The Fugitive Colours

Genevieve Planché Book 2

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Pub Date 12 May 2022 | Archive Date 13 May 2022

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Description

The highly anticipated follow-up to the sweeping historical thriller The Blue.

As Genevieve Sturbridge struggles to keep her silk design business afloat, she must face the fact that London in 1764 is very much a man’s world. Men control the arts and sciences, men control politics and law. And men definitely control women.

A Huguenot living in Spitalfields, Genevieve one day receives a surprise invitation from an important artist. Grasping at the promise of a better life, she dares to hope her luck is about to change and readies herself for an entry into the world of serious art.

She soon learns that for the portrait painters ruling over the wealthy in London society, fame and fortune are there for the taking. But such high stakes spur rivalries that darken to sabotage and blackmail—and even murder. And watching from the shadows are ruthless spies who wish harm to all of England.

Genevieve begins to suspect that her own secret past, when she was caught up in conspiracy and betrayal, has more to do with her entrée into London society than her talent. One wrong move could cost her not just her artistic dreams but the love of those she holds dear … and even her life.

A sequel to Nancy Bilyeau’s The Blue, The Fugitive Colours again reveals a dazzling world of glamour and treachery in Georgian England, when beauty held more value than human life. She immerses readers in a fictionalized account of real lives and events whilst staying faithful to the historical and social context.

The highly anticipated follow-up to the sweeping historical thriller The Blue.

As Genevieve Sturbridge struggles to keep her silk design business afloat, she must face the fact that London in 1764 is...


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Featured Reviews

My thanks to Nancy Bilyeau, Lume Books and Net Galley for the ARC of THE FUGITIVE COLOURS.
A wonderful, immersive story that kept me turning the page. This is the kind of writing I love. The era is one of my favourites, and I loved the story and the premise. Historical fiction at its very best! Recommended.

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What an absolutely beautiful book which delves into the murky world of C18th artists and the multifarious activities they are involved in. It's fascinating to learn more about how art and natural sciences overlapped and I felt immersed in a world of carriages shuttling between grand houses and dodgy goings on down dark alleyways. I'd not read the earlier book in the series The Blue, and this didn't detract from my enjoyment of this book. I'll definitely read it soon, as I enjoyed The Fugitive Colours so much! Thank you NetGalley!

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I liked this story very much. The plot was interesting and unusual, well planned and executed. I felt immersed in 18th Century London life and loved the setting of the art world, paintings and artists. I do feel that that I would have been better off reading the first book Blue before this as some of this story relates to earlier events but the author does a fine job in filling in background detail without it becoming too arduous. (In fact it whets my appetite for getting the earlier book!). Real life characters and events blend in seamlessly with the fiction incorporating well researched historical detail. Genevieve is an intelligent, talented and very likeable heroine desperately trying to balance family life with running her own silk design business but it seems that her life is never going to be straightforward or easy. I very much enjoyed the artistic detail of the work involved in perfecting her designs and the relationship she had with her two assistants, Jean and Caroline. The story kept me on my toes, and while several threads jostled for attention all was eventually resolved in a satisfactory and somewhat unexpected conclusion. I look forward to the next stage in Genevieve's eventful life!

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The Fugitive Colours is a sequel to Blue, a fascinating glimpse into the world of colour and porcelain painting in France before the revolution. I would highly recommend reading the first book as the background is important to fully understand the events taking place in the second book.

We are transported to 1764 England, where Genevieve Sturbridge is mistress of her own silk design workshop. A talented painter in her own right, she employs two other painters who help her produce designs that are more beautiful and original that any other designer at the time.

London is dirty, the air is foul and walking the streets is dangerous. Earning enough to support her household is becoming increasingly difficult. She has still not fully recovered from her traumatic experiences in France and she becomes alarmed when a serious of encounters with characters from her past begin to threaten the peace she has worked so hard for. Her experience as a former spy are crucial to her investigation of events unfolding around her as she feels her control slipping away, both with her work and her household.

Beautifully descriptive with believable characters, this is another one of those absorbing stories that will keep you up late at night.

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First, my appreciation to LUME Publishing for providing me with the opportunity to read the ARC of The Fugitive Colors and the further opportunity to post this review!

