that they can bring to the present for four days, learn what they can from this individual and send back. They decide upon a historical figure and *poof* Julius Caesar is standing in front of them. What will they make of him, more importantly what will he make of them? They need to be careful; they don't want to change history - it needs to remain the same! But will it? Cassandra speaks Latin so naturally she is the interpreter, but things don't quite go so smoothly at first... No one knows Caesar is there but then things change, and the plan goes out the window.... I enjoyed this book, and this take on time travel. The Ides of March is an important date on the Roman Calendar, and it also marks the assignation of Julius Caesar. How does it change things when you know someone's history? How does it change you? Will it change your history? This was a nice audiobook to listen to as I am often driving her and there for work. I enjoyed the narrator and the story. It may not appeal to some as it does take on a thriller feel around the middle. But I did find one thing in the book to be very clever. Pay attention to the beginning and ending is all I have to say - No spoiler but if you pay attention, you may be thinking "oh how clever!" as I did. Thank you to Imbrifex Books and NetGalley who provided me with a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. All the thoughts and opinions are my own.

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Thank you NetGalley for a pre-release copy of this book. This review supersedes my previous review of this book. I originally tried reading this book as an ebook, and I just couldn't get through it. The start was slow, confusing, etc. However, based on the description, I knew it should be right up my alley. I got a copy of the audiobook, and it made all the difference. Overall, I really enjoyed the book once it got to the premise. If you like Michael Crichton's book Timeline, you'll like this book. Only it's the reverse, what if someone from the past comes to the future. As complex as the story was, changing character viewpoints, plot lines and such, it really added to the richness of the story. I didn't see the ending coming! I highly recommend this book!

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In 1999, an elite team of scientists and classicists worked on a top-secret project. They were able to pull Julius Caesar from moments before his murder into the present with the plan to interview him and see what knowledge than can gain during the next 4 days, before they have to return him to the exact time and location from which he was plucked to avoid changing the future. Despite their strict security and preparations, someone has learned of Caesar’s visit to the future and attempts to kidnap him. It is up to Cassandra Fleury, the youngest member of the team, to keep Caesar safe and ensure he can be returned to the Ides of March at the designated time. This was an intriguing read. The whole time, I couldn’t help but wonder how it would all work out. I would have loved to know about the science behind their project, but the book does not delve into it. While the science is not covered, the story does take the time to get into the background of the main players in the book, and I enjoyed getting to know something of their past and mindset they were coming into the project with. The concept that the team members were pulling someone forward from the past rather than time travelling themselves was unique. Overall, I enjoyed this story; it was engaging. Mark Ashby did a nice job with the narration. Many thanks to NetGalley for providing me an audio ARC of this book.

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I loved this audiobook! What an amazingly interesting story. Every person who has studied history contemplates which historic personality he or she would like to meet assuming a time machine were available. In this novel, a time machine has been invented for the purpose of precisely dating artifacts. The author does not bore the reader with the physics of time travel or create silly pseudoscience. I really appreciated that. However, details about the restrictions involved in time travel are presented and all make sense. I found myself not needing to suspend disbelief. This book caught my attention from the first pages when we meet Julius Caesar in his own time. The book did not let me go until the very end. Julius Caesar was transported to the present day in the first experiment on a living human being. Caesar's character was absolutely believable! He behaved the way one would expect Caesar to behave. The plot was fascinating. Caesar interacting with modern people and the modern world was beautifully done. All of this was enormously satisfying. All of the present-day characters were well developed. There relationships to each other and Caesar were well developed. Dialogue was well-written and believable. I had never read this author before, but I would seek out her books and read her work again. This one is a winner! Recommended for those who enjoy Ancient Rome fiction, time travel, and historic fiction in general. If you like a good story with a complex, engrossing plot; this one is for you! Thanks to the publisher and NetGalley for an ARC of this audiobook in exchange for an honest review.

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Thank you NetGalley for a free copy in exchange for an honest review. I really enjoyed this, the beginning is a slow burn introducing us to all the characters. Once the second half starts the story gets much faster and becomes hard to put down. I thoroughly enjoyed it.

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A very unique take on a time-traveling narrative. Lots of hidden "Easter eggs" both in "present day" and in the past. We all know what happened on the Ides of March - now meet the team of the IDES lab who plan to take the opportunity of that day to bring Caesar - briefly - into our own time! The plan is laid out, the team assembled, and the day arrives. - all will go according to plan, right....? As I began reading this book, I was definitely taken with the range of characters, their backgrounds, and how they would play into the climax we all knew was coming - Julius Caesar brought to our time, thus the second half of this book threw me for a loop. Out of all the characters, the core of the story is Cassandra and Julius. In many way, this book has something for everyone - drama, sci-fi, historical fiction, action, mystery, and romance. You'll even learn some Latin along the way. A good book that you could easily recommend to anyone.

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3.5 First thank you to #Netgalley and the publisher for the opportunity to listen to this book in exchange for an honest review. For those that are looking to DNF this book- keep reading as it is worthwhile. Time Machine = find an amazing historical character to bring to the future = wow Ceasar is the craziest and best idea = find someone that can speak Latin = basis of this book. Regarding the narrator - Rod Sterling. That is who I thought of. The gentleman focusses on documentaries and I am sure I would enjoy those readings. In this case - it was distracting. I really enjoyed the story. I believe a reviewer / editor / friend / said "expand on the characters" and that is why the beginning is filled with just a tad too much detail. I was getting lost. I really had a difficult time moving from detailed historical fiction to action packed thriller. I am not even sure that makes sense and maybe I just need to think about it for a few days. (I am sure I will be updating this review). So WITHOUT spoilers, I move to the last third of the book. There is so much going on it kept me extremely engaged. The author did a great job of tying the questions in the beginning with answers in the end (sorry but you just have to read it) and without that "corny factor". So to finish - this has the potential for a great book - and geez I hate to say I think it just needs a bit more work to tie it together. Keep in mind I listened to this and it may have been a different experience if I read it.