The gift of quality historical fiction is that the author not only entertains but educates us, taking us into the intimate world of characters often foreign to our twenty-first century minds. Against the backdrop of the Huguenot community in London’s Spitalfields and its silk weavers, Nancy Bilyeau has again skillfully done this, bringing us into a ‘sense of place and time’ in THE FUGITIVE COLORS.
The story picks up from where we left Genevieve Planché several years before in THE BLUE, now drawing us into the complex world of 1764 London following Britain’s defeat of the French after seven years of war. Despite it being a world where men control the arts, science, philosophy and---women, Genevieve is fueled by her passion and determination to become a recognized artist, triggering unexpected consequences for her family and those she loves.
The story slowly builds, teasing us as multi layers with twists and turns involving covetous greed, spies, forbidden investigation into the occult, blackmail and murder are deftly exposed with Genevieve firmly in the center of the tapestry. One more time, Nancy Bilyeau’s trademark, superb historical research brings her characters and their history alive for us, making THE FUGITIVE COLORS hard to put down until the last page is read.

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When I read Nancy Bilyear's The Blue, I felt dropped into a world I didn't much know about -- the world of painting fine china and how important the color blue was as enterprising entrepreneurs and countries fought for domination. By contrast, The Fugitive Colours was a world that I had encountered, however slightly. The world of Covent Garden and harlots and the backstabbing ton. And art, an art world that needs fresh, new colors.

Here Genevieve is now married--but is she happily married? Its hard to say, especially as her husband is pursuing other endeavors in order to offer support for thier family. Lucky for Genevieve, she knows how to run a business herself; at least, she has the wits and grit to make an effort of it. If only the rest of her world would cooperate. And, if only trouble wouldn't come knocking at her door.

The Fugitive Colours offers the same type of page turning intrigue as readers experienced in The Blue, but with even more interaction with London's dark and bright world of the 1760s. Also, now that so many of us have seen HARLOTS, we may have more visual idea of what that world looks like. I certainly enjoyed the comparison in my mind while reading this book and considering the many persons revolving around Genevieve and her hazardous world.

Thank you to the publisher for offering an arc in exchange for an honest review.

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As good and enchanting as The Blue! I’m glad to read more about Genevieve and to see her and Thomas end together with a connection to both Darwin and Wedgwood!

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I wish I had read The Blue first, but I’ll rectify that quickly…and you have the chance to do just that if you’re reading this. Regardless, this was a well told story and I was immediately invested in Genevieve’s story. Lots of action and games from the era are played out in this book. It also makes you realize just how lucky we women are these days in achieving our goals.

A great read that will transport you back in time and make it hard to put the book down.

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I have read a lot of this author's novels and was delighted to get a sequel to 'The Blue'. The author continues the story of Genevieve and the tale was so gripping I just couldn't put it down until I had finished it. The main character has set up a reasonably successful business in London, although she longs to be an artist, and it seems when Joshua Reynolds invites her to an art exhibition and a meal that her ambition is about to be realised. But in the eighteenth century, the age of Louis XV, women did not generally achieve such an ambition, with exceptions, and she does not know whether she will be one of these exceptions. Then follows a tale full of twists and turns none of which I can reveal without spoiling the book. Politics are involved, and espionage and crime. It is highly recommended for those who love exciting historical novels.

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I have read all but one of Nancy's books, so I am well versed on her writing. Fugitive Colours is the next in a series with The Blue being the first. This is an interesting book, continuing the storyline of Genevieve Sturbridge, a Huguenot who lives in Spitalfields. Spitalfields in the late 1700's was a home to silk weavers, and other artists. Genevieve is trying to keep her silk business going but her past seems to be ready to haunt her, she gets involved with people that she is not sure to who she can trust. If she makes a mistake, she could be ruined. There are ruthless people, including the person who offers her wealth in the world of art.

Does she dare take the offer? Risk her chances of a better world? This was a time that was ruled pretty much by men, and they controlled everything from the arts, sciences to law and politics. One wrong move or even a comment could ruin her. It also involves her husband, a science man, her son, her household staff and the two people who work with her. There are spies that could ruin her and all she worked for.

Fugitive Colors are colors that are temporary, exposed to things such as sun, temperature, humidity can change the pigmentation to a color. Why is it important in this book? Well, go get your copy and read for yourself.