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Pretty low-brow writing with caricature-like characters of little depth, but the story was certainly original and it did keep me wanting to know how it would all turn out. The ending was a fun twist, too.

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To be honest, I nearly didn't listen to the whole book. The first 3 chapters came across as juvenile and uneloquent. I'm not sure if it was the actual words "crappy room...crappy trailer...crappy bookshelf", or if it was the narrator's failed attempts at a British accent and what he thought ancient Roman translated into English would sound like. I persevered and was rewarded with an interesting, if implausible, story and the vast improvement of the narrator. The story is told from many different perspectives of a team who brings Julius Caesar to the year 1999. We learn pertinent backstories, and follow them from team formation, to planning the transport, and finally a chaotic 4 day visit where nothing goes as planned. Surprisingly, a Vegas "almost callgirl", a fast food millionaire, a rare coins dealer, a medical doctor, and an adult's childhood pet all make it into this book. It is a rough start, but worth the listen if you enjoy history.

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Time travel and Julius Caeser? Sign me up. 2.5 stars, rounded up to 3. I have a lot of mixed feelings on this one. Ultimately, it reads like a first draft. There's lots of bumbling around and it's hard to say what exactly the plot was. There are characters that could've been cut, scenes that could've been shortened (or sometimes extended), and the pacing was strange. However, with that being said, I'm absolutely thrilled with the ending. Since the very beginning of the book I was rooting for the author to really commit and not shy away from whatever story she wanted to tell. SHE DID IT. And for that alone I would recommend this book. The author had a goal in mind and she made it happen and I loved that.

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A novel combining ancient Roman figures AND time travel? Yes, please! Love the creativity of the story. Sure, it lacks scientific explanation and I would have liked more character development beyond the two main characters, but it was a pleasure to read. I did not care for the narration, which did not reflect the excitement of the action scenes, so I recommend reading the print version instead. I am a library paraprofessional and received an advance copy from #NetGalley. Opinions are my own.

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A Coin For The Ferryman by: Megan Edwards Pub. date: March 1, 2022 Audiobook Review date: January 16, 2022 Many thanks to Megan Edwards, Imbrifex Books & NetGalley, for allowing me to listen to this audiobook. I’m leaving this review voluntarily… A Coin For The Ferryman is one of the Best books I read in 2021.. It was a must that I request the audiobook version so I could hear Mark Ashby tell the story. I think he did an Amazing job, btw. I gave 4.5 stars to this magnificent book/audiobook & I Highly recommend. I Can’t Wait to see what Megan Edwards comes up with next! #ACoinForTheFerryman #NetGalley #MeganEdwards #ImbrifexBooks

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I received this audiobook as an advanced readers copy and the following review is soley my own. A Coin for the Ferryman is about a group of elite scientists and scholars working together on a secret time travel project. The team successfully transports the famous Julius Caesar to modern day California where they plan to have historians interact with him for a period of 4 days. Andrew and his team think they have a failsafe plan and will return Caesar safely to the past, but an attempted kidnapping is not the only thing working against the team. A major detour is taken that may change not only history, but the present. I enjoyed this story. I thought the author did a good job of bringing in all the different characters and giving small back stories on each so you knew why and how they got to where they were in the story. I did feel the story bounced around a little bit to the large # of characters. This may only be because I was listening to an audio version and may not be as confusing while reading the physical book. I really enjoyed the ending of the book, but only wished there would have been a follow up/resolution with Pippa. During the 2nd half of the book the story and excitement really picked up. Also, I know Caesar wasn't truely convinced he had been transported to the future and he was also trying to put on that "tough guy facade" but there were several situations where I thought, there is no way he would react like that! I don't think the cover of the book, does the story justice. Overall, I did enjoy this audiobook and I thank NetGalley, Megan Edwards and the publisher for giving me the opportunity to listen and review it. I give the story 3.5 stars and would recommend you give it a try..

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What would Julius Caesar do? An amusing science fiction what-if interwoven with drama, romance, and humor. Be patient with the multiple storylines early on as they quickly come together in the main story. Chapter 3 reads like it belongs in Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy and pulled me in so I would finish this book. Well-narrated (an especially big challenge with the different accents and languages peppered throughout the story).

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While I ultimately thought this was an OK audiobook, I did think several times about not finishing it. The narrator has a tone in his voice similar to narrator Kirt Graves which I don't find appealing. he also didn't put any emotion into it to help the story 'live". I thought this was going to be heavy on the scifi and historical stuff, but Caesar is almost forgotten in the pages upon pages of detail about the less exciting secondary characters and their backstory and current actions. We don't get any detail, certainly not from Caesar's POV in the first few hours of him being in the 20th century (story takes place in the late 90's). That's the most interesting part, how he would feel and respond to things. There are a few instances of that and a couple of flashbacks to his life, but they weren't the best choice in my opinion to add anything meaningful to the story. There was a lot of misogyny in this story by the male and female characters. The main character has a rare skill which should have been stressed in this situation in particular, not her looks, over and over. The action and narration did pick up towards the end and finally got me wrapped up in the story. I also appreciate the few moments of humor in how Caesar responded to the doctor. Since we got so much backstory the epilogue at the end was a nice touch too. I received a copy of the audiobook from Netgalley in exchange for my honest review.

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