Like I said, I have read all but one of Nancy's books, that will change, and I will be reading the one I missed. Her work is perfect, thoroughly researched and a thought put to paper with such a talent, that is hard to find. I love her works, can't you tell? I give this book five stars and I hope that there is another in this series or the Spafford series. One can hope! Thanks, Nancy, for the opportunity to read another one of your books!

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I started into the series with this book, but I had no problems of getting all the needed information. Some things from the first book were repeated, so the reader could understand the complexity of the characters and in some case the information was simply not necessary.
I found the story very interesting with likeable characters. As I am quite interested in history, this book showed me new aspects of the Seven-Years-war aftermath, not known from the history books. So it is valuable to me.

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The highly anticipated follow-up to the sweeping historical thriller The Blue. Great writing, great characters and a great storyline. Time to clear your schedule for the afternoon, coffee pot on and phone turned off - you won’t want to put this one down. This was a compelling and thoroughly enjoyable read from start to finish with a great storyline!

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Hard book to.put down!! Loved all the action...it was non stop. Very well.written and researched in my.opinion. it was a bad time for a woman to be free to do the work of her dreams but Genevieve persevered. Loved this story and highly recommend this book.

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I adored the Blue and lived this one even more! Genevieve is a smart strong willed woman trying to make it in the art world when women were nor represented nor respected. A highly entertaining historical novel..

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The Fugitive Colours
by Nancy Bilyeau
Lume Books
Pub Date: May 12

I completely fell under the sway of Nancy Bilyeau's The Fugitive Colours, sequel to the highly regarded The Blue.

Genevieve, a silk designer in Georgian England (London, 1764), finds that men not only control the arts market, but every aspect of society. She struggles financially and is thrilled when she receives an unexpected invitation from a famed artist.

Yet it comes with a price, she finds, as cut-throat competitors threaten artists' livelihoods and lives. Adding to the treachery are spies who want control over England. A beautifully written historical thriller that can be read as a standalone but makes readers like me want to go back and read The Blue immediately. Highly recommended!

Thanks to Nancy Bilyeau, Lume Books, and NetGalley for the ARC. Opinions are mine.

#FugitiveColours #NancyBilyeau
#LumeBooks #NetGalley #historicalthriller#mysterynovels #womensfictionnovel #ArtsInGeorgianEngland #SpiesInEngland1764 #bookstagramcommunity

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Good sequel to The Blue. I was quite intrigued, love me a good historic mystery. Loved all the talk about art and painting as well

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Courtesy of Netgalley I received the ARC of Fugitive Colours by Nancy Bilyeau. This historical novel extends the story of Genevieve Planché Sturbridge, heroine of Blue. This story combines elements of espionage and intrigue in 1700's London. With insight into the art world, silk weaving, chemistry and spies, I was totally absorbed in this sequel.

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This book started out a bit slow for me but once the pace increased I could not stop reading. The characters were familiar to me from reading The Blue and I would definitely recommend reading The Blue before reading The Fugitive Colours. Focusing on the silk industry and the art world in London during the 1700's, the characters come alive. The descriptions of place made me feel like I was breathing in the the smoke-laden air. I definitely recommend this book. Hopefully there will be a third book in the series with more adventures with Genevieve and Thomas.

I received a copy from NetGalley.

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I was originally drawn to this story because the main character is a Huguenot living in Spitalfields. I don’t find a lot of historical fiction focused on Huguenots, either in France or in England, so that definitely piqued my interest. But I got a lot more than that. The plot also encompasses the burgeoning art scene in 18th century London, French spies at the close of the Seven Year War, and a quick foray into alchemy.

This is the second installment in the Genevieve Planché series and while I haven’t read the first book, the author does such a good job of bringing the reader up to speed on what happened before this novel starts, I may not have to. Which, I suppose, is a double edged sword since I don’t feel the need to run out and buy the first novel, but I was fully engaged in this one without having to wonder what the heck the author was referring to in the backstory.

I bring that up because due to the main character’s involvement in espionage in the first novel, her husband Thomas, a chemist (or natural philosopher), can no longer do any work with colors. This sets up a multi-layered conflict in this novel.

I’ll admit, I had a hard time getting into the book at first. It begins with a prologue that gave me the impression this was going to be more of a thriller. While it’s definitely suspenseful, It’s not a break-neck thriller, which was fine, but the pacing in the first few chapters felt slow due to my expectations. Once I settled into the story and Genevieve’s day to day life juggling her business of creating paintings for silk, playing referee between her two employees, and maintaining a household with a young child and less than responsible servants, I was engrossed. The historical details are superb and the author seamlessly moves from the world of artisans to spymasters and from affluent neighborhoods to Covent Gardens. Woven into the large cast of interesting and fully formed fictional characters are a parade of real historic figures.

I realize I didn’t actually write a blurb for this book but there’s so much going on, multiple storylines that were all wrapped up plausibly AND managed to hint at another installment (I hope), that my entire review probably would have been spent on the summary. Suffice it to say that I finished the book satisfied and supremely impressed at the level of immersive historic detail.

I rated this novel a solid four stars. ⭐⭐⭐⭐

Thank you to NetGalley and Lume Books for providing the ARC copy of this novel. I have left my review honestly and voluntarily.

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Hi and welcome to my review of The Fugitive Colours!

Published four years after The Blue, The Fugitive Colours continues the story of Genevieve Planché, now Mrs Sturbridge. I had a great time reading The Blue via The Pigeonhole back in 2018, even though I wasn’t much of a hist fic reader at the time. The Blue was definitely one of the books that broadened my horizons, opening my eyes and my heart to historical fiction and when I spotted The Fugitive Colours on NetGalley I couldn’t click on that request button fast enough.

Note that The Fugitive Colours can be read without having read The Blue, to be perfectly honest I don’t recall all the details either but I had no trouble following the story.

While Genevieve was a feisty and outspoken single woman in The Blue, in The Fugitive Colours she is married with a young son. She is still feisty and she still hasn’t completely given up on the dream to become an artist but by necessity, her plans have morphed into a business deemed slightly more suitable for a woman: she has her own silk design business with two artists in her employ.

Like its predecessor, The Fugitive Colours addresses the fact that in mid-18th century London, women are still very much secondary to men. It also taught me about the continuing struggles and rivalry between England and France and their respective kings, and the plights of English Huguenots and professions like silkweavers. In this respect, it reminded me of Blackberry & Wild Rose by Sonia Velton.

While all the main characters are fictional, the author did manage to sneak in a rather impressive number of real persons. Most notably to me was the portraitist Joshua Reynolds, whose faulty technique in mixing paints led to the title of this novel.

The Fugitive Colours is a bit of a slowburner until all the storylines come to a head and everything is happening all at once. It’s a story of intrigue laced with espionage in a world where people fight tooth and nail for what they believe in.

The Fugitive Colours didn’t quite enchant me as much as The Blue or this author’s Dreamland, I’m not sure why, but I think that it lacked a certain trigger to truly spark my fascination, The Blue has the search for creating the perfect colour blue, which – to my great surprise – fascinated me to no end, and Dreamland is set on Coney Island, a place I’ve always found fascinating. So I guess I kinda missed that fascination this time around, but obviously that’s just me. I did have a good time with The Fugitive Colours and I’d recommend it to hist fic readers, especially those who enjoy stories set in the Georgian era.

Thanks to Lume Books and NetGalley for the eARC. All opinions are my own.

The Fugitive Colours will be out on 12 May.

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I really loved the first novel in this series. Did that instantly make my expectations for this book higher than average? Maybe so. I found it to be entertaining, but not at the level of the first book, The Blue.

Genevieve and Thomas Sturbridge return in this story, now married and living in London with their son, Pierre. Through strange machinations, Genevieve is approached by London’s leading portrait artist and pressured to help him solve a private problem he is facing. Other madness goes on simultaneously with her employees, old friends, and new acquaintances, until it all comes together in the end.

There were SO many individual elements in this story, and I think Nancy Bilyeau tied them all together exceptionally well at the conclusion. I did not find the mysteries of this narrative as engaging as those of The Blue, but this book is shorter and I breezed through it easily. I had no idea what “fugitive colours” were before I read this story! Very interesting, as usual. I find this author’s historical fiction to be very well written — I feel submersed in the time period without being overburdened by detail or historical fact. I realize that this is a highly objective matter, but it’s perfect for my preferences!

Thank you to Lume Books, Nancy Bilyeau, and NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this ARC!

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Richly detailed and evocative. Excellent sequel to The Blue, and equally (if not more!) engaging. I love Genevieve's character with her struggles to be so many things to different people balanced against her own hidden desire to be a painter.

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What a difference! Too often sequels are disappointing; but not in this case. I enjoyed 'The Blue', the first book in this series, and liked the main character, Genevieve very much. This book expands on her character really well, and introduces some very interesting new characters too. It's full of intrigue, mystery and secrets. I'm a great fan of fictional characters mingling with real people in historical fiction, and Genevieve's relationship with Joshua Reynolds and the art scene of Georgian London brings a wonderful dimension to the story. Nancy Bilyeau's research is immaculate, making her one of my new favourite authors of historical fiction. Much better than the first book, this is a definite must-read, and can be done without having read 'The Blue'. My thanks to NetGalley for the advance copy to read.

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An exciting addition to the series. It was as interesting as the first book. The secrecy and intrigue will have you guessing on who the bad people are. The true people of the time are an interesting addition to the book. Received an ARC from Netgalley and leaving a voluntary review.

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A new Nancy Bilyeau book is always something to look forward to. I’ve loved everything I’ve read by her so far: her Joanna Stafford trilogy, about a nun displaced in Tudor England after the dissolution of the monasteries; Dreamland, set in a Coney Island amusement park; and The Blue, a wonderful historical thriller involving spies, art and the race to create a beautiful new shade of blue. The Fugitive Colours is a sequel to The Blue and another great read; the two books stand alone, so it’s not necessary to have read the first novel before beginning this one, although I would recommend doing so if you can.

It’s 1764 and Genevieve Planché, heroine of The Blue, is now a married woman running her own silk design business in Spitalfields, London. With the help of her two young assistant artists, Caroline and Jean, Genevieve is beginning to find buyers for her silk designs and is determined to make the business a success. However, she has not given up on her dream of becoming a serious artist and when she is invited to a gathering at the home of the portrait painter Joshua Reynolds, it seems she could still have a chance of achieving her ambition.

This in itself would have been the basis for an interesting novel – a woman trying to build a career for herself in what was still very much a male-dominated field – but there’s a lot more to the story than that. Due to the parts played by Genevieve and her husband in the recent search for the blue, their names have come to the attention of some very powerful people who are hoping to enlist them in further conspiracies. Yet again Genevieve is forced to wonder who she can and cannot trust, but this time one wrong decision could mean the end of her dreams, the loss of her business and even the destruction of her marriage.

The Fugitive Colours is perhaps not quite as exciting and fast-paced as The Blue, but I found it equally gripping. Set entirely in London, it’s a very immersive book taking us from the Spitalfields workshops of the Huguenot silk-weaving community to the grand homes of the rich and famous and the nightlife of Covent Garden. While Genevieve and most of the other main characters are fictional, we do meet some real historical figures too – not just Joshua Reynolds but also Giacomo Casanova, the Earl of Sandwich and the fascinating Chevalier d’Eon. I particularly enjoyed the portrayal of the 18th century art world, the snippets of information I picked up (not coming from an art background myself, I didn’t know what ‘fugitive colours’ were, but now I do), and the insights into how difficult it was for women like Genevieve and the real-life Frances Reynolds, Joshua’s sister, to gain recognition for their work.

I hope there will be another book in the Genevieve Planché series as I think there’s certainly a lot more that could be written about her. If not, I’ll look forward to seeing what Nancy Bilyeau decides to write next.

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The story held me tight from start to finish. I enjoyed the characters and the insight into life in Hanoverian England. I came away from this wanting to read the first book in the series, and keen to look for more work by this author.

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A compelling read that I whizzed through, I couldn't put it down. Well written with engaging and believable characters and a gripping storyline. I loved it.

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Hello! I really loved and enjoyed the Fugitive Colours by Nancy Bilyeau. Wow! My favorite period of time is that of the eighteenth century, and I am always on the hunt for the next new novel that allows me to travel back to and provides immersion into that century. I am thrilled to be able to read the continuing story that is Genevieve's. I am normally not a fan of first-person narrative, but Nancy Bilyeau is such an expert with her writing, description, and characterizations, that, as I read, I almost forgot in which voice the book is. I was transported into character and scene. The author brilliantly combined art, espionage, philosophy, and silk weaving! She has absolutely done a lot of research to be able to have incorporated so many details into the story. And how wonderful to have a book that mentions Sir Joshua Reynolds (a prominent character in the book!), Sir George Romney, and Mozart, to name a few! I highly recommend this book and really appreciate having had an ARC from NetGalley. Thank you! :)

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The highly anticipated follow-up to the sweeping historical thriller The Blue.

As Genevieve Sturbridge struggles to keep her silk design business afloat, she must face the fact that London in 1764 is very much a man’s world. Men control the arts and sciences, men control politics and law. And men definitely control women.

A Huguenot living in Spitalfields, Genevieve one day receives a surprise invitation from an important artist. Grasping at the promise of a better life, she dares to hope her luck is about to change and readies herself for an entry into the world of serious art.

She soon learns that for the portrait painters ruling over the wealthy in London society, fame and fortune are there for the taking. But such high stakes spur rivalries that darken to sabotage and blackmail—and even murder. And watching from the shadows are ruthless spies who wish harm to all of England.

Genevieve begins to suspect that her own secret past, when she was caught up in conspiracy and betrayal, has more to do with her entrée into London society than her talent. One wrong move could cost her not just her artistic dreams but the love of those she holds dear … and even her life.

A sequel to Nancy Bilyeau’s The Blue, The Fugitive Colours again reveals a dazzling world of glamour and treachery in Georgian England, when beauty held more value than human life. She immerses readers in a fictionalized account of real lives and events whilst staying faithful to the historical and social context.

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The follow-up to the wonderful book "The Blue" - (before I go any further, go to your nearest book store and pick up that wonderful tale, you won't be sorry) - this sequel starts out with a Genevieve struggling to keep her silk business alive. Having learned that men control everything about silk, she struggles to overcome this imbalance and to fight for her dreams. This book has something in it for everyone: history, politics, espionage, romance. A added interest is the Huguenot aspect. Many people do not know or understand the hatred for the Huguenots during this time period. The author does an excellent job at describing the "war" between the Huguenots and Catholics in France that spilled over to other countries in Europe and England. Very well done and educational about the silk business, religion, and everyday life of the 1700's, especially for women.

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The fugitive was nothing like I expected, yet everything I NEEDED. It kept me page turning late into the night with the inability to put it down and go to sleep.
Was beautiful writing, story telling, and captivating details. I will be recommending this one for a long time.

Thank you NetGalley and Lume Books for allowing me to review this!

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After being pulled into the world of the 1750's London in the Spitalfields, I couldn't help but fall in love with The Blue and the world of porcelain making. Because of this, I had high expectations for The Fugitive Colours. And boy, I was not disappointed.
We're reintroduced to Genevieve Planche, now one Mrs. Strurbridge, roughly six years after her adventures in Derby. After having inherited her family house, Genevieve now runs a semi-successful silk decour business. Though, there's nothing more she wants than to leave the past both her and Thomas share behind. Afterall, it would be best for everyone involved.
Though, Genevieve doesn't quite get what she wishes for and is quickly thrusted back into the world of art, and of course, colours.
After finishing The Blue, I couldn't help but anticipate what was next for Mr. and Mrs. Sturbridge. The writing was brilliant, and I quite enjoyed the introduction of new characters and the reintroduction of old faces alike, I thoroughly enjoyed seeing that headstrong Genevieve could not quietly let her dream of being an artist go. I loved seeing Genevieve use skills acquired as a spy in the last book to figure out just what was going on. The book was beautifully written, and I can't help but think I'll find myself coming back to this series in the future.
Thanks to NetGalley for providing me with this wonderful book to read and review.

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An evocative and detailed glimpse into the world of the Spitalfields silk weavers showing the difficulties of being a woman attempting to run a business.
The story was very engaging with plentiful details which set the scene very clearly.
Geneviève is a well rounded character and highly likable. I appreciated the mix of fictional characters and real people
My only regret is that I have not read the first book which would have helped in understanding the situation Geneviève and her husband Thomas find themselves in.

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